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  • 1
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  Mainz//2011; 56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie (gmds), 6. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Epidemiologie (DGEpi); 20110926-20110929; Mainz; DOC11gmds345 /20110920/
    Publication Date: 2011-09-20
    Keywords: ALS Register Schwaben ; Design ; erste Ergebnisse ; ddc: 610
    Language: German
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 2
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  Kongress Medizin und Gesellschaft 2007; 20070917-20070921; Augsburg; DOC07gmds287 /20070906/
    Publication Date: 2007-09-07
    Keywords: adipokines ; asthma ; allergy ; children ; ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 3
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    German Medical Science; Düsseldorf, Köln
    In:  27. Deutscher Krebskongress; 20060322-20060326; Berlin; DOCIS077 /20060320/
    Publication Date: 2006-04-21
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 4
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  Mainz//2011; 56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie (gmds), 6. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Epidemiologie (DGEpi); 20110926-20110929; Mainz; DOC11gmds311 /20110920/
    Publication Date: 2011-09-20
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 5
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; carcinoma ; MODEL ; THERAPY ; DIAGNOSIS ; FOLLOW-UP ; PATIENT ; IMPACT ; treatment ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; PATTERNS ; CARE ; AGE ; WOMEN ; adjuvant systemic therapy ; COMORBIDITY ; GUIDELINES ; OLDER WOMEN ; REGRESSION-MODELS ; treatment recommendations
    Abstract: Purpose: To assess adherence to treatment recommendations regarding adjuvant systemic therapy of postmenopausal patients with early stage breast cancer. Methods: A population-based cohort of women from Eastern Thuringia/Germany with first diagnosis of breast cancer in 1995-2000 was studied. The use of adjuvant therapy was assessed separately for patients with positive and negative nodal status fitting polytomous logistic regression models. Results: Among 396 women with positive lymph nodes and 832 with negative lymph nodes, 92.9% and 87.3% received an adjuvant systemic treatment, respectively. Age, comorbidity, hormone receptor status. histological grading, and additionally, in nodal positives, the number of involved lymph nodes, were associated with treatment patterns. Age had the strongest impact on treatment decision. Older women more often received hormone- or no adjuvant therapy. However, 26.3% of the women with lymph node involvement and positive hormone receptor status received no hormone therapy, whereas 35.7% of women with negative hormone receptor status received hormone therapy. Conclusion: The number of patients with adjuvant systemic therapy is high in women with positive and those with negative lymph nodes, reflecting adherence to the recommendations. Better outcome could be expected if hormone therapy was used adequately in receptor positives. Further follow-up is required to monitor the outcome and changes in adherence to treatment recommendations
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12709795
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; FOLLOW-UP ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; RISK ; MECHANISM ; mechanisms ; ASSOCIATION ; FREQUENCY ; ACID ; ACIDS ; WOMEN ; fatty acids ; FATTY-ACIDS ; DIETARY ; PREVALENCE ; OXIDATIVE STRESS ; ANTIOXIDANT ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; questionnaires ; SMOKERS ; antioxidants ; FOOD ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; WEST-GERMANY ; asthma ; antioxidants,diet,EPIC,fatty acids,hay fever ; ATOPY ; BETA-CAROTENE ; EAST-GERMANY ; EPIC-GERMANY ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; NUTRIENTS ; VITAMIN-E
    Abstract: Background: The objective of the investigation was to explore in a prospective study the associations between dietary intake of fatty acids, antioxidants and hay fever manifestation in adulthood.Methods: Three hundred and thirty-four hay fever cases with adult onset of clinical symptoms from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Heidelberg cohort were identified during follow-up and matched with 1336 controls. Dietary intake data were obtained by means of validated food frequency questionnaires. The influence of dietary fatty acid and vitamin intake on hay fever risk was estimated by means of unconditional logistic regression.Results: High intake of oleic acid was positively associated with hay fever [odds ratio (OR): 2.86, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI): 1.22-6.70], whereas high intake of eicosapentaenoic acid was inversely related to hay fever (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22-0.93). Furthermore, high beta-carotene intake increased the risk of hay fever (OR: 1.69, 95% CI: 1.09-2.63) while increasing intake of vitamin E was a protective factor (OR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.17-0.85). In grouped analyses, the effects of beta-carotene and vitamin E were mainly observed among women and ex-/current-smokers; in these subgroups, linoleic acid increased the risk of hay fever.Conclusions: In conclusion, the present results provide further evidence that dietary factors might affect the risk of clinical manifestation of hay fever. However, the effects in smokers and women may suggest different biological mechanisms for the investigated nutrients, which need further research
