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  • 1
    Keywords: Medicine ; Oncology ; Pharmaceutical technology ; Biomedicine ; Cancer Research ; Oncology ; Pharmaceutical Sciences/Technology ; Springer eBooks
    Description / Table of Contents: Introduction -- Etiology -- Current diagnosis and treatment options for HCC -- Pathophysiology of HCC -- Molecular mechanisms of HCC -- Animal models of liver cancer -- Novel therapeutic strategies to combat HCC -- Conclusions
    Abstract: This book provides up-to-date information on the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with a review of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the disease process. Recent research in HCC has led to significant progress in our understanding of the cellular processes and molecular mechanisms that occur during multi-stage events that lead to hepatocarcinogenesis. The emergence of micro RNAs and molecular targeted therapies have added a new dimension in our efforts to combat this deadly disease, Chapters include discussion and evaluation of current intervention strategies and therapeutic options and a focus on the novel approaches that are being pursued, such as micro-RNA based therapies and personalized medicine to treat liver cancer. This book will be of interest to basic and clinical researchers, as well as to drug developers
    Pages: VI, 69 p. 2 illus. in color. : online resource.
    ISBN: 9783319094144
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-02-20
    Description: Allelic differences between the two homologous chromosomes can affect the propensity of inheritance in humans; however, the extent of such differences in the human genome has yet to be fully explored. Here we delineate allelic chromatin modifications and transcriptomes among a broad set of human tissues, enabled by a chromosome-spanning haplotype reconstruction strategy. The resulting large collection of haplotype-resolved epigenomic maps reveals extensive allelic biases in both chromatin state and transcription, which show considerable variation across tissues and between individuals, and allow us to investigate cis-regulatory relationships between genes and their control sequences. Analyses of histone modification maps also uncover intriguing characteristics of cis-regulatory elements and tissue-restricted activities of repetitive elements. The rich data sets described here will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms by which cis-regulatory elements control gene expression programs.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4449149/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4449149/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Leung, Danny -- Jung, Inkyung -- Rajagopal, Nisha -- Schmitt, Anthony -- Selvaraj, Siddarth -- Lee, Ah Young -- Yen, Chia-An -- Lin, Shin -- Lin, Yiing -- Qiu, Yunjiang -- Xie, Wei -- Yue, Feng -- Hariharan, Manoj -- Ray, Pradipta -- Kuan, Samantha -- Edsall, Lee -- Yang, Hongbo -- Chi, Neil C -- Zhang, Michael Q -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Ren, Bing -- ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- F32 HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- F32HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99 HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES024984/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM008666/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Feb 19;518(7539):350-4. doi: 10.1038/nature14217.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Department of Genetics, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, M-344 Stanford, California 94305, USA [2] Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University, Falk Building, 870 Quarry Road Stanford, California 94304, USA. ; 1] Department of Genetics, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, M-344 Stanford, California 94305, USA [2] Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid Ave, Campus Box 8109, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; Tsinghua University-Peking University Center for Life Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, The Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, Pennsylvania 17033, USA. ; Genomic Analysis Laboratory, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Biological Sciences, Center for Systems Biology, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92093-0613, USA. ; 1] Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of California, San Diego, California 92093-0613, USA [2] Institute of Genomic Medicine, University of California, San Diego, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Biological Sciences, Center for Systems Biology, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080, USA [2] Bioinformatics Division, Center for Synthetic and Systems Biology, TNLIST Tsinghua National Laboratory for Information Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; 1] Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Institute of Genomic Medicine, University of California, San Diego, California 92093, USA [3] Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [4] UCSD Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25693566" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acetylation ; *Alleles ; Chromatin/genetics/metabolism ; Chromosomes, Human/genetics ; Datasets as Topic ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic/*genetics ; *Epigenomics ; Genetic Variation/genetics ; Haplotypes/*genetics ; Histones/metabolism ; Humans ; Nucleotide Motifs ; Organ Specificity/genetics ; Transcription, Genetic/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-02-20
