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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-04-04
    Description: Cancers have dysfunctional redox regulation resulting in reactive oxygen species production, damaging both DNA and free dNTPs. The MTH1 protein sanitizes oxidized dNTP pools to prevent incorporation of damaged bases during DNA replication. Although MTH1 is non-essential in normal cells, we show that cancer cells require MTH1 activity to avoid incorporation of oxidized dNTPs, resulting in DNA damage and cell death. We validate MTH1 as an anticancer target in vivo and describe small molecules TH287 and TH588 as first-in-class nudix hydrolase family inhibitors that potently and selectively engage and inhibit the MTH1 protein in cells. Protein co-crystal structures demonstrate that the inhibitors bind in the active site of MTH1. The inhibitors cause incorporation of oxidized dNTPs in cancer cells, leading to DNA damage, cytotoxicity and therapeutic responses in patient-derived mouse xenografts. This study exemplifies the non-oncogene addiction concept for anticancer treatment and validates MTH1 as being cancer phenotypic lethal.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Gad, Helge -- Koolmeister, Tobias -- Jemth, Ann-Sofie -- Eshtad, Saeed -- Jacques, Sylvain A -- Strom, Cecilia E -- Svensson, Linda M -- Schultz, Niklas -- Lundback, Thomas -- Einarsdottir, Berglind Osk -- Saleh, Aljona -- Gokturk, Camilla -- Baranczewski, Pawel -- Svensson, Richard -- Berntsson, Ronnie P-A -- Gustafsson, Robert -- Stromberg, Kia -- Sanjiv, Kumar -- Jacques-Cordonnier, Marie-Caroline -- Desroses, Matthieu -- Gustavsson, Anna-Lena -- Olofsson, Roger -- Johansson, Fredrik -- Homan, Evert J -- Loseva, Olga -- Brautigam, Lars -- Johansson, Lars -- Hoglund, Andreas -- Hagenkort, Anna -- Pham, Therese -- Altun, Mikael -- Gaugaz, Fabienne Z -- Vikingsson, Svante -- Evers, Bastiaan -- Henriksson, Martin -- Vallin, Karl S A -- Wallner, Olov A -- Hammarstrom, Lars G J -- Wiita, Elisee -- Almlof, Ingrid -- Kalderen, Christina -- Axelsson, Hanna -- Djureinovic, Tatjana -- Puigvert, Jordi Carreras -- Haggblad, Maria -- Jeppsson, Fredrik -- Martens, Ulf -- Lundin, Cecilia -- Lundgren, Bo -- Granelli, Ingrid -- Jensen, Annika Jenmalm -- Artursson, Per -- Nilsson, Jonas A -- Stenmark, Pal -- Scobie, Martin -- Berglund, Ulrika Warpman -- Helleday, Thomas -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 10;508(7495):215-21. doi: 10.1038/nature13181. Epub 2014 Apr 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden [2]. ; Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. ; Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden. ; 1] Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden [2] Chemical Biology Consortium Sweden, Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden. ; Sahlgrenska Translational Melanoma Group, Sahlgrenska Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, University of Gothenburg and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, S-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden. ; Department of Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. ; 1] Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden [2] Uppsala University Drug Optimization and Pharmaceutical Profiling Platform, Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, S-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden. ; 1] Chemical Biology Consortium Sweden, Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden [2] Uppsala University Drug Optimization and Pharmaceutical Profiling Platform, Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, S-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden. ; Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. ; 1] Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden [2] Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linkoping University, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden. ; 1] Science for Life Laboratory, Division of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, S-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden [2] Division of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1006 Amsterdam, The Netherlands (B.E.); Department of Immunology, Genetics, and Pathology, Uppsala University, S-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden (T.D.). ; 1] Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden [2] Division of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, 1006 Amsterdam, The Netherlands (B.E.); Department of Immunology, Genetics, and Pathology, Uppsala University, S-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden (T.D.). ; Science for Life Laboratory, RNAi Cell Screening Facility, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24695224" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Catalytic Domain ; Cell Death/drug effects ; Cell Survival/drug effects ; Crystallization ; DNA Damage ; DNA Repair Enzymes/*antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/metabolism ; Deoxyguanine Nucleotides/metabolism ; Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry/pharmacokinetics/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Female ; Humans ; Male ; Mice ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Conformation ; Molecular Targeted Therapy ; Neoplasms/*drug therapy/*metabolism/pathology ; Nucleotides/*metabolism ; Oxidation-Reduction/drug effects ; Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases/*antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/metabolism ; Pyrimidines/chemistry/pharmacokinetics/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Pyrophosphatases/antagonists & inhibitors ; Reproducibility of Results ; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-05-03
