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  • 1
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; POPULATION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; hormone ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FISH ; FIBER ; COLON-CANCER ; DOSE-RESPONSE ; Jun ; DIET ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; EPIC CALIBRATION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; INTERVAL ; TESTS ; alcohol consumption ; MEAT INTAKE ; DIETARY CARCINOGENS ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; N-NITROSATION ; RED MEAT
    Abstract: Background. Current evidence suggests that high red meat intake is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. High fish intake may be associated with a decreased risk, but the existing evidence is less convincing. Methods: We prospectively followed 478040 men and women from 10 European countries who were free of cancer at enrollment between 1992 and 1998. Information on diet and lifestyle was collected at baseline. After a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 1329 incident colorectal cancers were documented. We examined the relationship between intakes of red and processed meat, poultry, and fish and colorectal cancer risk using a proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex, energy (nonfat and fat sources), height, weight, work-related physical activity, smoking status, dietary fiber and folate, and alcohol consumption, stratified by center. A calibration substudy based on 36994 subjects was used to correct hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for diet measurement errors. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Colorectal cancer risk was positively associated with intake of red and processed meat (highest [〉 160 g/day] versus lowest [〈 20 g/day] intake, HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.96 to 1.88; P-trend = .03) and inversely associated with intake of fish (〉 80 g/day versus 〈 10 g/day, HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.88; P-trend 〈 .001), but was not related to poultry intake. Correcting for measurement error strengthened the associations between colorectal cancer and red and processed meat intake (per 100-g increase HR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.41, P-trend = .001 and HR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.02, P-trend = .001 before and after calibration, respectively) and for fish (per 100 g increase HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.57 to 0.87, P-trend 〈 .001 and HR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.77, P-trend = .003; before and after correction, respectively). In this study population, the absolute risk of development of colorectal cancer within 10 years for a study subject aged 50 years was 1.71% for the highest category of red and processed meat intake and 1.28% for the lowest category of intake and was 1.86% for subjects in the lowest category of fish intake and 1.28% for subjects in the highest category of fish intake. Conclusions: Our data confirm that colorectal cancer risk is positively associated with high consumption of red and processed meat and support an inverse association with fish intake
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15956652
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  • 2
    Keywords: LUNG-CANCER ; SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCUS ; NECK-CANCER ; pooled analysis ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; ALCOHOL-DRINKING ; EPIDEMIOLOGY CONSORTIUM ; INTERNATIONAL HEAD ; SENSITIVITY PROTEIN MUS308 ; TOBACCO-RELATED CANCERS
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to etiologically complex disease. We conducted a GWAS to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers. Genome-wide genotyping was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips in 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls. The 19 top-ranked variants were investigated further in an additional 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies participating in the INHANCE consortium. Five common variants presented evidence for significant association in the combined analysis (p 〈= 5 x 10(-7)). Two novel variants were identified, a 4q21 variant (rs1494961, p = 1 x 10(-8)) located near DNA repair related genes HEL308 and FAM175A (or Abraxas) and a 12q24 variant (rs4767364, p = 2 x 10(-8)) located in an extended linkage disequilibrium region that contains multiple genes including the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene. Three remaining variants are located in the ADH gene cluster and were identified previously in a candidate gene study involving some of these samples. The association between these three variants and UADT cancers was independently replicated in 5,092 UADT cancer cases and 6,794 controls non-overlapping samples presented here (rs1573496-ADH7, p = 5 x 10(-8); rs1229984-ADH1B, p = 7 x 10(-9); and rs698-ADH1C, p = 0.02). These results implicate two variants at 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants in UADT cancer susceptibility
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21437268
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  • 3
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Although smoking and HPV infection are recognized as important risk factors for oropharyngeal cancer, how their joint exposure impacts on oropharyngeal cancer risk is unclear. Specifically, whether smoking confers any additional risk to HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer is not understood. METHODS: Using HPV serology as a marker of HPV-related cancer, we examined the interaction between smoking and HPV16 in 459 oropharyngeal (and 1445 oral cavity and laryngeal) cancer patients and 3024 control participants from two large European multi-centre studies. Odds ratios and credible intervals [CrI], adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated using Bayesian logistic regression. RESULTS: Both smoking [odds ratio (OR [CrI]: 6.82 [4.52, 10.29]) and HPV seropositivity (OR [CrI]: 235.69 [99.95, 555.74]) were independently associated with oropharyngeal cancer. The joint association of smoking and HPV seropositivity was consistent with that expected on the additive scale (synergy index [CrI]: 1.32 [0.51, 3.45]), suggesting they act as independent risk factors for oropharyngeal cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking was consistently associated with increase in oropharyngeal cancer risk in models stratified by HPV16 seropositivity. In addition, we report that the prevalence of oropharyngeal cancer increases with smoking for both HPV16-positive and HPV16-negative persons. The impact of smoking on HPV16-positive oropharyngeal cancer highlights the continued need for smoking cessation programmes for primary prevention of head and neck cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27197530