    Description: Higher-order chromatin structure is emerging as an important regulator of gene expression. Although dynamic chromatin structures have been identified in the genome, the full scope of chromatin dynamics during mammalian development and lineage specification remains to be determined. By mapping genome-wide chromatin interactions in human embryonic stem (ES) cells and four human ES-cell-derived lineages, we uncover extensive chromatin reorganization during lineage specification. We observe that although self-associating chromatin domains are stable during differentiation, chromatin interactions both within and between domains change in a striking manner, altering 36% of active and inactive chromosomal compartments throughout the genome. By integrating chromatin interaction maps with haplotype-resolved epigenome and transcriptome data sets, we find widespread allelic bias in gene expression correlated with allele-biased chromatin states of linked promoters and distal enhancers. Our results therefore provide a global view of chromatin dynamics and a resource for studying long-range control of gene expression in distinct human cell lineages.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4515363/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4515363/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Dixon, Jesse R -- Jung, Inkyung -- Selvaraj, Siddarth -- Shen, Yin -- Antosiewicz-Bourget, Jessica E -- Lee, Ah Young -- Ye, Zhen -- Kim, Audrey -- Rajagopal, Nisha -- Xie, Wei -- Diao, Yarui -- Liang, Jing -- Zhao, Huimin -- Lobanenkov, Victor V -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Thomson, James A -- Ren, Bing -- R01 ES024984/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007198/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Feb 19;518(7539):331-6. doi: 10.1038/nature14222.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0653, USA [2] Medical Scientist Training Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0653, USA. ; 1] Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0653, USA [2] Bioinformatics and Systems Biology Graduate Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; The Morgridge Institute for Research, 309 North Orchard Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53715, USA. ; Tsinghua University-Peking University Center for Life Sciences, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Laboratory of Immunogenetics, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Twinbrook I NIAID Facility, Room 1417, 5640 Fishers Lane, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] The Morgridge Institute for Research, 309 North Orchard Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53715, USA [2] Department of Cell and Regenerative Biology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA [3] Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106, USA. ; 1] Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0653, USA [2] University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institute of Genomic Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0653, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25693564" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Allelic Imbalance/genetics ; *Cell Differentiation/genetics ; Cell Lineage/genetics ; Chromatin/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; *Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly/genetics ; Embryonic Stem Cells/*cytology/*metabolism ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic/*genetics ; Epigenomics ; Gene Regulatory Networks ; Humans ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics ; Reproducibility of Results
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-06-02
    Description: Understanding the diversity of human tissues is fundamental to disease and requires linking genetic information, which is identical in most of an individual's cells, with epigenetic mechanisms that could have tissue-specific roles. Surveys of DNA methylation in human tissues have established a complex landscape including both tissue-specific and invariant methylation patterns. Here we report high coverage methylomes that catalogue cytosine methylation in all contexts for the major human organ systems, integrated with matched transcriptomes and genomic sequence. By combining these diverse data types with each individuals' phased genome, we identified widespread tissue-specific differential CG methylation (mCG), partially methylated domains, allele-specific methylation and transcription, and the unexpected presence of non-CG methylation (mCH) in almost all human tissues. mCH correlated with tissue-specific functions, and using this mark, we made novel predictions of genes that escape X-chromosome inactivation in specific tissues. Overall, DNA methylation in several genomic contexts varies substantially among human tissues.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499021/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499021/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schultz, Matthew D -- He, Yupeng -- Whitaker, John W -- Hariharan, Manoj -- Mukamel, Eran A -- Leung, Danny -- Rajagopal, Nisha -- Nery, Joseph R -- Urich, Mark A -- Chen, Huaming -- Lin, Shin -- Lin, Yiing -- Jung, Inkyung -- Schmitt, Anthony D -- Selvaraj, Siddarth -- Ren, Bing -- Sejnowski, Terrence J -- Wang, Wei -- Ecker, Joseph R -- F32 HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- F32HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99 HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99 NS080911/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- K99HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R00 NS080911/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R00NS080911/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES024984/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM008666/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 9;523(7559):212-6. doi: 10.1038/nature14465. Epub 2015 Jun 1.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Bioinformatics Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Genomic Analysis Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Computational Neurobiology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Department of Cognitive Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, M-344 Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8109, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; Bioinformatics Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institute of Genomic Medicine, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Computational Neurobiology Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Division of Biological Sciences, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA [2] Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26030523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Age Factors ; Alleles ; Chromosome Mapping ; *DNA Methylation ; *Epigenesis, Genetic ; Female ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Genetic Variation ; Humans ; Male ; Organ Specificity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-02-20