    Description: We performed an integrated genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic characterization of 373 endometrial carcinomas using array- and sequencing-based technologies. Uterine serous tumours and approximately 25% of high-grade endometrioid tumours had extensive copy number alterations, few DNA methylation changes, low oestrogen receptor/progesterone receptor levels, and frequent TP53 mutations. Most endometrioid tumours had few copy number alterations or TP53 mutations, but frequent mutations in PTEN, CTNNB1, PIK3CA, ARID1A and KRAS and novel mutations in the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex gene ARID5B. A subset of endometrioid tumours that we identified had a markedly increased transversion mutation frequency and newly identified hotspot mutations in POLE. Our results classified endometrial cancers into four categories: POLE ultramutated, microsatellite instability hypermutated, copy-number low, and copy-number high. Uterine serous carcinomas share genomic features with ovarian serous and basal-like breast carcinomas. We demonstrated that the genomic features of endometrial carcinomas permit a reclassification that may affect post-surgical adjuvant treatment for women with aggressive tumours.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3704730/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3704730/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network -- Kandoth, Cyriac -- Schultz, Nikolaus -- Cherniack, Andrew D -- Akbani, Rehan -- Liu, Yuexin -- Shen, Hui -- Robertson, A Gordon -- Pashtan, Itai -- Shen, Ronglai -- Benz, Christopher C -- Yau, Christina -- Laird, Peter W -- Ding, Li -- Zhang, Wei -- Mills, Gordon B -- Kucherlapati, Raju -- Mardis, Elaine R -- Levine, Douglas A -- 5U24CA143799-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5U24CA143835-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5U24CA143840-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5U24CA143843-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5U24CA143845-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5U24CA143848-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5U24CA143858-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5U24CA143866-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5U24CA143867-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5U24CA143882-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5U24CA143883-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 5U24CA144025-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA008748/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016086/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA098258/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143799/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143835/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143840/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143843/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143845/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143848/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143858/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143867/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143882/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA143883/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U24 CA144025/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003067/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003079/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54HG003067-11/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54HG003079-10/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54HG003273-10/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 May 2;497(7447):67-73. doi: 10.1038/nature12113.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23636398" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Breast Neoplasms/genetics ; Chromosome Aberrations ; DNA Copy Number Variations/genetics ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; DNA Polymerase II/genetics ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; Endometrial Neoplasms/*classification/*genetics ; Exome/genetics ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genomics ; Humans ; Ovarian Neoplasms/genetics ; Signal Transduction ; Transcription Factors/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-03-17