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; Germany ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; MORTALITY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; HEART ; REDUCTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; HEALTH ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; risk factors ; Jun ; RECRUITMENT ; DIET ; DIETARY ; NETHERLANDS ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; LIFE-STYLE ; HEART-DISEASE ; Mediterranean diet ; REGRESSION ; PATTERN ; INCREASE ; overall survival ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; INTERVAL ; analysis ; dietary patterns ; elderly ; PRINCIPAL COMPONENTS ; QUALITY INDEX ; ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY ; prospective ; RISK-FACTOR ; VARIABLES ; ENGLAND ; multi-centre cohort study ; BRITISH ADULTS ; coronary heart disease ; FOOD-INTAKE PATTERNS
    Abstract: Objective: To investigate the association of a posteriori dietary patterns with overall survival of older Europeans. Design and setting: This is a multi-centre cohort study. Cox regression analysis was used to investigate the association of the prevailing, a posteriori-derived, plant-based dietary pattern with all-cause mortality in a population of subjects who were 60 years or older at recruitment to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Elderly cohort). Analyses controlled for all known potential risk factors. Subjects: in total, 74 607 men and women, 60 years or older at enrolment and without previous coronary heart disease, stroke or cancer, with complete information about dietary intakes and potentially confounding variables, and with known survival status as of December 2003, were included in the analysis. Results: An increase in the score which measures the adherence to the plant-based diet was associated with a lower overall mortality, a one standard deviation increment corresponding to a statistically significant reduction of 14% (95% confidence interval 5-23%). In country-specific analyses the apparent association was stronger in Greece, Spain, Denmark and The Netherlands, and absent in the UK and Germany. Conclusions: Greater adherence to the plant-based diet that was defined a posteriori in this population of European elders is associated with lower all-cause mortality. This dietary score is moderately positively correlated with the Modified Mediterranean Diet Score that has been constructed a priori and was also shown to be beneficial for the Survival of the same EPIC-Elderly cohort
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17381929
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; SYSTEM ; DISEASE ; RISK ; RISKS ; PROTEIN ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; METABOLISM ; SERA ; INDEX ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; NO ; hormone ; NEOPLASIA ; AGE ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; WOMEN ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; BODY ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; RELATIVE RISK ; REGRESSION-MODELS ; BINDING PROTEIN ; MASS INDEX ; MASSES ; SERUM ; BODIES ; IGF-I ; ONCOLOGY ; BINDING-PROTEIN ; case control study ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; RE ; DETERMINANTS ; HEIGHT ; development ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; analysis ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; IGFBP3 ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; prospective ; odds ratio ; CANCER-RISK ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; OVARIAN ; IGFBP-3 ; SET ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; BODY-MASS ; BODY-MASS-INDEX ; INSULIN-LIKE-GROWTH-FACTOR-1
    Abstract: We set out to study the relationship between circulating levels of IGF-I and its major binding protein (IGFBP-3) in relation to ovarian cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured in prediagnostic serum samples of 214 women who subsequently developed ovarian cancer, and 388 matched control subjects. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate relative risks of ovarian cancer by tertiles of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels. For all women, there was no association between the circulating IGF-I or IGFBP-3 levels and the risk of ovarian cancer. However, among women diagnosed with ovarian cancer aged 55 or younger, the relative risk was higher in the middle or top tertiles of serum IGF-I, when compared with women in the lowest tertile (odds ratios (OR) = 1.8 (95%Cl 0.7-4.3) and OR = 2.4 (95%Cl 0.9-6.4); P-trend = 0.08) respectively. These results were adjusted for body mass index, previous hormone use, fertility problems, and parity. Restricting the analysis to women who were premenopausal at blood donation, relative risks for ovarian cancer diagnosed before age 55 were higher (OR = 5.1 (95%Cl 1.5-18.2) and OR = 5.6 (95%Cl 1.5-20.8) respectively, for second and third tertiles; P-trend = 0.02). Adjustment for serum IGFBP-3 levels only slightly attenuated relative risk estimates. Relations between IGFBP-3 and ovarian cancer before age 55 were in the same direction as for IGF-I, but less strong and statistically not significant. In women aged over 55, there was no association between serum IGF-I or IGFBP-3 and ovarian cancer risk. Our results suggest that the circulating levels of IGF-I may play a potentially important role in the development of ovarian cancer in women of a pre- or perimenopausal age
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17395977
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  • 6
    Abstract: PURPOSE: There is inconsistent evidence regarding the relationship between higher intake of nuts, being an energy-dense food, and weight gain. We investigated the relationship between nut intake and changes in weight over 5 years. METHODS: This study includes 373,293 men and women, 25-70 years old, recruited between 1992 and 2000 from 10 European countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Habitual intake of nuts including peanuts, together defined as nut intake, was estimated from country-specific validated dietary questionnaires. Body weight was measured at recruitment and self-reported 5 years later. The association between nut intake and body weight change was estimated using multilevel mixed linear regression models with center/country as random effect and nut intake and relevant confounders as fixed effects. The relative risk (RR) of becoming overweight or obese after 5 years was investigated using multivariate Poisson regressions stratified according to baseline body mass index (BMI). RESULTS: On average, study participants gained 2.1 kg (SD 5.0 kg) over 5 years. Compared to non-consumers, subjects in the highest quartile of nut intake had less weight gain over 5 years (-0.07 kg; 95% CI -0.12 to -0.02) (P trend = 0.025) and had 5% lower risk of becoming overweight (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.92-0.98) or obese (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.90-0.99) (both P trend 〈0.008). CONCLUSIONS: Higher intake of nuts is associated with reduced weight gain and a lower risk of becoming overweight or obese.