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14616103
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  • 7
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; TRIAL ; hormone ; HEALTH ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; OBESITY ; risk factors ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; RISK FACTOR ; EPIC ; EPIC study ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MASS INDEX ; PH ; WEIGHT ; body weight ; fat distribution ; HEIGHT ; ADIPOSITY ; breast neoplasm ; HORMONE-REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; METAANALYSIS
    Abstract: The evidence for anthropometric factors influencing breast cancer risk is accumulating, but uncertainties remain concerning the role of fat distribution and potential effect modifiers. We used data from 73,542 premenopausal and 103,344 postmenopausal women from 9 European countries, taking part in the EPIC study. RRs from Cox regression models were calculated, using measured height, weight, BMI and waist and hip circumferences; categorized by cohort wide quintiles; and expressed as continuous variables, adjusted for study center, age and other risk factors. During 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,879 incident invasive breast cancers were identified. In postmenopausal women, current HRT modified the body size-breast cancer association. Among nonusers, weight, BMI and hip circumference were positively associated with breast cancer risk (all P-trend less than or equal to 0.002); obese women (BMI 〉 30) had a 31% excess risk compared to women with BMI 〈 25. Among HRT users, body measures were inversely but nonsignificantly associated with breast cancer. Excess breast cancer risk with HRT was particularly evident among lean women. Pooled RRs per height increment of 5 cm were 1.05 (95% CI 1.00-1.16) in premenopausal and 1.10 (95% CI 1.05-1.16) in postmenopausal women. Among premenopausal women, hip circumference was the only other measure significantly related to breast cancer (P-trend = 0.03), after accounting for BMI. In postmenopausal women not taking exogenous hormones, general obesity is a significant predictor of breast cancer, while abdominal fat assessed as waist-hip ratio or waist circumference was not related to excess risk when adjusted for BMI. Among premenopausal women, weight and BMI showed nonsignificant inverse associations with breast cancer. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15252848
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; RISK ; RISKS ; PATIENT ; RISK-FACTORS ; BINDING ; CYCLE ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; EPIC ; nutrition ; ESTRADIOL ; SERUM ; SINGLE ; DEFICIENCY ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; MAMMARY-GLAND ; ESTROGEN ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; TESTS ; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM-LEVELS ; ADRENAL ANDROGENS ; ESTROGEN PLUS PROGESTIN ; FEMALE NOBLE RATS ; HEALTHY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; HORMONE LEVELS ; ONE-YEAR PERIOD ; REPLACEMENT THERAPY
    Abstract: Background. Contrasting etiologic hypotheses about the role of endogenous sex steroids in breast cancer development among premenopausal women implicate ovarian androgen excess and progesterone deficiency, estrogen excess, estrogen and progesterone excess, and both an excess or lack of adrenal androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA] or its sulfate [DHEAS]) as risk factors. We conducted a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort to examine associations among premenopausal serum concentrations of sex steroids and subsequent breast cancer risk. Methods: Levels of DHEAS, (Delta 4-)androstenedione, testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured in single prediagnostic serum samples from 370 premenopausal women who subsequently developed breast cancer (case patients) and from 726 matched cancer-free control subjects. Levels of progesterone, estrone, and estradiol were also measured for the 285 case patients and 555 matched control subjects who had provided information about the day of menstrual cycle at blood donation. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate relative risks of breast cancer by quartiles of hormone concentrations. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Increased risks of breast cancer were associated with elevated serum concentrations of testosterone (odds ratio [OR] for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.16 to 2.57; P-trend =.01), androstenedione (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.569 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.32; P-trend =.01), and DHEAS (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.02 to 2.14; P-trend =.10) but not SHBG. Elevated serum progesterone concentrations were associated with a statistically significant reduction in breast cancer risk (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.38 to 0.98; P-trend =.06). The absolute risk of breast cancer for women younger than 40 followed up for 10 years was estimated at 2.6% for those in the highest quartile of serum testosterone versus 1.5% for those in the lowest quartile; for the highest and lowest quartiles of progesterone, these estimates were 1.7% and 2.6%, respectively. Breast cancer risk was not statistically significantly associated with serum levels
