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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; BRCA1 ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; EXCISION-REPAIR ; ONCOLOGY ; BRCA2 ; breast cancer risk ; NUCLEOTIDE ; ERCC4
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: In this study we aimed to evaluate the role of a SNP in intron 1 of the ERCC4 gene (rs744154), previously reported to be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer in the general population, as a breast cancer risk modifier in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. METHODS: We have genotyped rs744154 in 9408 BRCA1 and 5632 BRCA2 mutation carriers from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) and assessed its association with breast cancer risk using a retrospective weighted cohort approach. RESULTS: We found no evidence of association with breast cancer risk for BRCA1 (per-allele HR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.93-1.04, P = 0.5) or BRCA2 (per-allele HR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.89-1.06, P = 0.5) mutation carriers. CONCLUSION: This SNP is not a significant modifier of breast cancer risk for mutation carriers, though weak associations cannot be ruled out.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19920816
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SUPPORT ; incidence ; RISK ; RISKS ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; LYMPHOMA ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; INDIVIDUALS ; PREVALENCE ; body mass index ; EPIC ; nutrition ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; FOLLICULAR LYMPHOMA ; RELATIVE RISK ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; BODIES ; multiple myeloma ; WEIGHT ; prospective studies ; HEIGHT ; methods ; diffuse large B-cell lymphoma ; SUBTYPES ; MASS ; prospective ; prospective study ; NOR ; B-CELL ; body mass ; RATIO ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; non-Hodgkin ; CONFIDENCE-INTERVALS
    Abstract: The incidences of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma are increasing steadily. It has been hypothesized that this may be due, in part, to the parallel rising prevalence of obesity. It is biologically plausible that anthropometric characteristics can infuence the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. DESIGN AND METHODS: In the context of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), anthropometric characteristics were assessed in 371,983 cancer-free individuals at baseline. During the 8.5 years of follow-up, 1,219 histologically confirmed incident cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma occurred in 609 men and 610 women. Gender-specific proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of development of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in relation to the anthropometric characteristics. RESULTS: Height was associated with overall non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in women (RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.14-1.98) for highest versus lowest quartile; p-trend 〈 0.01) but not in men. Neither obesity (weight and body mass index) nor abdominal fat (waist-to-hip ratio, waist or hip circumference) measures were positively associated with overall non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Relative risks for highest versus lowest body mass index quartile were 1.09 (95% CI 0.85-1.38) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.71-1.19) for men and women, respectively. Women in the upper body mass index quartile were at greater risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (RR 2.18, 95% CI 1.05-4.53) and taller women had an elevated risk of follicular lymphoma (RR 1.25, 95% CI 0.59-2.62). Among men, height and body mass index were non-significantly, positively related to follicular lymphoma. Multiple myeloma risk alone was elevated for taller women (RR 2.34, 95% CI 1.29-4.21) and heavier men (RR 1.77, 95% CI 1.02-3.05). CONCLUSIONS: The EPIC analyses support an association between height and overall non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma among women and suggest heterogeneous subtype associations. This is one of the first prospective studies focusing on central adiposity and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma subtypes
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18835833
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  • 3
    Keywords: brain ; CANCER ; tumor ; CLASSIFICATION ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; meningioma ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; RISK-FACTORS ; GROWTH-FACTOR RECEPTOR ; COMPARATIVE GENOMIC HYBRIDIZATION ; DIFFERENCE ; genetics ; etiology ; risk factors ; ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC-LEUKEMIA ; UNITED-STATES ; CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM ; STATES ; molecular epidemiology ; molecular ; ONCOLOGY ; review ; BRAIN-TUMORS ; GLIOMA ; RECURSIVE PARTITIONING ANALYSIS ; interaction ; brain tumors ; REGULATORY T-CELLS ; methods ; SUBTYPES ; TECHNOLOGY ; USA ; RISK-FACTOR ; ATOMIC-BOMB SURVIVORS ; pediatric ; OCCUPATIONAL RISK-FACTORS ; MOBILE PHONE USE ; interactions ; CONSORTIUM ; INVESTIGATORS ; MALIGNANT GLIOMA PATIENTS
    Abstract: Epidemiologists in the Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC) have prioritized areas for further research. Although many risk factors have been examined over the past several decades, there are few consistent findings, possibly because of small sample sizes in individual studies and differences between studies in patients, tumor types, and methods of classification. Individual studies generally have lacked samples of sufficient size to examine interactions. A major priority based on available evidence and technologies includes expanding research in genetics and molecular epidemiology of brain tumors. BTEC has taken an active role in Promoting understudied groups, such as pediatric brain tumors; the etiology of rare glioma subtypes, such as oligodendroglioma; and meningioma, which, although it is not uncommon, has only recently, been registered systematically in the United States. There also is a pressing need for more researchers, especially junior investigators, to study brain tumor epidemiology. However, relatively poor funding for brain tumor research has made it difficult to encourage careers in this area. In this report, BTEC epidemiologists reviewed the groups Consensus oil the Current state of scientific findings, and they present a consensus oil research priorities to identify which important areas the science should move to address
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18798534
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; LYMPHOMA ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; risk factors ; RISK FACTOR ; EPIC ; nutrition ; TRENDS ; education ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; ONCOLOGY ; LYMPHOMAS ; prospective ; B-CELL ; SUBGROUPS ; SES ; non-Hodgkin