    Type of Publication: Journal article epub ahead of print
    PubMed ID: 28733927
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  • 7
    Keywords: measurement ; CANCER ; Germany ; COHORT ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; PLASMA ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; MALES ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; MARKERS ; SWEDEN ; REGION ; REGIONS ; NETHERLANDS ; ALCOHOL ; GREECE ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; antioxidants ; DENMARK ; BETA-CAROTENE ; VITAMIN-E ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; alpha-carotene ; beta-cryptoxanthin ; carotenoids ; lutein ; LYCOPENE ; MASS INDEX ; MASSES ; PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY ; RETINOL ; SEASONAL-VARIATION ; SERUM CONCENTRATIONS ; zeaxanthin
    Abstract: Background: In addition to their possible direct biological effects, plasma carotenoids can be used as biochemical markers of fruit and vegetable consumption for identifying diet-disease associations in epidemiological studies. Few studies have compared levels of these carotenoids between countries in Europe. Objective: Our aim was to assess the variability of plasma carotenoid levels within the cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods: Plasma levels of six carotenoids-alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin-were measured cross-sectionally in 3043 study subjects from 16 regions in nine European countries. We investigated the relative influence of gender, season, age, body mass index (BMI), alcohol intake and smoking status on plasma levels of the carotenoids. Results: Mean plasma level of the sum of the six carotenoids varied twofold between regions (1.35 mumol l(-1) for men in Malmo, Sweden vs. 2.79 mumol l(-1) for men in Ragusa/Naples, Italy; 1.61 mumol l(-1) for women in The Netherlands vs. 3.52 mumol l(-1) in Ragusa/Naples, Italy). Mean levels of individual carotenoids varied up to fourfold (alpha-carotene: 0.06 mumol l(-1) for men in Murcia, Spain vs. 0.25 mumol l(-1) for vegetarian men living in the UK). In multivariate regression analyses, region was the most important predictor of total plasma carotenoid level (partial R-2=27.3%), followed by BMI (partial R-2=5.2%), gender (partial R-2=2.7%) and smoking status (partial R-2=2.8%). Females had higher total carotenoid levels than males across Europe. Conclusions: Plasma levels of carotenoids vary substantially between 16 different regions in Italy, Greece, Spain, France, Germany, the UK, Sweden, Denmark and The Netherlands. Compared with region of residence, the other demographic and lifestyle factors and laboratory measurements have limited predictive value for plasma carotenoid levels in Europe
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15369608
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG ; EMPHYSEMA ; FOLLOW-UP ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; NETWORKS ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; DNA adducts ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; GENES ; TIME ; DNA ; AIR-POLLUTION ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; AGE ; REPAIR ; smoking ; leukemia ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; cancer risk ; DAMAGE ; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS ; DNA-DAMAGE ; RECRUITMENT ; ADDUCTS ; case-control studies ; EPIC ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; WHITE BLOOD-CELLS ; DNA-ADDUCTS ; case-control study ; DETERMINANTS ; monitoring ; GSTM1 ; LEVEL ; ADDUCT ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; DNA damage ; DNA ADDUCT ; ABILITY ; GENDER ; OUTDOOR AIR-POLLUTION ; OZONE
    Abstract: Objectives were to investigate prospectively the ability of DNA adducts to predict cancer and to study the determinants of adducts, especially air pollutants. DNA adducts were measured in a case-control study nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC investigation. Cases included newly diagnosed lung cancer (n = 115), upper respiratory cancers (pharynx and larynx, n 82), bladder cancer (n = 124), leukemia (n = 166), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or emphysema deaths (n = 77) accrued after a median follow-up of 7 years among the EPIC former smokers and never-smokers. Three controls per case were matched for questionnaire analyses and two controls per case for laboratory analyses. Matching criteria were gender, age, smoking status, country of recruitment, and follow-up time. Individual exposure to air pollution was assessed using concentration data from monitoring stations in routine air quality monitoring networks. Leukocyte DNA adducts were analyzed blindly using (32)p postlabeling technique. Adducts were associated with the subsequent risk of lung cancer, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.86 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.88-3.931 when comparing detectable versus nondetectable adducts. The association with lung cancer was stronger in never-smokers (OR, 4.04; 95% CI, 1.06-15.42) and among the younger age groups. After exclusion of the cancers occurring in the first 36 months of follow-up, the OR was 4.16 (95% CI, 1.24-13.88). A positive association was found between DNA adducts and ozone (O-3) concentration. Our prospective study suggests that leukocyte DNA adducts may predict lung cancer risk of never-smokers. Besides, the association of DNA adduct levels with O-3 indicates a possible role for photochemical smog in determining DNA damage