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15900045
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; NITRIC-OXIDE ; INFECTION ; ASSOCIATION ; antibodies ; antibody ; PLASMA ; NUMBER ; cancer risk ; DIETARY ; INDIVIDUALS ; CARDIA ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; INCREASE ; IRON ; LEVEL ; prospective ; MEAT INTAKE ; RED MEAT ; CANCER-RISK ; Helicobacter pylori ; N-NITROSO COMPOUNDS ; HEME ; processed meat
    Abstract: The risk of gastric cancer (GC) associated with dietary intake of nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and endogenous formation of nitroso compounds (NOCs) was investigated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The study included 521 457 individuals and 314 incident cases of GC that had occurred after 6.6 average years of follow-up. An index of endogenous NOC (ENOC) formation was estimated using data of the iron content from meat intake and faecal apparent total NOC formation according to previous published studies. Antibodies to Helicobacter pylori and vitamin C levels were measured in a sub-sample of cases and matched controls included in a nested case-control within the cohort. Exposure to NDMA was 〈 1 mu g on average compared with 93 mu g on average from ENOC. There was no association between NDMA intake and GC risk (HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.7-1.43). ENOC was significantly associated with non-cardia cancer risk (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.14-1.78 for an increase of 40 mu g/day) but not with cardia cancer (HR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.69-1.33). Although the number of not infected cases is low, our data suggest a possible interaction between ENOC and H.pylori infection (P for interaction = 0.09). Moreover, we observed an interaction between plasma vitamin C and ENOC (P 〈 0.02). ENOC formation may account for our previously reported association between red and processed meat consumption and gastric cancer risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16571648
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; IMMUNOASSAYS ; immunoassay ; LIFE-STYLE FACTORS ; dehydroepiandrosterone ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; EPIC PROJECT ; LEVEL ; methods ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM-LEVELS ; alcohol consumption ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; prospective ; BINDING GLOBULIN ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; intake ; steroids ; HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS ; alcohol intake ; ESTRADIOL LEVELS ; post-menopausal women ; pre-menopausal ; SERUM HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS ; sex steroids
    Abstract: Objective Women with a moderate intake of alcohol have higher concentrations of sex steroids in serum, and higher risk of developing breast cancer, compared to non-drinkers. In the present study, we investigate the relationships between alcohol consumption and serum levels of sex steroids and sex-hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in 790 pre- and 1,291 post-menopausal women, who were part of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods Serum levels of testosterone (T), androstenedione (Delta(4)), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), estrone (E-1), estradiol (E-2) and SHBG were measured by direct immunoassays. Free T (fT) and free E-2 (fE(2)) were calculated according to mass action laws. Current alcohol intake exposure to alcohol was assessed from dietary questionnaires. Results Pre-menopausal women who consumed more than 25 g/day of alcohol had about 30% higher DHEAS, T and fT, 20% higher Delta(4) and about 40% higher E-1, concentrations compared to women who were non-consumers. E-2, fE(2) and SHBG concentrations showed no association with current alcohol intake. In post-menopausal women, DHEAS, fT, T, Delta(4), and E-1 concentrations were between 10% and 20% higher in women who consumed more than 25 g/day of alcohol compared to non-consumers. E-2 or fE(2) were not associated with alcohol intake at all. SHBG levels were about 15% lower in alcohol consumers compared to non-consumers. Conclusion This study supports the hypothesis of an influence of alcohol intake on sex hormone concentrations in blood
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16933054
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