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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; IN-VITRO ; tumor ; CLINICAL-TRIAL ; human ; IN-VIVO ; MODEL ; liver ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; DRUG ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; MICE ; PATIENT ; SERA ; fibroblasts ; treatment ; MOUSE ; EFFICACY ; drug delivery ; CONJUGATE ; PHARMACOKINETICS ; BEARING RATS ; COLLAGEN-INDUCED ARTHRITIS ; FIBROBLAST-LIKE SYNOVIOCYTES ; LOW- DOSE METHOTREXATE ; SYNOVIAL FIBROBLASTS
    Abstract: We reported recently that albumin is a suitable drug carrier for targeted delivery of methotrexate (MTX) to tumors. Due to pathophysiological conditions in neoplastic tissue, high amounts of albumin accumulate in tumors and are metabolized by malignant cells. MTX, covalently coupled to human serum albumin (MTX-HSA) for cancer treatment, is currently being evaluated in phase II clinical trials. Because synovium of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) shares various features observed also in tumors, albumin-based drug targeting of inflamed joints might be an attractive therapeutic approach. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics of albumin and MTX in a mouse model of arthritis was examined. Additionally, uptake of albumin by synovial fibroblasts of RA patients and the efficacy of MTX and MTX-HSA in arthritic mice were studied. The results show that when compared with MTX, significantly higher amounts of albumin accumulate in inflamed paws, and significantly lower amounts of albumin are found in the liver and the kidneys. The protein is metabolized by human synovial fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo. MTX-HSA was significantly more effective in suppression of the onset of arthritis in mice than was MTX. In conclusion, albumin appears to be a suitable drug carrier in RA, most likely due to effects on synovial fibroblasts, which might increase therapeutic efficacy and reduce side effects of MTX
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12707361
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  • 2
    Keywords: evaluation ; Germany ; CLASSIFICATION ; CT ; DIAGNOSIS ; imaging ; INFORMATION ; TOOL ; VISUALIZATION ; DISEASE ; DRUG ; computed tomography ; RESOLUTION ; ARTHRITIS ; prognosis ; MRI ; QUANTITATION ; BIOLOGY ; MOLECULAR-BIOLOGY ; treatment ; FIELD ; MAGNETIC-RESONANCE ; magnetic resonance imaging ; STAGE ; EFFICACY ; MARKERS ; US ; tomography ; COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY ; inflammation ; rheumatoid arthritis,molecular markers,molecular imaging,radiological diagnostics,fluorescence imagi ; WRIST
    Abstract: Advances in molecular biology and technical developments in the field of imaging are increasingly allowing for non-invasive visualization and quantitation of biological processes at the molecular level. Such technologies, defined as molecular imaging, promise early diagnosis and improved classification of the stage and severity of disease, objective assessment of treatment efficacy, and reliable prognosis based on so-called molecular markers. Furthermore, molecular imaging is an important tool for the evaluation of physiological and pathophysiological processes and for drug development. Various different imaging modalities are available, such as conventional radiography (CR), computed tomography (CT), nuclear imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US), as well as other methods including fluorescence-based optical imaging. These methods differ with respect to resolution and their potential to gather information at the anatomical, physiological, cellular and molecular level. Therefore, the choice of the imaging modality for molecular imaging depends on the questions that need to be answered. This review discusses the potential of imaging modalities for molecular imaging in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 3
    Keywords: ultrasound ; SERIAL PERCUTANEOUS APPLICATION ; RAYNAUDS-PHENOMENON
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23191999
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