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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG ; EMPHYSEMA ; FOLLOW-UP ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; NETWORKS ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; DNA adducts ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; GENES ; TIME ; DNA ; AIR-POLLUTION ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; AGE ; REPAIR ; smoking ; leukemia ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; cancer risk ; DAMAGE ; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS ; DNA-DAMAGE ; RECRUITMENT ; ADDUCTS ; case-control studies ; EPIC ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; WHITE BLOOD-CELLS ; DNA-ADDUCTS ; case-control study ; DETERMINANTS ; monitoring ; GSTM1 ; LEVEL ; ADDUCT ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; DNA damage ; DNA ADDUCT ; ABILITY ; GENDER ; OUTDOOR AIR-POLLUTION ; OZONE
    Abstract: Objectives were to investigate prospectively the ability of DNA adducts to predict cancer and to study the determinants of adducts, especially air pollutants. DNA adducts were measured in a case-control study nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC investigation. Cases included newly diagnosed lung cancer (n = 115), upper respiratory cancers (pharynx and larynx, n 82), bladder cancer (n = 124), leukemia (n = 166), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or emphysema deaths (n = 77) accrued after a median follow-up of 7 years among the EPIC former smokers and never-smokers. Three controls per case were matched for questionnaire analyses and two controls per case for laboratory analyses. Matching criteria were gender, age, smoking status, country of recruitment, and follow-up time. Individual exposure to air pollution was assessed using concentration data from monitoring stations in routine air quality monitoring networks. Leukocyte DNA adducts were analyzed blindly using (32)p postlabeling technique. Adducts were associated with the subsequent risk of lung cancer, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.86 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.88-3.931 when comparing detectable versus nondetectable adducts. The association with lung cancer was stronger in never-smokers (OR, 4.04; 95% CI, 1.06-15.42) and among the younger age groups. After exclusion of the cancers occurring in the first 36 months of follow-up, the OR was 4.16 (95% CI, 1.24-13.88). A positive association was found between DNA adducts and ozone (O-3) concentration. Our prospective study suggests that leukocyte DNA adducts may predict lung cancer risk of never-smokers. Besides, the association of DNA adduct levels with O-3 indicates a possible role for photochemical smog in determining DNA damage
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16140979
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; LUNG ; FOLLOW-UP ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; DNA adducts ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; DNA ; CARCINOGENESIS ; AIR-POLLUTION ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; HUMANS ; DIFFERENCE ; REPAIR ; meta-analysis ; BLADDER ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; cancer risk ; DAMAGE ; LYMPHOCYTES ; DNA-DAMAGE ; ADDUCTS ; CARCINOGENS ; case-control studies ; HEALTHY ; SMOKERS ; WHITE BLOOD-CELLS ; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES ; DNA-ADDUCTS ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; INCREASE ; CARCINOGEN ; prospective studies ; LIFE ; METAANALYSIS ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; analysis ; DNA damage ; pooled analysis ; prospective ; prospective study ; ONSET ; COMPOUND ; CANCERS ; CANCER-RISK ; ENGLAND ; PREDICT ; POOLED-ANALYSIS ; HEAVY SMOKERS
    Abstract: Bulky DNA adducts are biomarkers of exposure to aromatic compounds and of the ability of the individual to metabolically activate carcinogens and to repair DNA damage. Their ability to predict cancer onset is uncertain. We have performed a pooled analysis of three prospective studies on cancer risk in which bulky DNA adducts have been measured in blood samples collected from healthy subjects (N = 1947; average follow-up 51-137 months). In addition, we have performed a meta-analysis by identifying all articles on the same subject published up to the end of 2006, including case-control studies. In the pooled analysis, a weakly statistically significant increase in the risk of lung cancer was apparent (14% per unit standard deviation change in adduct levels, 95% confidence interval 1-28%; using the weighted mean difference method, 0.15 SD, units higher adducts in cases than in controls). The association was evident only in current smokers and was absent in former smokers. Also the meta-analysis, which included both lung and bladder cancers, showed a statistically significant association in current smokers, whereas the results in never smokers were equivocal; in former smokers, no association was detected. The results of our pooled and meta-analyses suggest that bulky DNA adducts are associated with lung cancer arising in current smokers after a follow-up of several years
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18343884