    Description: The reference human genome sequence set the stage for studies of genetic variation and its association with human disease, but epigenomic studies lack a similar reference. To address this need, the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium generated the largest collection so far of human epigenomes for primary cells and tissues. Here we describe the integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes generated as part of the programme, profiled for histone modification patterns, DNA accessibility, DNA methylation and RNA expression. We establish global maps of regulatory elements, define regulatory modules of coordinated activity, and their likely activators and repressors. We show that disease- and trait-associated genetic variants are enriched in tissue-specific epigenomic marks, revealing biologically relevant cell types for diverse human traits, and providing a resource for interpreting the molecular basis of human disease. Our results demonstrate the central role of epigenomic information for understanding gene regulation, cellular differentiation and human disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4530010/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4530010/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium -- Kundaje, Anshul -- Meuleman, Wouter -- Ernst, Jason -- Bilenky, Misha -- Yen, Angela -- Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza -- Kheradpour, Pouya -- Zhang, Zhizhuo -- Wang, Jianrong -- Ziller, Michael J -- Amin, Viren -- Whitaker, John W -- Schultz, Matthew D -- Ward, Lucas D -- Sarkar, Abhishek -- Quon, Gerald -- Sandstrom, Richard S -- Eaton, Matthew L -- Wu, Yi-Chieh -- Pfenning, Andreas R -- Wang, Xinchen -- Claussnitzer, Melina -- Liu, Yaping -- Coarfa, Cristian -- Harris, R Alan -- Shoresh, Noam -- Epstein, Charles B -- Gjoneska, Elizabeta -- Leung, Danny -- Xie, Wei -- Hawkins, R David -- Lister, Ryan -- Hong, Chibo -- Gascard, Philippe -- Mungall, Andrew J -- Moore, Richard -- Chuah, Eric -- Tam, Angela -- Canfield, Theresa K -- Hansen, R Scott -- Kaul, Rajinder -- Sabo, Peter J -- Bansal, Mukul S -- Carles, Annaick -- Dixon, Jesse R -- Farh, Kai-How -- Feizi, Soheil -- Karlic, Rosa -- Kim, Ah-Ram -- Kulkarni, Ashwinikumar -- Li, Daofeng -- Lowdon, Rebecca -- Elliott, GiNell -- Mercer, Tim R -- Neph, Shane J -- Onuchic, Vitor -- Polak, Paz -- Rajagopal, Nisha -- Ray, Pradipta -- Sallari, Richard C -- Siebenthall, Kyle T -- Sinnott-Armstrong, Nicholas A -- Stevens, Michael -- Thurman, Robert E -- Wu, Jie -- Zhang, Bo -- Zhou, Xin -- Beaudet, Arthur E -- Boyer, Laurie A -- De Jager, Philip L -- Farnham, Peggy J -- Fisher, Susan J -- Haussler, David -- Jones, Steven J M -- Li, Wei -- Marra, Marco A -- McManus, Michael T -- Sunyaev, Shamil -- Thomson, James A -- Tlsty, Thea D -- Tsai, Li-Huei -- Wang, Wei -- Waterland, Robert A -- Zhang, Michael Q -- Chadwick, Lisa H -- Bernstein, Bradley E -- Costello, Joseph F -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Hirst, Martin -- Meissner, Alexander -- Milosavljevic, Aleksandar -- Ren, Bing -- Stamatoyannopoulos, John A -- Wang, Ting -- Kellis, Manolis -- 5R24HD000836/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- F32 HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- F32HL110473/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99 HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K99HL119617/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01 DA008227/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- P30AG10161/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- P50 MH096890/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG015819/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG017917/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES024984/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R01 ES024992/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004037/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007175/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007354/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01AG15819/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01AG17917/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01HG004037/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01HG004037-S1/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01NS078839/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- RC1HG005334/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- RF1 AG015819/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- T32 ES007032/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007198/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007266/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM081739/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017154/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01AG46152/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- U01DA025956/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017154/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017155/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017156/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- U01ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Feb 19;518(7539):317-30. doi: 10.1038/nature14248.