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  • 1
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  Kongress Medizin und Gesellschaft 2007; 20070917-20070921; Augsburg; DOC07gmds294 /20070906/
    Publication Date: 2007-09-07
    Keywords: Kohorte ; Diabetiker ; Gemüse ; Obst ; Mortalität ; ddc: 610
    Language: German
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; DISEASE ; POPULATION ; validation ; COMPLEX ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; ACID ; PLASMA ; MEN ; CENTERS ; EPIC ; nutrition ; FOOD-INTAKE ; nutrient intake ; SERUM PHOSPHOLIPIDS ; EPIC CALIBRATION ; 24-HOUR DIET RECALL ; prospective ; biological markers ; INVESTIGATE ; PROCESSED FOODS
    Abstract: Background: Plasma phospholipid fatty acids have been correlated with food intakes in populations with homogeneous dietary patterns. However, few data are available on populations with heterogeneous dietary patterns. Objective: The objective was to investigate whether plasma phospholipid fatty acids are suitable biomarkers of dietary intakes across populations involved in a large European multicenter study. Design: A cross-sectional study design nested to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) was conducted to determine plasma fatty acid profiles in 〉 3000 subjects from 16 centers, who had also completed 24-h dietary recalls and dietary questionnaires. Plasma fatty acids were assessed by capillary gas chromatography. Ecological and individual correlations were calculated between fatty acids and select food groups. Results: The most important determinant of plasma fatty acids was region, which suggests that the variations across regions are largely due to different food intakes. Strong ecological correlations were observed between fish intake and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (r = 0.78, P 〈 0.01), olive oil and oleic acid (r = 0.73, P 〈 0.01), and margarine and elaidic acid (r = 0.76, P 〈 0.01). Individual correlations varied across the regions, particularly between olive oil and oleic acid and between alcohol and the saturation index, as an indicator of stearoyl CoA desaturase activity. Conclusions: These findings indicate that specific plasma phospholipid fatty acids are suitable biomarkers of some food intakes in the EPIC Study. Moreover, these findings suggest complex interactions between alcohol intake and fatty acid metabolism, which warrants further attention in epidemiologic studies relating dietary fatty acids to alcohol-related cancers and other chronic diseases. Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 89: 331-46
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19056549
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  • 3
    Keywords: Germany ; MODEL ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; OBESITY ; BODY ; body mass index ; VASCULAR-DISEASE ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; ADIPOSITY ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; waist-hip ratio ; Diabetes Mellitus ; Diabetes Complications ; COMPETING RISKS ; ANTHROPOMETRIC INDEXES ; CARDIOVASCULAR MORTALITY ; EXERCISE CAPACITY ; TO-HEIGHT RATIO
    Abstract: Individuals with diabetes mellitus are advised to achieve a healthy weight to prevent complications. However, fat mass distribution has hardly been investigated as a risk factor for diabetes complications. The authors studied associations between body mass index, waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, and waist/height ratio and mortality among individuals with diabetes mellitus. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, a subcohort was defined as 5,435 individuals with a confirmed self-report of diabetes mellitus at baseline in 1992-2000. Participants were aged 57.3 (standard deviation, 6.3) years, 54% were men, the median diabetes duration was 4.6 (interquartile range, 2.0-9.8) years, and 22% of the participants used insulin. Body mass index, as indicator of general obesity, was not associated with higher mortality, whereas all measurements of abdominal obesity showed a positive association. Associations generally were slightly weaker in women. The strongest association was observed for waist/height ratio: In the fifth quintile, the hazard rate ratio was 1.88 (95% confidence interval: 1.33, 2.65) for men and 2.46 (95% confidence interval: 1.46, 4.14) for women. Measurements of abdominal, but not general, adiposity were associated with higher mortality in diabetic individuals. The waist/height ratio showed the strongest association. Respective indicators might be investigated in risk prediction models
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21616928
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  • 4
    Keywords: FOOD-FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; EPIC PROJECT ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; LIFE-STYLE INTERVENTION ; GLYCEMIC-LOAD DIET ; RESTING ENERGY-EXPENDITURE ; OBESE YOUNG-ADULTS
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Dietary fiber, carbohydrate quality and quantity are associated with mortality risk in the general population. Whether this is also the case among diabetes patients is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To assess the associations of dietary fiber, glycemic load, glycemic index, carbohydrate, sugar, and starch intake with mortality risk in individuals with diabetes. METHODS: This study was a prospective cohort study among 6,192 individuals with confirmed diabetes mellitus (mean age of 57.4 years, and median diabetes duration of 4.4 years at baseline) from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Dietary intake was assessed at baseline (1992-2000) with validated dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards analysis was performed to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, while adjusting for CVD-related, diabetes-related, and nutritional factors. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 9.2 y, 791 deaths were recorded, 306 due to CVD. Dietary fiber was inversely associated with all-cause mortality risk (adjusted HR per SD increase, 0.83 [95% CI, 0.75-0.91]) and CVD mortality risk (0.76[0.64-0.89]). No significant associations were observed for glycemic load, glycemic index, carbohydrate, sugar, or starch. Glycemic load (1.42[1.07-1.88]), carbohydrate (1.67[1.18-2.37]) and sugar intake (1.53[1.12-2.09]) were associated with an increased total mortality risk among normal weight individuals (BMI〈/=25 kg/m(2); 22% of study population) but not among overweight individuals (P interaction〈/=0.04). These associations became stronger after exclusion of energy misreporters. CONCLUSIONS: High fiber intake was associated with a decreased mortality risk. High glycemic load, carbohydrate and sugar intake were associated with an increased mortality risk in normal weight individuals with diabetes.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22927948