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; CANCER CELLS ; CELLS ; BLOOD ; CELL ; human ; LUNG ; DIAGNOSIS ; FOLLOW-UP ; EXPOSURE ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; PATIENT ; DNA ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; HUMANS ; DESIGN ; PLASMA ; AGE ; MUTATION ; genetics ; smoking ; leukemia ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; PCR ; CANCER-CELLS ; MUTATIONS ; RECRUITMENT ; CANCER-PATIENTS ; ADDUCTS ; case-control studies ; CANCER PATIENTS ; nutrition ; MULTICENTER ; lung neoplasms ; TP53 ; ADULT ; prospective studies ; PROTOONCOGENE ; HEALTHY-SUBJECTS ; INTERVAL ; CANCER DEVELOPMENT ; prospective ; prospective study ; healthy subjects ; female ; Male ; CANCERS ; LIQUID ; EXPOSURES ; Aged ; Middle Aged ; CANCER-DIAGNOSIS ; Genes,p53 ; Longitudinal Studies ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins ; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms
    Abstract: In cancer patients, plasma often contains mutant DNA released by cancer cells. We have assessed the significance of plasma DNA mutations for subsequent cancer development in healthy subjects in a large longitudinal prospective study. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study was analyzed with a nested case-control design. Cases were nonsmokers or ex-smokers for 〉10 years and newly diagnosed with lung, bladder, or upper aerodigestive tract cancers or leukemia accrued after a median follow-up of 6.3 years. Controls were matched 2:1 for follow-up, age, sex, area of recruitment, and smoking status. KRAS2 mutations were detected by mutant-enriched PCR and sequencing (n = 1,098). TP53 mutations were detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography, temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis, and sequencing (n = 550). KRAS2 or TP53 mutations were detected in 13 of 1,098 (1.2%) and 20 of 550 (3.6%) subjects, respectively, 16 of whom developed cancer on average after 18.3 months of follow-up. Among 137 subjects who developed bladder cancer, 5 had KRAS2 mutations [odds ratio (OR), 4.25; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.27-14.15] and 7 had TP53 mutations (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 0.66-4.97). There was a nonsignificant trend for association between TP53 mutations and bulky adducts in lymphocyte DNA (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 0.64-12.17). This is the first report of TP53 or KRAS2 mutations in the plasma of healthy subjects in a prospective study, suggesting that KRAS2 mutation is detectable ahead of bladder cancer diagnosis. TP53 mutation may be associated with environmental exposures. These observations have implications for monitoring early steps of carcinogenesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16818665
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; DNA adducts ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; DNA ; BIOMARKERS ; colon ; RATS ; CONTRAST ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; BLADDER-CANCER ; cancer risk ; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS ; COLON-CANCER ; MULTIVARIATE ; ADDUCTS ; CARCINOGENS ; DIET ; DIETARY ; ALCOHOL ; EPIC ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; FOOD ; GUIDELINES ; VITAMIN-E ; DNA-ADDUCTS ; REGRESSION ; air pollution ; prospective studies ; N-NITROSAMINES ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; analysis ; prospective ; prospective study ; correlation ; BMI ; CANCER-RISK ; ENGLAND ; non-smokers ; AMINE ; gastrointestinal ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; fibre intake ; haemoglobin adducts ; RESISTANT STARCH
    Abstract: In contrast to some extensively examined food mutagens, for example, aflatoxins, N-nitrosamines and heterocyclic amines, some other food contaminants, in particular polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and other aromatic compounds, have received less attention. Therefore, exploring the relationships between dietary habits and the levels of biomarkers related to exposure to aromatic compounds is highly relevant. We have investigated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort the association between dietary items (food groups and nutrients) and aromatic DNA adducts and 4-aminobiphenyl-Hb adducts. Both types of adducts are biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and possibly of cancer risk, and were measured, respectively, in leucocytes and erythrocytes of 1086 (DNA adducts) and 190 (Hb adducts) non-smokers. An inverse. statistically significant, association has been found between DNA adduct levels and dietary fibre intake (P=0.02), vitamin E (P =0.04) and alcohol (P=0.03) but not with other nutrients or food groups. Also, an inverse association between fibre and fruit intake, and BMI and 4-aminobiphenyl-Hb adducts (P=0.03, 0.04, and 0.03 respectively) was observed. After multivariate regression analysis these inverse correlations remained statistically significant, except for the correlation adducts v. fruit intake. The present study suggests that fibre intake in the usual range can modify the level of DNA or Hb aromatic adducts, but Such role seems to be quantitatively modest. Fibres could reduce the formation of DNA adducts in different manners, by diluting potential food mutagens and carcinogens in the gastrointestinal tract, by speeding their transit through the colon and by binding carcinogenic substances
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18275627
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