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    Keywords: CANCER ; human ; CT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; INFECTION ; SKIN ; papillomavirus ; VARIANTS ; virus ; carcinogenicity ; PROGRESSION ; WOMEN ; etiology ; smoking ; cervical cancer ; CERVICAL-CANCER ; CERVIX ; PATHOGENESIS ; human papillomavirus ; HPV ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS ; DIETARY ; TOBACCO ; UTERINE CERVIX ; HERPES-SIMPLEX-VIRUS ; TYPE-2 ; INVASIVE CERVICAL-CANCER ; SKIN-CANCER ; INTEGRATION ; WORLDWIDE ; VARIANT ; HUMAN CANCER ; HIV ; COLLABORATIVE REANALYSIS ; CANCERS ; PERSPECTIVE ; HERPES-SIMPLEX ; nonmelanoma skin cancer ; LONG-TERM USE ; CONTRACEPTIVES ; herpes simplex virus ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS TYPES ; INDIVIDUAL DATA
    Abstract: The causal role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in all cancers of the uterine cervix has been firmly established biologically and epidemiologically. Most cancers of the vagina and anus are likewise caused by HPV, as are a fraction of cancers of the vulva, penis, and oropharynx. HPV-16 and -18 account for about 70% of cancers of the cervix, vagina, and anus and for about 30-40% of cancers of the vulva, penis, and oropharynx. Other cancers causally linked to HPV are non-melanoma skin cancer and cancer of the conjunctiva. Although HPV is a necessary cause of cervical cancer, it is not a sufficient cause. Thus, other cofactors are necessary for progression from cervical HPV infection to cancer. Long-term use of hormonal contraceptives, high parity, tobacco smoking, and co-infection with HIV have been identified as established cofactors; co-infection with Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2), immunosuppression, and certain dietary deficiencies are other probable cofactors. Genetic and immunological host factors and viral factors other than type, such as variants of type, viral load and viral integration, are likely to be important but have not been clearly identified. (c) 2006 Published by Elsevier Ltd
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16949995
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; DISEASE ; GENE ; PROTEIN ; INFECTION ; ASSOCIATION ; ESCHERICHIA-COLI ; PRECANCEROUS LESIONS ; COMPLETE GENOME SEQUENCE ; VIRULENCE FACTORS ; CAG-PATHOGENICITY ISLAND ; CODON USAGE BIAS ; IV SECRETION SYSTEM
    Abstract: Helicobacter pylori (HP) is a bacterium that colonizes the human stomach and can establish a long-term infection of the gastric mucosa. Persistent Hp infection often induces gastritis and is associated with the development of peptic ulcer disease, atrophic gastritis, and gastric adenocarcinoma. Virulent HP isolates harbor the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes) pathogenicity island (cagPAI), a 40 kb stretch of DNA that encodes components of a type IV secretion system (T4SS). This T4SS forms a pilus for the injection of virulence factors into host target cells, such as the CagA oncoprotein. We analyzed the genetic variability in cagA and other selected genes of the HP cagPAI (cagC, cagE, cagL, cagT, cagV and cag Gamma) using DNA extracted from frozen gastric biopsies or from clinical isolates. Study subjects were 95 cagA+ patients that were histologically diagnosed with chronic gastritis or gastric cancer in Venezuela and Mexico, areas with high prevalence of Hp infection. Sequencing reactions were carried out by both Sanger and next-generation pyrosequencing (454 Roche) methods. We found a total of 381 variants with unambiguous calls observed in at least 10% of the originally tested samples and reference strains. We compared the frequencies of these genetic variants between gastric cancer and chronic gastritis cases. Twenty-six SNPs (11 non-synonymous and 14 synonymous) showed statistically significant differences (P〈0.05), and two SNPs, in position 1039 and 1041 of cagE, showed a highly significant association with cancer (p-value = 2.07x10), and the variant codon was located in the VirB3 homology domain of Agrobacterium. The results of this study may provide preliminary information to target antibiotic treatment to high-risk individuals, if effects of these variants are confirmed in further investigations.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22235308
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  • 4
    Keywords: IN-SITU ; NEOPLASIA ; ASSAY ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; HEAD ; VACCINE ; PREVALENCE ; TRENDS ; NECK-CANCER
