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  • 1
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; POPULATION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; hormone ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FISH ; FIBER ; COLON-CANCER ; DOSE-RESPONSE ; Jun ; DIET ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; EPIC CALIBRATION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; INTERVAL ; TESTS ; alcohol consumption ; MEAT INTAKE ; DIETARY CARCINOGENS ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; N-NITROSATION ; RED MEAT
    Abstract: Background. Current evidence suggests that high red meat intake is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. High fish intake may be associated with a decreased risk, but the existing evidence is less convincing. Methods: We prospectively followed 478040 men and women from 10 European countries who were free of cancer at enrollment between 1992 and 1998. Information on diet and lifestyle was collected at baseline. After a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 1329 incident colorectal cancers were documented. We examined the relationship between intakes of red and processed meat, poultry, and fish and colorectal cancer risk using a proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex, energy (nonfat and fat sources), height, weight, work-related physical activity, smoking status, dietary fiber and folate, and alcohol consumption, stratified by center. A calibration substudy based on 36994 subjects was used to correct hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for diet measurement errors. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Colorectal cancer risk was positively associated with intake of red and processed meat (highest [〉 160 g/day] versus lowest [〈 20 g/day] intake, HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.96 to 1.88; P-trend = .03) and inversely associated with intake of fish (〉 80 g/day versus 〈 10 g/day, HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.88; P-trend 〈 .001), but was not related to poultry intake. Correcting for measurement error strengthened the associations between colorectal cancer and red and processed meat intake (per 100-g increase HR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.41, P-trend = .001 and HR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.02, P-trend = .001 before and after calibration, respectively) and for fish (per 100 g increase HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.57 to 0.87, P-trend 〈 .001 and HR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.77, P-trend = .003; before and after correction, respectively). In this study population, the absolute risk of development of colorectal cancer within 10 years for a study subject aged 50 years was 1.71% for the highest category of red and processed meat intake and 1.28% for the lowest category of intake and was 1.86% for subjects in the lowest category of fish intake and 1.28% for subjects in the highest category of fish intake. Conclusions: Our data confirm that colorectal cancer risk is positively associated with high consumption of red and processed meat and support an inverse association with fish intake
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15956652
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; RISK ; DISTINCT ; MECHANISM ; HETEROCYCLIC AMINES ; mechanisms ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS ; Jun ; cholesterol ; DIET ; DIETARY ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; FOOD ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; NUTRIENTS ; FRAMEWORK ; RE ; CANCER DEVELOPMENT ; PRESERVATION ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; CANCER-RISK ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; NORTHERN ; processed meat ; 24-hour dietary recall ; ANIMAL PRODUCTS ; CHOLESTEROL OXIDATION ; cooking methods ; DONE RED MEAT
    Abstract: Objective: There is increasing evidence for a significant effect of processed meat (PM) intake on cancer risk. However, refined knowledge on how components of this heterogeneous food group are associated with cancer risk is still missing. Here, actual data on the intake of PM subcategories is given; within a food-based approach we considered preservation methods, cooking methods and nutrient content for stratification, in order to address most of the aetiologically relevant hypotheses. Design and setting: Standardised computerised 24-hour diet recall interviews were collected within the framework of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a prospective cohort study in 27 centres across 10 European countries. Subjects: Subjects were 22 924 women and 13 031 men aged 35 - 74 years. Results: Except for the so-called 'health-conscious' cohort in the UK, energy-adjusted total PM intake ranged between 11.1 and 47.9 g day(-1) in women and 18.8 and 88.5 g day(-1) in men. Ham, salami-type sausages and heated sausages contributed most to the overall PM intake. The intake of cured (addition of nitrate/nitrite) PM was highest in the German, Dutch and northern European EPIC centres, with up to 68.8 g day(-1) in men. The same was true for smoked PM (up to 51.8 g day(-1)). However, due to the different manufacturing practice, the highest average intake of NaNO2 through PM consumption was found for the Spanish centres (5.4 mg day(-1) in men) as compared with German and British centres. Spanish centres also showed the highest intake of NaCl-rich types of PM; most cholesterol- and iron-rich PM was consumed in central and northern European centres. Possibly hazardous cooking methods were more often used for PM preparation in central and northern European centres. Conclusions: We applied a food-based categorisation of PM that addresses aetiologically relevant mechanisms for cancer development and found distinct differences in dietary intake of these categories of PM across European cohorts. This predisposes EPIC to further investigate the role of PM in cancer aetiology
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16870017
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; validation ; BIOMARKERS ; hormone ; PLASMA ; COUNTRIES ; STABILITY ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; CALIBRATION ; carotenoids ; RE ; biomarker ; 24 h dietary recall ; 24-HOUR DIET RECALL ; EPIDEMIOLOGIC EVIDENCE ; food frequency questionnaires ; FRUITS ; fruits and vegetables ; SERUM CAROTENOIDS
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16160702
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; ALGORITHM ; ALGORITHMS ; COMMON ; NETWORK ; SYSTEM ; TOOL ; EXPOSURE ; COMPONENTS ; BIOMARKERS ; NO ; DESIGN ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; COMPONENT ; DATABASE ; DIETARY ; AD ; FUTURE ; PROJECT ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; MANAGEMENT ; GUIDELINES ; CHEMISTRY ; review ; WEIGHT ; 24-HOUR DIET RECALL ; analysis ; LOSSES ; prospective ; RECOMMENDATIONS ; STANDARDIZATION ; UNIT ; E ; SET ; WEIGHT CHANGE ; 24-h dietary recall ; ANALYSIS SYSTEMS ; DATA-BASE ; ENDB ; FOOD COMPOSITION DATABASES ; food composition tables ; nutrient databases ; NUTRITIONAL ANALYSIS
    Abstract: Objective: This paper describes the ad hoc methodological concepts and procedures developed to improve the comparability of Nutrient databases ( NDBs) across the 10 European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ( EPIC). This was required because there is currently no European reference NDB available. Design: A large network involving national compilers, nutritionists and experts on food chemistry and computer science was set up for the 'EPIC Nutrient DataBase' ( ENDB) project. A total of 550-1500 foods derived from about 37 000 standardized EPIC 24-h dietary recalls (24-HDRS) were matched as closely as possible to foods available in the 10 national NDBs. The resulting national data sets ( NDS) were then successively documented, standardized and evaluated according to common guidelines and using a DataBase Management System specifically designed for this project. The nutrient values of foods unavailable or not readily available in NDSs were approximated by recipe calculation, weighted averaging or adjustment for weight changes and vitamin/mineral losses, using common algorithms. Results: The final ENDB contains about 550-1500 foods depending on the country and 26 common components. Each component value was documented and standardized for unit, mode of expression, definition and chemical method of analysis, as far as possible. Furthermore, the overall completeness of NDSs was improved (〉= 99%), particularly for beta-carotene and vitamin E. Conclusion: The ENDB constitutes a first real attempt to improve the comparability of NDBs across European countries. This methodological work will provide a useful tool for nutritional research as well as end-user recommendations to improve NDBs in the future
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17375121
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