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  • 5
    Keywords: POPULATION ; RISK ; BREAST-CANCER ; COLON-CANCER ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; susceptibility loci ; WHOLE-GENOME ; CASE-ONLY DESIGNS ; ASSOCIATION SCAN ; CHROMOSOME 11Q
    Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC), one of the most frequent neoplasias worldwide, has both genetic and environmental causes. As yet, however, gene-environment (G x E) interactions in CRC have been studied mostly for a small number of candidate genes only. Therefore, we investigated the possible interaction, in CRC etiology, between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the one hand, and overweight, smoking and alcohol consumption on the other, at a genome-wide level. To this end, we adopted a two-tiered approach comprising a case-only screening stage I (314 cases) and a case-control validation stage II (259 cases, 1,002 controls). Interactions with the smallest p value in stage I were verified in stage II using multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for sex and age. In addition, we specifically studied known CRC-associated SNPs for possible G x E interactions. Upon adjustment for sex and age, and after allowing for multiple testing, however, only a single SNP (rs1944511) was found to be involved in a statistically significant interaction, namely with overweight (multiplicity-corrected p = 0.042 in stage II). Several other G x E interactions were nominally significant but failed correction for multiple testing, including a previously reported interaction between rs9929218 and alcohol consumption that also emerged in our candidate SNP study (nominal p = 0.008). Notably, none of the interactions identified in our genome-wide analysis was with a previously reported CRC-associated SNP. Our study therefore highlights the potential of an "agnostic" genome-wide approach to G x E analysis.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23114982
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  • 6
    Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma ; Diabetes Mellitus ; biliary tract neoplasms ; diabetes duration ; gallbladder neoplasms ; insulin treatment
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Evidence on associations between self-reported diabetes mellitus, diabetes duration, age at diabetes diagnosis, insulin treatment, and risk of biliary tract cancer (BTC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), independent of general and abdominal obesity is scarce. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective analysis in the EPIC-cohort study among 363 426 participants with self-reported diabetes data. Multivariable adjusted relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated from Cox regression models. In a nested case-control subset, analyses were carried out in HCV/HBV-negative individuals. RESULTS: During 8.5 years of follow-up, 204 BTC cases [including 75 gallbladder cancer (GBC) cases], and 176 HCC cases were identified. Independent of body mass index and waist-to-height ratio diabetes status was associated with higher risk of BTC and HCC [1.77 (1.00-3.13) and 2.17 (1.36-3.47)]. For BTC, the risk seemed to be higher in participants with shorter diabetes duration and those not treated with insulin. Regarding cancer subsites, diabetes was only associated with GBC [2.72 (1.17-6.31)]. The risk for HCC was particularly higher in participants treated with insulin. The results were not appreciably different in HCV/HBV-negative individuals. CONCLUSION(S): This study supports the hypothesis that diabetes is a risk factor for BTC (particularly GBC) and HCC. Further research is required to establish whether diabetes treatment or duration is associated with these cancers.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23720454
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  • 7
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To study the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and annual relative change in anthropometric markers in the general German adult population. METHODS: Longitudinal data of 56,556 participants aged 18-83 years from seven population-based German cohort studies (CARLA, SHIP, KORA, DEGS, EPIC-Heidelberg, EPIC-Potsdam, PopGen) were analyzed by meta-analysis using a random-effects model. The indicators of SES were education and household income. RESULTS: On average, all participants gained weight and increased their waist circumference over the study's follow-up period. Men and women in the low education group had a 0.1 percentage points greater annual increase in weight (95% CI men: 0.06-0.20; and women: 0.06-0.12) and waist circumference (95% CI men: 0.01-0.45; and women: 0.05-0.22) than participants in the high education group. Women with low income had a 0.1 percentage points higher annual increase in weight (95% CI 0.00-0.15) and waist circumference (95% CI 0.00-0.14) than women with high income. No association was found for men between income and obesity markers. CONCLUSIONS: Participants with lower SES (education and for women also income) gained more weight and waist circumference than those with higher SES. These results underline the necessity to evaluate the risk of weight gain based on SES to develop more effective preventive measures.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26833586
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  • 8