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV) contribution in vulvar intraepithelial lesions (VIN) and invasive vulvar cancer (IVC) is not clearly established. This study provides novel data on HPV markers in a large series of VIN and IVC lesions. METHODS: Histologically confirmed VIN and IVC from 39 countries were assembled at the Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO). HPV-DNA detection was done by polymerase chain reaction using SPF-10 broad-spectrum primers and genotyping by reverse hybridisation line probe assay (LiPA25) (version 1). IVC cases were tested for p16(INK4a) by immunohistochemistry (CINtec histology kit, ROCHE). An IVC was considered HPV driven if both HPV-DNA and p16(INK4a) overexpression were observed simultaneously. Data analyses included algorithms allocating multiple infections to calculate type-specific contribution and logistic regression models to estimate adjusted prevalence (AP) and its 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Of 2296 cases, 587 were VIN and 1709 IVC. HPV-DNA was detected in 86.7% and 28.6% of the cases respectively. Amongst IVC cases, 25.1% were both HPV-DNA and p16(INK4a) positive. IVC cases were largely keratinising squamous cell carcinoma (KSCC) (N=1234). Overall prevalence of HPV related IVC cases was highest in younger women for any histological subtype. SCC with warty or basaloid features (SCC_WB) (N=326) were more likely to be HPV and p16(INK4a) positive (AP=69.5%, CI=63.6-74.8) versus KSCC (AP=11.5%, CI=9.7-13.5). HPV 16 was the commonest type (72.5%) followed by HPV 33 (6.5%) and HPV 18 (4.6%). Enrichment from VIN to IVC was significantly high for HPV 45 (8.5-fold). CONCLUSION: Combined data from HPV-DNA and p16(INK4a) testing are likely to represent a closer estimate of the real fraction of IVC induced by HPV. Our results indicate that HPV contribution in invasive vulvar cancer has probably been overestimated. HPV 16 remains the major player worldwide.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23886586
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  • 5
    Keywords: POPULATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; BLADDER-CANCER ; STOMACH-CANCER ; PRECANCEROUS LESIONS ; STEM-CELL ANTIGEN ; METAANALYSIS ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; VENEZUELA
    Abstract: SNPs in the Prostate Stem Cell Antigen (PSCA) gene have been found associated with gastric cancer (GC) risk in a genome-wide association study. This association has been replicated in several populations. In this study we assessed the impact of PSCA genotype on the risk of advanced gastric precancerous lesions and GC. We used baseline gastric histopathology data and DNA from frozen gastric biopsies of 2045 subjects enrolled in a chemoprevention trial for gastric precancerous lesions in Venezuela, and 180 cases of GC from the same area. We analyzed 3 SNPs in the PSCA gene (rs2294008, rs9297976 and rs12155758) which were previously found to be associated with GC risk in Europeans. The T allele of rs2294008 was found to be associated with a higher prevalence of atrophic gastritis (OR = 1.44; 95% CI 1.03-2.01 for the dominant model) and intestinal metaplasia (OR = 1.50; 95% CI 1.13-1.98 for the dominant model). We also confirmed the association with higher risk of gastric cancer (OR = 2.34; 95% CI 1.36-4.01 for the allele carriers). SNP rs12155758 was not associated with risk of gastric preneoplastic lesions, but we confirmed its association with higher GC risk (OR 1.95; 95% CI 1.29-2.97 for dominant model). We tested the relevance of the presence of the Helicobacter pylori cagA gene, which is known to increase the risk of more severe gastric lesions, but we did not find any clearcut interaction with PSCA SNPs in defining risk of gastric precancerous lesions or cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24023815
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPOSURE ; POPULATION ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; adenocarcinoma ; PREVALENCE ; METAANALYSIS ; VULVA ; GENOTYPE ATTRIBUTION ; DIETHYLSTILBESTROL
    Abstract: AIM: This work describes the human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and the HPV type distribution in a large series of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) grades 2/3 and vaginal cancer worldwide. METHODS: We analysed 189 VAIN 2/3 and 408 invasive vaginal cancer cases collected from 31 countries from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of sectioned formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and typing was performed using the SPF-10/DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 146 vaginal cancers was tested for p16INK4a expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance. RESULTS: HPV DNA was detected in 74% (95% confidence interval (CI): 70-78%) of invasive cancers and in 96% (95% CI: 92-98%) of VAIN 2/3. Among cancers, the highest detection rates were observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, and in younger ages. Concerning the type-specific distribution, HPV16 was the most frequently type detected in both precancerous and cancerous lesions (59%). p16INK4a overexpression was found in 87% of HPV DNA positive vaginal cancer cases. CONCLUSIONS: HPV was identified in a large proportion of invasive vaginal cancers and in almost all VAIN 2/3. HPV16 was the most common type detected. A large impact in the reduction of the burden of vaginal neoplastic lesions is expected among vaccinated cohorts.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25155250