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Department of Genetics, Department of Computer Science, 300 Pasteur Dr., Lane Building, L301, Stanford, California 94305-5120, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Department of Biological Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, 615 Charles E Young Dr South, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, 7 Divinity Ave, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. ; Epigenome Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institute of Genomic Medicine, Moores Cancer Center, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Genomic Analysis Laboratory, Howard Hughes Medical Institute &The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 N. Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, 3720 15th Ave. NE, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Biology Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 31 Ames St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 43 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; 1] Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institute of Genomic Medicine, Moores Cancer Center, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. [2] Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; Department of Neurosurgery, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, 1450 3rd Street, San Francisco, California 94158, USA. ; Department of Pathology, University of California San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, California 94143-0511, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Genetics, University of Washington, 2211 Elliot Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98121, USA. ; 1] Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 32 Vassar St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. [2] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [3] Department of Computer Science &Engineering, University of Connecticut, 371 Fairfield Way, Storrs, Connecticut 06269, USA. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Centre for High-Throughput Biology, University of British Columbia, 2125 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada. ; Bioinformatics Group, Department of Molecular Biology, Division of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac 102a, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. ; Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Center for Systems Biology, The University of Texas, Dallas, NSERL, RL10, 800 W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080, USA. ; Department of Genetics, Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University in St Louis, 4444 Forest Park Ave, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. ; Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Brigham &Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Department of Genetics, Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University in St Louis, 4444 Forest Park Ave, St Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. [2] Department of Computer Science and Engineeering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, USA. ; 1] Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3600, USA. [2] Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA. ; Molecular and Human Genetics Department, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Biology Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 31 Ames St, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Brigham &Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. [3] Harvard Medical School, 25 Shattuck St, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 1450 Biggy Street, Los Angeles, California 90089-9601, USA. ; ObGyn, Reproductive Sciences, University of California San Francisco, 35 Medical Center Way, San Francisco, California 94143, USA. ; Center for Biomolecular Sciences and Engineering, University of Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA. ; 1] Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. [2] Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6, Canada. [3] Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, 2329 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V6T 1Z4. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. [2] Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, 2329 West Mall, Vancouver, BC, Canada, V6T 1Z4. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Diabetes Center, University of California, San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave, San Francisco, California 94143-0534, USA. ; 1] University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53715, USA. [2] Morgridge Institute for Research, 330 N. Orchard Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53707, USA. ; USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, 1100 Bates Street, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Center for Systems Biology, The University of Texas, Dallas, NSERL, RL10, 800 W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080, USA. [2] Bioinformatics Division, Center for Synthetic and Systems Biology, TNLIST, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 111 T.W. Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. ; 1] The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, 415 Main Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. [2] Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit St, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. [3] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 4000 Jones Bridge Road, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815-6789, USA. ; 1] Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. [2] Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Centre for High-Throughput Biology, University of British Columbia, 2125 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25693563" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Base Sequence ; Cell Lineage/genetics ; Cells, Cultured ; Chromatin/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Chromosomes, Human/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; DNA/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; DNA Methylation ; Datasets as Topic ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic/genetics ; Epigenesis, Genetic/*genetics ; *Epigenomics ; Genetic Variation/genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Histones/metabolism ; Humans ; Organ Specificity/genetics ; RNA/genetics ; Reference Values