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: It is widely believed that cancer can be prevented by high intake of fruits and vegetables. However, inconsistent results from many studies have not been able to conclusively establish an inverse association between fruit and vegetable intake and overall cancer risk. METHODS: We conducted a prospective analysis of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort to assess relationships between intake of total fruits, total vegetables, and total fruits and vegetables combined and cancer risk during 1992-2000. Detailed information on the dietary habit and lifestyle variables of the cohort was obtained. Cancer incidence and mortality data were ascertained, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable Cox regression models. Analyses were also conducted for cancers associated with tobacco and alcohol after stratification for tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. RESULTS: Of the initial 142 605 men and 335 873 women included in the study, 9604 men and 21 000 women were identified with cancer after a median follow-up of 8.7 years. The crude cancer incidence rates were 7.9 per 1000 person-years in men and 7.1 per 1000 person-years in women. Associations between reduced cancer risk and increased intake of total fruits and vegetables combined and total vegetables for the entire cohort were similar (200 g/d increased intake of fruits and vegetables combined, HR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96 to 0.99; 100 g/d increased intake of total vegetables, HR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.97 to 0.99); intake of fruits showed a weaker inverse association (100 g/d increased intake of total fruits, HR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.98 to 1.00). The reduced risk of cancer associated with high vegetable intake was restricted to women (HR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.97 to 0.99). Stratification by alcohol intake suggested a stronger reduction in risk in heavy drinkers and was confined to cancers caused by smoking and alcohol. CONCLUSIONS: A very small inverse association between intake of total fruits and vegetables and cancer risk was observed in this study. Given the small magnitude of the observed associations, caution should be applied in their interpretation.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20371762
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; DIETARY-FAT ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; MISSING DATA ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; MULTIPLE IMPUTATION ; CLINICAL-RESEARCH ; AMERICAN-HEART-ASSOCIATION
    Abstract: Aims/hypothesis Thus far, it is unclear whether lifestyle recommendations for people with diabetes should be different from those for the general public. We investigated whether the associations between lifestyle factors and mortality risk differ between individuals with and without diabetes. Methods Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a cohort was formed of 6,384 persons with diabetes and 258,911 EPIC participants without known diabetes. Joint Cox proportional hazard regression models of people with and without diabetes were built for the following lifestyle factors in relation to overall mortality risk: BMI, waist/height ratio, 26 food groups, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, smoking. Likelihood ratio tests for heterogeneity assessed statistical differences in regression coefficients. Results Multivariable adjusted mortality risk among individuals with diabetes compared with those without was increased, with an HR of 1.62 (95% CI 1.51, 1.75). Intake of fruit, legumes, nuts, seeds, pasta, poultry and vegetable oil was related to a lower mortality risk, and intake of butter and margarine was related to an increased mortality risk. These associations were significantly different in magnitude from those in diabetes-free individuals, but directions were similar. No differences between people with and without diabetes were detected for the other lifestyle factors. Conclusions/interpretation Diabetes status did not substantially influence the associations between lifestyle and mortality risk. People with diabetes may benefit more from a healthy diet, but the directions of association were similar. Thus, our study suggests that lifestyle advice with respect to mortality for patients with diabetes should not differ from recommendations for the general population.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24132780
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  • 10
    Keywords: GROWTH ; MORTALITY ; ASSOCIATION ; VARIANTS ; TRIAL ; METAANALYSIS ; TESTOSTERONE ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; ENDOGENOUS SEX-HORMONES ; METFORMIN
    Abstract: The current epidemiologic evidence suggests that men with type 2 diabetes mellitus may be at lower risk of developing prostate cancer, but little is known about its association with stage and grade of the disease. The association between self-reported diabetes mellitus at recruitment and risk of prostate cancer was examined in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Among 139,131 eligible men, 4,531 were diagnosed with prostate cancer over an average follow-up of 12 years. Multivariable hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models stratified by EPIC-participating center and age at recruitment, and adjusted for education, smoking status, body mass index, waist circumference, and physical activity. In a subset of men without prostate cancer, the cross-sectional association between circulating concentrations of androgens and insulin-like growth factor proteins with diabetes status was also investigated using linear regression models. Compared to men with no diabetes, men with diabetes had a 26% lower risk of prostate cancer (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.63-0.86). There was no evidence that the association differed by stage (p-heterogeneity, 0.19) or grade (p-heterogeneity, 0.48) of the disease, although the numbers were small in some disease subgroups. In a subset of 626 men with hormone measurements, circulating concentrations of androstenedione, total testosterone and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-three were lower in men with diabetes compared to men without diabetes. This large European study has confirmed an inverse association between self-reported diabetes mellitus and subsequent risk of prostate cancer. What's new? Emerging evidence suggests that men with type 2 diabetes are at lower risk to develop prostate cancer. Using data obtained within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), the authors show that the prostate cancer risk was, indeed, reduced by 26% in men with type 2 diabetes but no association with cancer stage or grade was observed. In a subset of men for whom data on circulating hormones were available, levels of androstenedione, total testosterone and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-three were lower in those with diabetes as compared to those without diabetes, giving clues to how having diabetes could affect prostate cancer development.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24862312
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