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; tumor ; BLOOD ; CELL ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COMMON ; RISK ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; TUMORS ; PATIENT ; DNA ; MECHANISM ; E7 ; papillomavirus ; ASSOCIATION ; antibodies ; antibody ; ASSAY ; PLASMA ; etiology ; cervical cancer ; CERVICAL-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; PCR ; cancer risk ; RISK FACTOR ; human papillomavirus ; HPV ; E6 ; HPV16 ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; HEAD ; POLYMERASE-CHAIN-REACTION ; case-control studies ; TOBACCO ; L1 ; POLYMERASE CHAIN-REACTION ; SMOKERS ; EARLY PROTEINS ; HPV TYPE-16 ; INTERVIEW ; INVASIVE CERVICAL-CANCER ; MULTICENTER ; NECK CANCERS ; ORAL CAVITY ; RAPID DETECTION ; TONSILLAR CARCINOMAS
    Abstract: Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV), the causal agent of cervical cancer, appears to be involved in the etiology of cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx. To investigate these associations, we conducted a multicenter case-control study of cancer of the oral cavity and oropharynx in nine countries. Methods: We recruited 1670 case patients (1415 with cancer of the oral cavity and 255 with cancer of the oropharynx) and 1732 control subjects and obtained an interview, oral exfoliated cells, and blood from all participants and fresh biopsy specimens from case patients. HPV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Antibodies against HPV16 L1, E6, and E7 proteins in plasma were detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Multivariable models were used for case-control and case-case comparisons. Results: HPV DNA was detected in biopsy specimens of 3.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.5% to 5.3%) of 766 cancers of the oral cavity with valid PCR results and 18.3% (95% CI = 12.0% to 24.7%) of 142 cancers of the oropharynx (oropharynx and tonsil combined) with valid PCR results. HPV DNA in cancer biopsy specimens was detected less frequently among tobacco smokers and paan chewers and more frequently among subjects who reported more than one sexual partner or who practiced oral sex. HPV16 DNA was found in 94.7% of HPV DNA-positive case patients. HPV DNA in exfoliated cells was not associated with cancer risk or with HPV DNA detection in biopsy specimens. Antibodies against HPV16 L1 were associated with risk for cancers of the oral cavity (odds ratio [OR] = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1 to 2.1) and the oropharynx (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 2.1 to 5.9). Antibodies against HPV16 E6 or E7 were also associated with risk for cancers of the oral cavity (OR = 2.9, 95% CI = 1.7 to 4.8) and the oropharynx (OR = 9.2. 95% CI = 4.8 to 17.7). Conclusions: HPV appears to play an etiologic role in many cancers of the oropharynx and possibly a small subgroup of cancers of the oral cavity. The most common HPV type in genital cancers (HPV16) was also the most common in these tumors. The mechanism of transmission of HPV to the oral cavity warrants further investigation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14652239
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  • 8
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; Germany ; POPULATION ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; NITRIC-OXIDE SYNTHASE ; INFECTION ; CARCINOGENESIS ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; NO ; PROMOTER ; RATES ; VARIABILITY ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; INTERFERON-GAMMA ; inflammation ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; SNPs ; GRADE ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI INFECTION ; USA ; nitric oxide synthase ; cyclooxygenase ; PROMOTER VARIANT ; Helicobacter pylori ; HIGH-RISK POPULATION ; VENEZUELA ; NUCLEOTIDE ; ANTRUM ; gastric premalignant lesions ; interferon gamma ; VACA