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-11-26
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Schultz, Matthew D -- He, Yupeng -- Whitaker, John W -- Hariharan, Manoj -- Mukamel, Eran A -- Leung, Danny -- Rajagopal, Nisha -- Nery, Joseph R -- Urich, Mark A -- Chen, Huaming -- Lin, Shin -- Lin, Yiing -- Jung, Inkyung -- Schmitt, Anthony D -- Selvaraj, Siddarth -- Ren, Bing -- Sejnowski, Terrence J -- Wang, Wei -- Ecker, Joseph R -- England -- Nature. 2016 Feb 11;530(7589):242. doi: 10.1038/nature16179. Epub 2015 Nov 25.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26605523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Extremophiles 1 (1997), S. 183-192 
    ISSN: 1433-4909
    Keywords: Key words Archaea ; Hyperthermophile ; Pyrococcus Sulfolobus ; Shuttle vector ; Alcohol dehydrogenase
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Progress in understanding the basic molecular, biochemical, and physiological characteristics of archaeal hyperthermophiles has been limited by the lack of suitable expression vectors. Here, we report the construction of versatile shuttle vectors that can be maintained, and selected for, in both archaea and bacteria. The primary construct, pAG1, was produced by ligating portions of the archaeal cryptic plasmid pGT5 and the bacterial plasmid pUC19, both of which exhibit high copy numbers. A second vector construct, pAG2, was generated, with a reduced copy number in Escherichia coli, by introducing the Rom/Rop gene from pBR322 into pAG1. After transformation, both pAG1 and pAG2 were stably maintained and propagated in the euryarchaeote Pyrococcus furiosus, the crenarchaeote Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, and in Escherichia coli. An archaeal selective marker, the alcohol dehydrogenase gene from Sulfolobus solfataricus, was isolated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and cloned into the two constructs. They were stably maintained and expressed in the two archaea and conferred resistance to butanol and benzyl alcohol. However, the vector pAG21, deriving from pAG2, proved the more stable in E. coli probably due to its lower copy number in the bacterium. Conditions are presented for the use of the vectors which, potentially, can be used for other hyperthermophilic archaea.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 204 (1964), S. 1250-1252 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] RECENT investigations of the sociology of science have suggested a major shift in the organization of science and scientists. The general suggestion is that although science previously was a closed system1, now it is not so. Science is now a part of society and, as such, is subjected to the same ...
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  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 203 (1964), S. 582-584 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] THE post-war period saw a rapid growth of scientific research in India. The Council of Scientific and Industrial Research which was set up in the early 'forties set up a chain of thirty-one laboratories during the period 194663. These laboratories were committed to the task of solving industrial ...
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1574-6976
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract: Although there are currently no cloning and expression vectors available for archaeal hyperthermophiles, small cryptic plasmids have been characterized for these organisms as well as viruses and introns capable of spreading between cells. Below, we review the recent progress in adapting these genetic elements as vectors for Pyrococcus furiosus and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. An efficient and reliable transformation procedure is described for both organisms. The potential of the mobile intron from Desulfurococcus mobilis, inserted into the bacterial vector pUC18 to generate a new type of vector, was investigated in S. acidocaldarius. A polylinker was inserted upstream from the open reading frame encoding the homing enzyme I-DmoI. Both the polylinker and a 276 bp fragment of the tetracycline gene from pBR322 could be inserted into the intron-plasmid construct and spreading still occurred in the culture of S. acidocaldarius. Experiments are in progress to test the co-mobility of the alcohol dehydrogenase and β-galactosidase genes from Sulfolobus species with the intron. A shuttle vector pCSV1 was also produced by fusing the pGT5 plasmid from Pyrococcus abyssi and the bacterial vector pUC19 which, on transformation, is stable in both organisms without selection. Growth inhibition studies indicate that both P. furiosus and S. acidocaldarius are sensitive to the antibiotics carbomycin, celesticetin, chloramphenicol and thiostrepton as well as butanol and butylic alcohol. Spontaneous mutants resistant to these drugs have been isolated carrying single site mutations in their 23S rRNA gene; they include mutants of S. acidocaldarius resistant to chloramphenicol, carbomycin and celesticetin with the mutation C2452U and thiostrepton-resistant mutants of P. furiosus carrying the mutation A1067G (both numbers corresponding to Escherichia coli 23S rRNA). These mutated genes are being developed as selective markers. Moreover, two β-galactosidase genes from P. furiosus have been cloned as possible phenotypic markers; one of these exhibits maximum activity at 95°C with O-nitrophenyl β-d-galactopyranoside as substrate.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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