    Description: Mutations disabling the TP53 tumour suppressor gene represent the most frequent events in human cancer and typically occur through a two-hit mechanism involving a missense mutation in one allele and a 'loss of heterozygosity' deletion encompassing the other. While TP53 missense mutations can also contribute gain-of-function activities that impact tumour progression, it remains unclear whether the deletion event, which frequently includes many genes, impacts tumorigenesis beyond TP53 loss alone. Here we show that somatic heterozygous deletion of mouse chromosome 11B3, a 4-megabase region syntenic to human 17p13.1, produces a greater effect on lymphoma and leukaemia development than Trp53 deletion. Mechanistically, the effect of 11B3 loss on tumorigenesis involves co-deleted genes such as Eif5a and Alox15b (also known as Alox8), the suppression of which cooperates with Trp53 loss to produce more aggressive disease. Our results imply that the selective advantage produced by human chromosome 17p deletion reflects the combined impact of TP53 loss and the reduced dosage of linked tumour suppressor genes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4836395/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4836395/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Liu, Yu -- Chen, Chong -- Xu, Zhengmin -- Scuoppo, Claudio -- Rillahan, Cory D -- Gao, Jianjiong -- Spitzer, Barbara -- Bosbach, Benedikt -- Kastenhuber, Edward R -- Baslan, Timour -- Ackermann, Sarah -- Cheng, Lihua -- Wang, Qingguo -- Niu, Ting -- Schultz, Nikolaus -- Levine, Ross L -- Mills, Alea A -- Lowe, Scott W -- P30 CA008748/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016042/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA190261/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 24;531(7595):471-5. doi: 10.1038/nature17157. Epub 2016 Mar 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Hematology and Department of Liver Surgery, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University and National Collaborative Innovation Center, Chengdu 610041, China. ; Department of Cancer Biology and Genetics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Institute for Cancer Genetics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Human Oncology &Pathogenesis Program and Leukemia Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Hematology &Research Laboratory of Hematology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China. ; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, New York, New York 10065, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26982726" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Animals ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17/genetics ; Chromosomes, Mammalian/genetics ; Disease Models, Animal ; Disease Progression ; Female ; Genes, p53/*genetics ; Heterozygote ; Humans ; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/genetics/pathology ; Lymphoma/genetics/pathology ; Male ; Mice ; Neoplasms/*genetics/*pathology ; Peptide Initiation Factors/genetics/metabolism ; RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Sequence Deletion/*genetics ; Synteny/genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/*deficiency
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    ISSN: 0021-9673
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1520-5126
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    ISSN: 0044-2313
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Inorganic Chemistry
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Description / Table of Contents: Reduction of the oxide halides of Nd, Sm, and Yb with LiH at temperatures between 500 and 800°C gave neither the rare earth monoxides reported in the literature, nor intermediate oxides with the metallic element in mixed valency states. Depending upon the experimental conditions, the reduction process yielded either a mixture of rare earth metal and sesquioxide or the rare earth hydride and sesquioxide. Furthermore, SmO and YbO could not be obtained by careful oxidation of the respective metals; efforts to stabilize these monoxides in a matrix of SrO and CaO were also unsuccessful.
    Notes: Durch Reduktion geeigneter Oxidhalogenide von Nd, Sm, und Yb mit LiH bei 500 bis 800°C gelang weder die Darstellung der in der Literatur erwähnten Seltenerdmonoxide NdO, SmO und YbO, noch ließen sich Oxide mit gemischter Oxydationsstufe erhalten. Die Versuche führten in Abhängigkeit von den Reaktionsbedingungen entweder zu einem Gemisch aus Seltenerdmetall und -sesquioxid oder aus Seltenerdhydrid und -sesquioxid. SmO und YbO konnten auch nicht beim vorsichtigen Oxydieren der betreffenden Metalle gefaßt werden. Ebenso erfolglos blieben Bemühungen zur Stabilisierung dieser Oxide durch Einbau in SrO und CaO.
    Additional Material: 1 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 0044-2313
    Keywords: Chemistry ; Inorganic Chemistry
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Description / Table of Contents: Various methods for the preparation of SmOBr, EuOBr, YbOBr, Sm3O4Br, Eu3O4Br and Yb3O4Br are described. According to X-ray diffraction powder photographs of the new compounds, the oxide bromides LnOBr belong to the PbFCl type like nearly all of the other known rare earth oxide halides, whereas the orthorhombic compounds Ln3O4Br have their own structure type which is not yet known. In a review of the rare earth oxide halides of the PbFCl type it is shown, that beside characteristic common structural features, remarkable crystal chemical differences appear depending on the size of the halide or rare earth ions, respectively.