    Abstract: Chronic inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori is a key process in gastric carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms in important mediators of H. pylori-induced inflammation may influence the risk of developing various grades of precancerous lesions. We studied the associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cyclooxygenase 1 and 2 (PTGS1 and PTGS2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2A), interferon gamma (IFNG) and its receptor (IFNGR1), and risk of gastric precancerous lesions in a Venezuelan population characterized by high rates of H. pylori infection. We found no association of precancerous lesions with SNPs in PTGS1 and in IFNG. A nonsynonymous SNP of NOS2A (Ser608Leu) and an SNP located in the promoter of IFNGR1 (C-56T) were associated with higher risk of atrophic gastritis [odds ratio (OR)= 1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.01-1.86, and OR=1.49, 95% CI=1.01-2.19, respectively]. Two SNPs; of PTGS2 were associated with risk of dysplasia (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.01 -2.54, and OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.43-0.99). We conclude that genetic variability in the genes we studied does not play a major role in the early stages of gastric carcinogenesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18287876
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  • 9
    Keywords: POPULATION ; ASSOCIATION ; antibodies ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; SEROPREVALENCE ; GROUP ALLELES ; ANTIGEN-BINDING ADHESIN ; SECRETOR STATUS ; IV SECRETION ; LEWIS
    Abstract: A higher incidence of stomach cancer in ABO blood type A individuals than in those with blood type O has been known for a long time. We studied this association in relation to Helicobacter pylori (Hp) of different cagA status. For our study, we used baseline gastric histopathology data and DNAs from frozen gastric biopsies of 2,077 subjects enrolled in a chemoprevention trial for gastric precancerous lesions in Venezuela. We analyzed six single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ABO gene, and we assessed the presence of the Hp cagA gene. Odds ratios (ORs) for risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions were calculated using individuals with normal gastric epithelium or non-atrophic gastritis as a reference. Among individuals carrying a cagA negative Hp infection or no Hp infection, those with blood type A had a lower risk of intestinal metaplasia (IM) and dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=0.60; 95% CI 0.38-0.94). In carriers of cagA positive Hp strains, individuals with blood type A had a higher risk of IM or dysplasia than those with blood type O (OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.09-1.86) and a higher risk if compared to subjects carrying cagA negative strain and non-A blood group (OR=3.82, 95% CI=2.80-5.20). The interaction between Hp cagA status and blood type was statistically significant (p=0.0006). We showed that SNPs in the ABO gene, predictive of ABO blood groups, are associated with risk of advanced precancerous gastric lesions in individuals infected with Hp, but the assessment of the risk is strictly dependent on cagA status.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23319424
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  • 10
    Keywords: CELLS ; RISK ; INFECTION ; LESIONS ; CERVICAL-CANCER ; intraepithelial neoplasia ; METAANALYSIS ; HIV ; VULVA ; GENOTYPE ATTRIBUTION
    Abstract: Knowledge about human papillomaviruses (HPV) types involved in anal cancers in some world regions is scanty. Here, we describe the HPV DNA prevalence and type distribution in a series of invasive anal cancers and anal intraepithelial neoplasias (AIN) grades 2/3 from 24 countries. We analyzed 43 AIN 2/3 cases and 496 anal cancers diagnosed from 1986 to 2011. After histopathological evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples, HPV DNA detection and genotyping was performed using SPF-10/DEIA/LiPA25 system (version 1). A subset of 116 cancers was further tested for p16(INK4a) expression, a cellular surrogate marker for HPV-associated transformation. Prevalence ratios were estimated using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance in the anal cancer data set. HPV DNA was detected in 88.3% of anal cancers (95% confidence interval [CI]: 85.1-91.0%) and in 95.3% of AIN 2/3 (95% CI: 84.2-99.4%). Among cancers, the highest prevalence was observed in warty-basaloid subtype of squamous cell carcinomas, in younger patients and in North American geographical region. There were no statistically significant differences in prevalence by gender. HPV16 was the most frequent HPV type detected in both cancers (80.7%) and AIN 2/3 lesions (75.4%). HPV18 was the second most common type in invasive cancers (3.6%). p16(INK4a) overexpression was found in 95% of HPV DNA-positive anal cancers. In view of the results of HPV DNA and high proportion of p16(INK4a) overexpression, infection by HPV is most likely to be a necessary cause for anal cancers in both men and women. The large contribution of HPV16 reinforces the potential impact of HPV vaccines in the prevention of these lesions.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24817381
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