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16140979
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; RISK ; RISKS ; TUMORS ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; ENERGY ; WOMEN ; etiology ; MEN ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; COLON-CANCER ; DOSE-RESPONSE ; UNITED-STATES ; BODY ; body mass index ; nutrition ; dietary fiber ; LEISURE-TIME ; physical activity ; RECTAL-CANCER ; MASS INDEX ; ASSOCIATIONS ; colon cancer ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; INTERVAL ; PARTICIPANTS ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; ENERGY-BALANCE ; prospective ; BMI ; CANCERS ; CANCER-RISK ; ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE ; ANATOMIC SUBSITE ; intake ; LARGE-BOWEL-CANCER ; OCCUPATIONAL RISK
    Abstract: We investigated several aspects of the role of physical activity in colon and rectal cancer etiology that remain unclear in the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer. This cohort of 413,044 men and women had 1,094 cases of colon and 599 cases of rectal cancer diagnosed during an average of 6.4 years of follow-up. We analyzed baseline data on occupational, household, and recreational activity to examine associations by type of activity, tumor subsite, body mass index (BMI), and energy intake. The multivariate hazard ratio for colon cancer was 0.78 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.59-1.03] among the most active participants when compared with the inactive, with evidence of a dose-response effect (P-trend = 0.04). For right-sided colon tumors, the risk was 0.65 (95% CI, 0.43-1.00) in the highest quartile of activity with evidence of a linear trend (P-trend=0.004). Active participants with a BMI under 25 had a risk of 0.63 (95% CI, 0.39-1.01) for colon cancer compared with the inactive. Finally, an interaction between BMI and activity (P-interaction=0.03) was observed for right-sided colon cancers; among moderately active and active participants with a BMI under 25, a risk of 0.38 (95% CI, 0.21-0.68) was found as compared with inactive participants with BMI 〉 30. No comparable decreased risks were observed for rectal cancer for any type of physical activity for any subgroup analyses or interactions considered. We found that physical activity reduced colon cancer risk, specifically for right-sided tumors and for lean participants, but not rectal cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17164362
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; RISKS ; AGE ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; TOBACCO ; GLUCOSE ; BODY ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; nutrition ; pancreatic cancer ; RELATIVE RISK ; physical activity ; MASS INDEX ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; WAIST ; INTERVAL ; pancreatic ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; PARTICIPANTS ; anthropometry ; prospective ; RISK-FACTOR ; BODY-FAT DISTRIBUTION ; hip ; MALE SMOKERS
    Abstract: Tobacco smoking is the only established risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Results from several epidemiologic studies have suggested that increased body mass index and/or lack of physical activity may be associated with an increased risk of this disease. We examined the relationship between anthropometry and physical activity recorded at baseline and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (n = 438,405 males and females age 19-84 years and followed for a total of 2,826,070 person-years). Relative risks (RR) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and country and adjusted for smoking and self-reported diabetes and, where appropriate, height. In total, there were 324 incident cases of pancreatic cancer diagnosed in the cohort over an average of 6 years of follow-up. There was evidence that the RR of pancreatic cancer was associated with increased height [RR, 1.74; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.20-2.52] for highest quartile compared with lowest quartile (P-trend = 0.001). However, this trend was primarily due to a low risk in the lowest quartile, as when this group was excluded, the trend was no longer statistically significant (P = 0.27). A larger waist-to-hip ratio and waist circumference were both associated with an increased risk of developing the disease (RR per 0.1, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.04-1.48; P-trend = 0.02 and RR per 10 cm, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.01-1.26; P-trend = 0.03, respectively). There was a nonsignificant increased risk of pancreatic cancer with increasing body mass index (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.95-1.24 per 5 kg/m(2)), and a nonsignificant decreased risk with total physical activity (RR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.50-1.35 for most active versus inactive). Future studies should consider including measurements of waist and hip circumference, to further investigate the relationship between central adiposity and the risk of pancreatic cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16702364
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