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  • 1
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (R/M-SCCHN) overexpresses alphavbeta5 integrin. Cilengitide selectively inhibits alphavbeta3 and alphavbeta5 integrins and is investigated as a treatment strategy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The phase I/II study ADVANTAGE evaluated cilengitide combined with cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and cetuximab (PFE) in R/M-SCCHN. The phase II part reported here was an open-label, randomized, controlled trial investigating progression-free survival (PFS). Patients received up to six cycles of PFE alone or combined with cilengitide 2000 mg once (CIL1W) or twice (CIL2W) weekly. Thereafter, patients received maintenance therapy (cilengitide arms: cilengitide plus cetuximab; PFE-alone arm: cetuximab only) until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. RESULTS: One hundred and eighty-two patients were treated. Median PFS per investigator read was similar for CIL1W + PFE, CIL2W + PFE, and PFE alone (6.4, 5.6, and 5.7 months, respectively). Accordingly, median overall survival and objective response rates were not improved with cilengitide (12.4 months/47%, 10.6 months/27%, and 11.6 months/36%, respectively). No clinically meaningful safety differences were observed between groups. None of the tested biomarkers (expression of integrins, CD31, Ki-67, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, vascular endothelial-cadherin, type IV collagen, epidermal growth factor receptor, or p16 for human papillomavirus) were predictive of outcome. CONCLUSION: Neither of the cilengitide-containing regimens demonstrated a PFS benefit over PFE alone in R/M-SCCHN patients.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24567516
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  • 2
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: The etiologic role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) is well established. Nevertheless, information on survival differences by anatomic sub-site or treatment remains scarce, and it is still unclear the HPV-relatedness definition with best diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all patients diagnosed with a primary OPC in four Catalonian hospitals from 1990 to 2013. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancer tissues were subjected to histopathological evaluation, DNA quality control, HPV-DNA detection, and p16(INK4a)/pRb/p53/Cyclin-D1 immunohistochemistry. HPV-DNA positive and a random sample of HPV-DNA negative cases were subjected to HPV-E6*I mRNA detection. Demographic, tobacco/alcohol use, clinical and follow-up data were collected. Multivariate models were used to evaluate factors associated with HPV positivity as defined by four different HPV-relatedness definitions. Proportional-hazards models were used to compare the risk of death and recurrence among HPV-related and non-related OPC. RESULTS: 788 patients yielded a valid HPV-DNA result. The percentage of positive cases was 10.9%, 10.2%, 8.5% and 7.4% for p16(INK4a), HPV-DNA, HPV-DNA/HPV-E6*I mRNA, and HPV-DNA/p16(INK4a), respectively. Being non-smoker or non-drinker was consistently associated across HPV-relatedness definitions with HPV positivity. A suggestion of survival differences between anatomic sub-sites and treatments was observed. Double positivity for HPV-DNA/p16(INK4a) showed strongest diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value. CONCLUSIONS: Double positivity for HPV-DNA/p16(INK4a), a test that can be easily implemented in the clinical practice, has optimal diagnostic accuracy and prognostic value. Our results have strong clinical implications for patients' classification and handling and also suggest that not all the HPV-related OPC behave similarly.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 29496041
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-06-02
    Description: Purpose: The preplanned exploratory analysis of the BERIL-1 trial presented here aimed to identify biomarkers of response to the combination of buparlisib and paclitaxel. Patients and Methods: BERIL-1 was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study. Patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) progressing on/after one previous platinum-based chemotherapy regimen in the recurrent or metastatic setting were treated with either buparlisib plus paclitaxel or placebo plus paclitaxel. Archival tumor tissue and ctDNA samples were analyzed for molecular alterations and immune infiltration using next-generation sequencing or immunohistochemistry. Results: Biomarker analyses were performed in randomized patients ( n = 158) with available biomarker data. The most frequently (〉5%) mutated genes were TP53, FAT1, TET2, KMT2D, PIK3CA, NOTCH1, NFE2L2, NOTCH2, CCND1 , and CDKN2A . Patients with SCCHN tumors (from various primary sites) having HPV-negative status (HR = 0.51), TP53 alterations (HR = 0.55) or low mutational load (HR = 0.57) derived overall survival (OS) benefit with the combination of buparlisib and paclitaxel. OS benefit with this combination was also increased in patients with presence of intratumoral TILs ≥10% (HR = 0.51), stromal TILs ≥15% (HR = 0.53), intratumoral CD8-positive cells ≥5% (HR = 0.45), stromal CD8-positive cells ≥10% (HR = 0.47), or CD8-positive cells in invasive margins 〉25% (HR = 0.37). A trend for improved progression-free survival with the combination of buparlisib and paclitaxel was also observed in these patients. Conclusions: The BERIL-1 biomarker analyses showed that patients with TP53 alterations, HPV-negative status, low mutational load, or high infiltration of TILs or CD8-positive cells derived survival benefit with the combination of buparlisib and paclitaxel. Clin Cancer Res; 24(11); 2505–16. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
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