Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: CELLS ; tumor ; CELL ; Germany ; MICROSCOPY ; DIAGNOSIS ; NEW-YORK ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; ADHESION MOLECULES ; cell line ; COMPONENTS ; CONSTITUTIVE TRANSMEMBRANE GLYCOPROTEIN ; CULTURED-CELLS ; DESMOCOLLIN ; desmoplakin ; desmosome ; DIFFERENTIATION ; EPITHELIA ; HUMAN PLAKOGLOBIN ; INTERMEDIATE-SIZED FILAMENTS ; meninges,meningioma,desmosome,desmocollin 3 ; meningioma ; MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION ; MOLECULES ; MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY ; MR-165000 DESMOGLEIN ; NON-EPIDERMAL DESMOSOMES ; PLAQUE PROTEIN ; SUBDURAL SPACE ; TISSUE ; TUMORS
    Abstract: Intercellular junctions morphologically identical to epithelial desmosomes are known structures in meningiomas and arachnoidal tissue. Desmoplakin as one of the desmosomal plaque components has proven to be a reliable marker for diagnosis of meningeal tumors. Here we demonstrate by immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblot and reverse transcription-PCR reactions that cells of arachnoidal tissue, of diverse meningioma subtypes and of a meningioma-derived cell line contain the full complement of the typical desmosomal proteins desmoplakin (DP), plakophilin 2 (PP2), desmocollin 2 (Dsc2) and desmoglein 2 (Dsg2). Consequently, all these molecules are suitable for diagnostic applications of meningioma tumors. In addition to these constitutive desmosomal components, representative for single-layered (simple) epithelia, the dural border cells of the arachnoid and about 60% of the meningiomas tested were positive for desmocollin 3 (Dsc3), a protein in epithelia taken as an indicator for differentiation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12845453
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: CELLS ; tumor ; Germany ; human ; TOOL ; DIFFERENTIATION ; MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; HEART ; MESSENGER-RNA ; TISSUES ; CONTRAST ; ACID ; antibodies ; antibody ; immunohistochemistry ; MUSCLE ; EXCHANGE ; MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODIES ; STEM-CELLS ; ATROPHY ; INTERMEDIATE-FILAMENT PROTEINS ; MUSCULAR-DYSTROPHY ; MYASTHENIA-GRAVIS ; STRATIFIED EPITHELIA ; MYOPATHY ; IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS ; myopathies ; aberrant differentiation ; ACTIN ; SMOOTH-MUSCLE-CELLS ; rhabdomyosarcoma ; SARCOMAS ; CARDIOMYOCYTE DIFFERENTIATION ; HUMAN RHABDOMYOSARCOMA ; SATELLITE CELLS ; STRIATED-MUSCLE
    Abstract: The two sarcomeric isoforms of actins, cardiac and skeletal muscle alpha-actin, are highly homologous so that their immunohistochemical distinction is extremely difficult. Taking advantage of monoclonal antibodies distinguishing the two conservative amino acid exchanges near the aminoterminus, we have performed an extended immunohistochemical analysis of the cardiac alpha-actin (CAA) isoform in normal, regenerating, diseased and neoplastic human muscle tissues. Intense and uniform CAA staining is seen in fetal and adult myocardium and in fetal skeletal muscle while adult skeletal muscle is essentially negative, except for muscle spindle myocytes and a few scattered muscle fibres with overall reduced diameter. By contrast, CAA synthesis is markedly induced in regenerating skeletal muscle cells, in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and upon degenerative atrophy. CAA has also been detected in certain vascular and visceral smooth muscle cells. Among tumors, CAA has consistently been seen in rhabdomyosarcomas and rhabdomyomatous cells of nephroblastomas, whereas, smooth muscle tumors have shown only occasional staining. While the synthesis of this actin isoform is less restricted than previously thought, monoclonal antibodies against CAA provide a well-defined, reliable and sensitive diagnostic tool for the definition and detection of aberrant differentiation in diseased skeletal muscle and of striated muscle differentiation in rhabdomyosarcomas
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16715231
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...