    Abstract: Lymphomas belong to the few cancer sites with increasing incidence over past decades, and only a few risk factors have been established. We explored the association between education and the incidence of lymphoma in the prospective EPIC study. Within 3,567,410 person-years of follow-up, 1,319 lymphoma cases [1,253 non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) and 66 Hodgkin lymphomas (HL)] were identified. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to examine the association between highest educational level (primary school or less, technical/professional school, secondary school, university) and lymphoma risk. Overall, no consistent associations between educational level and lymphoma risk were observed; however, associations were found for sub-groups of the cohort. We observed a higher risk of B-NHL (HR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.02-1.68; n = 583) in women with the highest education level (university) but not in men. Concerning sub-classes of B-NHL, a positive association between education and risk of B cell chronic lymphatic leukaemia (BCLL) was observed only in women. In both genders, the risk of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) was significantly lower for subjects with university degree (HR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.27-0.79) versus lowest educational level. No association was found for HL. We could not confirm an overall consistent association of education and risk of HL or NHL in this large prospective study; although, education was positively related to the incidence of BCLL and B-NHL (in women) but inversely to incidence of DLBCL. Due to limited number of cases in sub-classes and the large number of comparisons, the possibility of chance findings can not be excluded
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19582474
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  • 5
    Keywords: brain ; tumor ; COMMON ; DISEASE ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; validation ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; BREAST-CANCER ; DELETION ; genetics ; SNP ; RETINOIC ACID ; brain tumor ; VARIANT ; GLIOMA ; SNPs ; METAANALYSIS ; ALLELES ; USA ; NERVOUS-SYSTEM TUMORS ; GLIOBLASTOMA ; LOCI ; 8Q24 ; BIRTH-WEIGHT ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; Genetic ; Genome-wide association studies ; BRAIN-TUMOR
    Abstract: To identify risk variants for glioma, we conducted a meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies by genotyping 550K tagging SNPs in a total of 1,878 cases and 3,670 controls, with validation in three additional independent series totaling 2,545 cases and 2,953 controls. We identified five risk loci for glioma at 5p15.33 (rs2736100, TERT; P = 1.50 x 10(-17)), 8q24.21 (rs4295627, CCDC26; P = 2.34 x 10(-18)), 9p21.3 (rs4977756, CDKN2A-CDKN2B; P = 7.24 x 10(-15)), 20q13.33 (rs6010620, RTEL1; P = 2.52 x 10(-12)) and 11q23.3 (rs498872, PHLDB1; P = 1.07 x 10(-8)). These data show that common low-penetrance susceptibility alleles contribute to the risk of developing glioma and provide insight into disease causation of this primary brain tumor
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19578367
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER MORTALITY ; WORKERS ; virus ; SOLVENTS ; MEAT INDUSTRY ; NON-HODGKIN-LYMPHOMA ; MALIGNANT-LYMPHOMAS ; BENZENE EXPOSURE
    Abstract: Objectives Evidence suggests that certain occupations and related exposures may increase the risk of malignant lymphoma. Farming, printing and paper industry, wood processing, meat handling and processing, welding, shoe and leather manufacturing and teaching profession are among the categories that have been implicated in previous studies. The relationship between occupation and malignant lymphoma has been investigated in a large European prospective study. Methods We investigated occupational risks for lymphomas in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The mean follow-up time for 348 555 subjects was 9 years (SD: 2 years). The analysis was based on 866 and 48 newly diagnosed cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). These were identified in the EPIC subcohorts with occupational data. Data on 52 occupations were collected through standardised questionnaires. Cox proportional hazard models were used to explore the association between occupation and risk of malignant lymphoma. Results The following occupations were positively associated with malignant NHL after adjustment for study centre, age, sex, socioeconomic status (SES), smoking and alcohol: butchers (HR=1.53, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.48, including multiple myeloma/plasmacytoma; HR=1.30, 95% CI 1.00 to 2.66, excluding multiple myeloma/plasmacytoma) and car repair workers (HR=1.50, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.00, including multiple myeloma/plasmacytoma; HR=1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.31, excluding multiple myeloma/plasmacytoma). HL was associated with gasoline station occupation (HR=4.59, 95% CI 1.08 to 19.6). Conclusion The findings in this current study of a higher risk of NHL among car repair workers and butchers and a higher risk of HL among gasoline station workers suggest a possible role from occupationally related exposures, such as solvents and zoonotic viruses, as risk factors for malignant lymphoma.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20884795
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1432-198X
    Keywords: Key words Wegener granulomatosis ; Renal failure ; Respiratory failure ; Inflammation ; Pulmonary infiltrates
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract  This retrospective study reports seven children and three young adults (aged 11–30 years) who suffered from Wegener granulomatosis. Nine represent consecutive patients admitted to the Division of Nephrology over a period of 23 years. All patients had respiratory tract symptoms and renal involvement on admission. In several patients infiltrates on chest X-ray developed within 2 weeks of onset of symptoms. All patients survived. The median observation period was 9 years (range 13 months to 23 years). One patient progressed to end-stage renal disease. Nine patients initially received cyclophosphamide and steroids. After a median period of 9 months (range 6–31 months) the cyclophosphamide was replaced by azathioprine. Relapses occurred after a median of 28 months (range 4–120 months) in 80% of patients, in six of the eight patients causing a definite decrease in kidney function. We believe that early diagnosis and initiation of therapy reduce the extent of organ damage. Since relapses are frequent, these patients should be evaluated frequently.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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