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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Plant Science Letters 22 (1981), S. 211-217 
    ISSN: 0304-4211
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Plant Science Letters 23 (1981), S. 269-276 
    ISSN: 0304-4211
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 0304-4211
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1615-6102
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary A comparison of transmembrane potential (pd) properties of parenchyma cells and giant transfer cells induced by a root-knot nematode in the roots ofImpatiens balsamina has been made. Apart from some differences in rate of response to a few treatments, parenchyma and giant cells had similar pd values; active and passive components of the pd (cyanide, azide); responses to total ion concentration, pH and potassium concentration; responses to protein synthesis inhibitors (puromycin, cycloheximide and actinomycin D) and responses to sugars. Both parenchyma cells and giant cells are depolarized by puromycin, cycloheximide and actinomycin D. The cells recover from the depolarization in the presence of cycloheximide, suggesting that this presumed protein synthesis inhibitor does not act in a straight-forward manner. The cells do not recover in the presence of puromycin or actinomycin D. Parenchyma cells and giant cells clearly have different metabolic rates and ion fluxes, but their pd responses are the same. This suggests that the pd does not reflect metabolic activity or ion fluxes of a cell, but is strictly controlled in itself. Part of this control may be via a feedback mechanism acting on an electrogenic pump. The depolarization caused by glucose is induced by aging the cells after excision. The effect is discussed in terms of an H+ dependent cotransport system and an ATPase permease system. The apparent normality of pd responses of nematode-induced giant transfer cells suggests that they may be a useful model system for experiments on higher plant cells.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Protoplasma 80 (1974), S. 401-405 
    ISSN: 1615-6102
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary In a study of membrane potential properties of giant cells induced in the roots ofImpatiens balsamina by a rootknot nematode, trains of action potential-like fluctuations were recorded. Giant cells are multinucleate transfer cells, and it is suggested that the occurrence of action potentials may be characteristic of transfer cells.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1399-3054
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Leaves of 12-week-old tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Samsun NN) were infiltrated with suspensions of Pseudomonas syringae pv, pisi (DSM 50291) to induce hypersensitive reaction (HR). Cotyledons of 2-week-old cotton plants (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv. Acala 442 and Coker BR) were infiltrated with Xanthomonas campestris pv. malvacearum (race 10) to induce the disease. In tobacco, HR-related increases in NH+4 levels started within 2 h after infection and continued up to the time of tissue decay. Increase of NH+4 and especially K+ efflux were detected in intercellular washing fluids (IWF). Antibiotics stopped and later reverted NH+4 production and K+ efflux, but only if applied within 2 h after infection. When 10 mM NH+4 was injected into leaves, it was rapidly consumed from the IWF, and also, although more slowly, within the leaf cells. The concomitant K+ efflux was strong but delayed, and most of the K+ was reabsorbed after 2 h. Bacterial cell multiplication in HR stopped before the appearance of HR symptoms and cell necrosis. In the compatible reaction in cotton cotyledons, both NH+4accumulation and K+ efflux proceeded much more slowly than in the HR with tobacco, and bacteria continued to multiply until general cell necrosis occurred. The compatible reaction developed faster in constant darkness than in a light/dark rhythm. Bacterial enzymes produced NH+4, mainly from proteins of host cells, in both light and darkness. Continuous light delayed the main peak of both NH+4 production and K+ efflux. High CO2 concentration inhibited both processes, thus indicating that photorespiration plays a role in enhancing the release of free ammonium during bacterial pathogenesis. This is supported by shifts in the pattern of amino acids. The results demonstrate the accelerating and aggravating effect of ammonium in pathogenesis and HR, though ammonium is not the primary agent.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1365-3040
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract. In leaves of three different cultivars of cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata), the fungal toxin fusi-coccin (FC) induced a plasmalemma depolarization from -175 to -100mV, a value slightly below the N2-determined diffusion potential in the dark, and to a lesser extent in the light. The depolarization was preceded by the usual initial membrane hyperpolarization (up to 18mV). The membrane depolarization was accompanied by considerable K+ efflux and extracellular alkalinization. Primary and secondary leaves as well as stem tissue of plants, grown under long-day conditions or in the dark responded similarly. Dark O2 uptake in leaves and hypocotyls was stimulated by FC by up to 77 and 87%, respectively. In contrast, FC caused a typical Em hyperpolarization, K+ influx, extracellular acidification and smaller stimulation of respiration (50%) in leaves of other legumes such as mungbean (Vigna radiata), or soybean (Glycine max). Leaves of navy beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) revealed an intermediate response to FC. The unusual effect of FC in Vigna might be related to the production of toxic catabolites during degradation and fermentation of storage products necessary to meet the strong energy requirement of the pm-H+ ATPase.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 0168-9452
    Keywords: HV-toxin ; HmT-toxin ; K^+ efflux ; liposomes ; phytotoxins ; tentoxin
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Planta 139 (1978), S. 149-153 
    ISSN: 1432-2048
    Keywords: Hexose uptake ; Invertase ; Lemna ; Photosynthesis ; Respiration
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Growth of autotrophically growing duck-weeds (Lemna gibba L., G1) was stimulated by sucrose. The rate of respiration increased when plants had been grown on sucrose (8.7 μmol O2 g-1 fresh weight (FW) h-1) and was reduced after growth without sucrose in the dark or under longday conditions (2.5 μmol O2 g-1 FW h-1). Photosynthesis was induced already by low light intensities (0.1 klx). Short-time application of glucose or sucrose stimulated respiration in proportion to the hexose uptake rate. Sucrose is probably not taken up as the disaccharide. The transported sugar species after addition of sucrose are its hexose moieties produced by the high activity of the cell wall invertase. Fructose stimulated to a lesser extent; mannitol induced no enhancement; 2-deoxyglucose slightly inhibited O2 uptake. After mild carbon starvation of the plants the uptake of glucose and 3-O-methylglucose proceeded without any lag phase, with similar saturation kinetics in both cases. The initial uptake rate at substrate saturation was 2.6 μmol glucose g-1 FW h-1 in the dark. Light stimulated hexose uptake by 2 to 3 times. The results show that Lemna gibba has an energy-dependent constitutive system for hexose uptake.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Planta 161 (1984), S. 46-52 
    ISSN: 1432-2048
    Keywords: Lemna (phosphate uptake) ; Membrane potential ; Proton/phosphate cotransport
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Phosphate uptake was studied by determining [32P]phosphate influx and by measurements of the electrical membrane potential in duckweed (Lemna gibba L.). Phosphate-induced membrane depolarization (ΔE m ) was controlled by the intracellular phosphate content, thus maximal ΔE m by 1 mM H2PO 4 - was up to 133 mV after 15d of phosphate starvation. The ΔE m was strongly dependent on the extracellular pH, with a sharp optimum at pH 5.7. It is suggested that phosphate uptake is energized by the electrochemical proton gradient, proceeding by a 2H+/H2PO 4 - contransport mechanism. This is supported also by the fusicoccin stimulation of phosphate influx. Kinetics of phosphate influx and of ΔE m , which represent mere plasmalemma transport, are best described by two Michaelis-Menten terms without any linear components.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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