    Notes: Es werden verschiedene Methoden zur Darstellung von SmOBr, EuOBr, YbOBr, Sm3O4Br, Eu3O4Br und Yb3O4Br beschrieben. Nach röntgenographischen Untersuchungen der neuen Verbindungen mit Hilfe von Pulveraufnahmen gehören die Oxidbromide LnOBr wie fast alle bekannten Seltenerdoxidhalogenide dem PbFCl-Typ an, während die rhombisch kristallisierenden Verbindungen Ln3O4Br einen eigenen, noch nicht aufgeklärten Strukturtyp besitzen. In einer vergleichenden Betrachtung der Seltenerdoxidhalogenide des PbFCl-Typs wird gezeigt, daß neben charakteristischen gemeinsamen Strukturmerkmalen bemerkenswerte kristallchemische Unterschiede in Abhängigkeit von der Größe der Halogen- bzw. Seltenerd-Ionen auftreten.
    Additional Material: 2 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-12-15
    Description: Purpose: Lauren diffuse-type gastric adenocarcinomas (DGAs) are generally genomically stable. We identified lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2C ( KMT2C ) as a frequently mutated gene and examined its role in DGA progression. Experimental Design: We performed whole exome sequencing on tumor samples of 27 patients with DGA who underwent gastrectomy. Lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2C ( KMT2C ) was analyzed in DGA cell lines and in patient tumors. Results: KMT2C was the most frequently mutated gene (11 of 27 tumors [41%]). KMT2C expression by immunohistochemistry in tumors from 135 patients with DGA undergoing gastrectomy inversely correlated with more advanced tumor stage ( P = 0.023) and worse overall survival ( P = 0.017). KMT2C shRNA knockdown in non-transformed HFE-145 gastric epithelial cells promoted epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as demonstrated by increased expression of EMT-related proteins N-cadherin and Slug. Migration and invasion in gastric epithelial cells following KMT2C knockdown increased by 47- to 88-fold. In the DGA cell lines MKN-45 and SNU-668, which have lost KMT2C expression, KMT2C re-expression decreased expression of EMT-related proteins, reduced cell migration by 52% to 60%, and reduced cell invasion by 50% to 74%. Flank xenografts derived from KMT2C-expressing DGA organoids, compared with wild-type organoids, grew more slowly and lost their infiltrative leading edge. EMT can lead to the acquisition of cancer stem cell (CSC) phenotypes. KMT2C re-expression in DGA cell lines reduced spheroid formation by 77% to 78% and reversed CSC resistance to chemotherapy via promotion of DNA damage and apoptosis. Conclusions: KMT2C is frequently mutated in certain populations with DGA. KMT2C loss in DGA promotes EMT and is associated with worse overall survival.
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-09-05
    Description: Purpose: Various genetic driver aberrations have been identified among distinct anatomic and clinical subtypes of intrahepatic and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, and these molecular alterations may be prognostic biomarkers and/or predictive of drug response. Experimental Design: Tumor samples from patients with cholangiocarcinoma who consented prospectively were analyzed using the MSK-IMPACT platform, a targeted next-generation sequencing assay that analyzes all exons and selected introns of 410 cancer-associated genes. Fisher exact tests were performed to identify associations between clinical characteristics and genetic alterations. Results: A total of 195 patients were studied: 78% intrahepatic and 22% extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. The most commonly altered genes in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma were IDH1 (30%), ARID1A (23%), BAP1 (20%), TP53 (20%), and FGFR2 gene fusions (14%). A tendency toward mutual exclusivity was seen between multiple genes in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma including TP53:IDH1, IDH1:KRAS, TP53:BAP1 , and IDH1:FGFR2 . Alterations in CDKN2A/B and ERBB2 were associated with reduced survival and time to progression on chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Genetic alterations with potential therapeutic implications were identified in 47% of patients, leading to biomarker-directed therapy or clinical trial enrollment in 16% of patients. Conclusions: Cholangiocarcinoma is a genetically diverse cancer. Alterations in CDKN2A/B and ERBB2 are associated with negative prognostic implications in patients with advanced disease. Somatic alterations with therapeutic implications were identified in almost half of patients. These prospective data provide a contemporary benchmark for guiding the development of targeted therapies in molecularly profiled cholangiocarcinoma, and support to the use of molecular profiling to guide therapy selection in patients with advanced biliary cancers. Clin Cancer Res; 24(17); 4154–61. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
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