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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-01-07
    Description: Cervical cancer is responsible for 10-15% of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. The aetiological role of infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs) in cervical carcinomas is well established. Previous studies have also implicated somatic mutations in PIK3CA, PTEN, TP53, STK11 and KRAS as well as several copy-number alterations in the pathogenesis of cervical carcinomas. Here we report whole-exome sequencing analysis of 115 cervical carcinoma-normal paired samples, transcriptome sequencing of 79 cases and whole-genome sequencing of 14 tumour-normal pairs. Previously unknown somatic mutations in 79 primary squamous cell carcinomas include recurrent E322K substitutions in the MAPK1 gene (8%), inactivating mutations in the HLA-B gene (9%), and mutations in EP300 (16%), FBXW7 (15%), NFE2L2 (4%), TP53 (5%) and ERBB2 (6%). We also observe somatic ELF3 (13%) and CBFB (8%) mutations in 24 adenocarcinomas. Squamous cell carcinomas have higher frequencies of somatic nucleotide substitutions occurring at cytosines preceded by thymines (Tp*C sites) than adenocarcinomas. Gene expression levels at HPV integration sites were statistically significantly higher in tumours with HPV integration compared with expression of the same genes in tumours without viral integration at the same site. These data demonstrate several recurrent genomic alterations in cervical carcinomas that suggest new strategies to combat this disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4161954/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4161954/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ojesina, Akinyemi I -- Lichtenstein, Lee -- Freeman, Samuel S -- Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar -- Imaz-Rosshandler, Ivan -- Pugh, Trevor J -- Cherniack, Andrew D -- Ambrogio, Lauren -- Cibulskis, Kristian -- Bertelsen, Bjorn -- Romero-Cordoba, Sandra -- Trevino, Victor -- Vazquez-Santillan, Karla -- Guadarrama, Alberto Salido -- Wright, Alexi A -- Rosenberg, Mara W -- Duke, Fujiko -- Kaplan, Bethany -- Wang, Rui -- Nickerson, Elizabeth -- Walline, Heather M -- Lawrence, Michael S -- Stewart, Chip -- Carter, Scott L -- McKenna, Aaron -- Rodriguez-Sanchez, Iram P -- Espinosa-Castilla, Magali -- Woie, Kathrine -- Bjorge, Line -- Wik, Elisabeth -- Halle, Mari K -- Hoivik, Erling A -- Krakstad, Camilla -- Gabino, Nayeli Belem -- Gomez-Macias, Gabriela Sofia -- Valdez-Chapa, Lezmes D -- Garza-Rodriguez, Maria Lourdes -- Maytorena, German -- Vazquez, Jorge -- Rodea, Carlos -- Cravioto, Adrian -- Cortes, Maria L -- Greulich, Heidi -- Crum, Christopher P -- Neuberg, Donna S -- Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo -- Escareno, Claudia Rangel -- Akslen, Lars A -- Carey, Thomas E -- Vintermyr, Olav K -- Gabriel, Stacey B -- Barrera-Saldana, Hugo A -- Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge -- Getz, Gad -- Salvesen, Helga B -- Meyerson, Matthew -- K07 CA166210/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009676/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Feb 20;506(7488):371-5. doi: 10.1038/nature12881. Epub 2013 Dec 25.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [3]. ; 1] The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2]. ; The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genomica, Mexico City 14610, Mexico. ; Department of Pathology, Haukeland University Hospital, N5021 Bergen, Norway. ; Tecnologico de Monterrey, Monterrey 64849, Mexico. ; 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] Department of Thoracic Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032, China. ; Cancer Biology Program, Program in the Biomedical Sciences, Rackham Graduate School, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; Facultad de Medicina y Hospital Universitario 'Dr. Jose Eluterio Gonzalez' de la Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon 64460, Mexico. ; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, N5021 Bergen, Norway. ; 1] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, N5021 Bergen, Norway [2] Department of Clinical Science, Centre for Cancer Biomarkers, University of Bergen, N5020 Bergen, Norway. ; Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico City 06720, Mexico. ; 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [3] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; 1] Instituto Nacional de Medicina Genomica, Mexico City 14610, Mexico [2] Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, California 91711, USA. ; 1] Department of Pathology, Haukeland University Hospital, N5021 Bergen, Norway [2] Centre for Cancer Biomarkers, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, N5020 Bergen, Norway. ; Head and Neck Oncology Program and Department of Otolaryngology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan 38109, USA. ; 1] The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; 1] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, N5021 Bergen, Norway [2] Department of Clinical Science, Centre for Cancer Biomarkers, University of Bergen, N5020 Bergen, Norway [3]. ; 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [3] Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [4].〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24390348" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenocarcinoma/genetics/virology ; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/genetics/virology ; Case-Control Studies ; Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics ; Core Binding Factor beta Subunit/genetics ; DNA Copy Number Variations/genetics ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; E1A-Associated p300 Protein/genetics ; Exome/genetics ; F-Box Proteins/genetics ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genomics ; HLA-B Antigens/genetics ; Humans ; Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1/genetics ; Mutation/*genetics ; NF-E2-Related Factor 2/genetics ; Papillomaviridae/genetics/physiology ; Papillomavirus Infections/genetics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins/genetics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-ets ; Receptor, ErbB-2/genetics ; Transcription Factors/genetics ; Transcriptome/genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/genetics ; Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/*genetics/virology ; Virus Integration/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-01-09
    Description: A link between inflammatory disease and bone loss is now recognized. However, limited data exist on the impact of virus infection on bone loss and regeneration. Bone loss results from an imbalance in remodeling, the physiological process whereby the skeleton undergoes continual cycles of formation and resorption. The specific molecular and cellular mechanisms linking virus-induced inflammation to bone loss remain unclear. In the current study, we provide evidence that infection of mice with either lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) or pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) resulted in rapid and substantial loss of osteoblasts from the bone surface. Osteoblast ablation was associated with elevated levels of circulating inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IFN-, IL-6, and CCL2. Both LCMV and PVM infections resulted in reduced osteoblast-specific gene expression in bone, loss of osteoblasts, and reduced serum markers of bone formation, including osteocalcin and procollagen type 1 N propeptide. Infection of Rag-1–deficient mice (which lack adaptive immune cells) or specific depletion of CD8 + T lymphocytes limited osteoblast loss associated with LCMV infection. By contrast, CD8 + T cell depletion had no apparent impact on osteoblast ablation in association with PVM infection. In summary, our data demonstrate dramatic loss of osteoblasts in response to virus infection and associated systemic inflammation. Further, the inflammatory mechanisms mediating viral infection-induced bone loss depend on the specific inflammatory condition.
    Print ISSN: 0022-1767
    Electronic ISSN: 1550-6606
    Topics: Medicine
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