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  • 1
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  3. Wissenschaftlicher Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Essstörungen; 20120223-20120225; Hannover; DOC12dgess033 /20120208/
    Publication Date: 2012-02-08
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: German
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 2
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  5. Wissenschaftlicher Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Essstörungen; 20160303-20160305; Essen; DOC16dgess067 /20160218/
    Publication Date: 2016-02-19
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: German
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 3
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  5. Wissenschaftlicher Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Essstörungen; 20160303-20160305; Essen; DOC16dgess064 /20160218/
    Publication Date: 2016-02-19
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: German
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1365-2842
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: summary  This study was aimed at investigating the internal adaptation of a ceramic (Ceramco II) and two composite resin inlay materials (SureFil and 3M Filtek Z 250TM) using silicon replica technique as an indicator. Forty-five standard mesial–occlusal–distal (MOD) cavities were prepared into brass moulds by using computer numerically controlled system. Inlays were prepared according to manufacturers’ instructions with indirect methods. Replicas of the prepared cavities and inlays were produced with a polyvinyl siloxane material (Elite H-D). The spaces between inlays and cavities were filled by different coloured light-body polyvinyl siloxane material. Two parallel slices (mesio-distally) were obtained from the replicas with a sharp blade. Different coloured polyvinyl siloxane material thickness between cavity and inlay was measured at seven points (mesial, occlusal and distal). The data were evaluated with anova and Tukey's honestly significantly different (HSD) statistical tests. In the SureFil and Ceramco II groups, the sizes of the contraction gaps at mesial and distal gingival floors were greater than that of the occlusal marginal walls. In comparison of gap formation at occlusal regions, while the 3M composite group showed highest gap values (204·33 ± 75·45 μm), the Ceramco II group revealed the lowest (141·17 ± 23·66 μm) (P 〈 0·05). At the gingival floors, gap formation of Ceramco II group was the highest (227·08 ± 51·95 μm). Neither the 3M Filtek Z250 nor SureFil group showed any statistical difference between gap values of their self-occlusal and gingival floors (P 〉 0·05). In conclusion, our results showed that ceramic inlays did not confer any big advantage for internal adaptation over the composite inlays.
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1365-2842
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: summary  In this study, the effects of home bleaching agents that contains carbamide peroxide (in different concentrations such as 10 and 15%) on the surface hardness of human enamel and dentine were evaluated. The buccal surfaces of 90 recently extracted human mandibular anterior teeth were used. The specimens in the dentine group were ground to expose of dentine surface. Then, samples in both enamel and dentine group were randomly divided into six main groups with 15 in each group. In the group 1 and 4, 15% carbamide peroxide was applied to the enamel and dentine surfaces and then the teeth were left in an incubator at 37 °C and 100% humidity for 4 h first, then left 28 h after repeating the same procedures seven times. The teeth were treated with 10% carbamide peroxide in groups 2 and 5 and distilled water in groups 3 and 6 (control groups), using the same procedures. Vicker's microhardness of enamel and dentine were assessed on each tooth before and after each treatment period (4 and 28 h). The hardness of control group specimens was also obtained after 4 h in distilled water and then after 28 h. For statistical analysis one-way anova and post-hoc Tukey tests were used. For both 10 and 15%, there were no statistically significant differences between the untreated control specimens and the specimens treated with the bleaching materials for enamel and dentine at any given measurement time (P 〉 0·05). Nevertheless, in vivo use of bleaching agents on tooth hard tissues requires further analysis.
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Science Ltd
    Journal of oral rehabilitation 30 (2003), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1365-2842
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: summary  This in vitro study assessed comparatively the shear bond strengths of three composite resins, 3M Valux Plus (3MVP), Herculite (H), Clearfil AP-X (CAP-X), a polyacid modified composite resin Dyract (D), and a resin modified glass–ionomer materials Vitremer (V), to cervical and buccal dentine regions of extracted human molar teeth. Four different bonding systems, 3M ScotchBond Multipurpose (SB), Clearfil Liner Bond 2 (LB2), Opti Bond (OB), and Prime & Bond 2·1 (PB 2·1) were used with the manufacturer's respective composite and compomer materials. One hundred freshly extracted mandibular molar teeth were selected for this study. Flat buccal dentine surfaces were created on 50 teeth and cylindrical rods of the five materials were bonded to the dentine surfaces. For assessment of cervical bond strengths, the materials were bonded to mesial and distal enamel bordered occlusal dentinal surfaces of the remaining 50 teeth. The five groups of restorative procedures were applied as follows; Group 1: SB + 3MVP, Group 2: LB2 + CAP-X, Group 3: OB + H, Group 4: PB2·1 + D, Group 5: Vitremer primer (VP) VP + V. Each restorative procedure thus had 20 specimens (10 buccal + 10 cervical). After 24 h of water storage (37 °C), the specimens were tested on a Universal Testing machine in shear with a cross head speed of 0·5 mm min−1. The bond strength values were calculated in MPa and the results were evaluated statistically using Kruskal–Wallis one-way/anova and Mann–Whitney U-tests. It was found that the bond strengths of SB + 3MVP, LB2 + CAP-X and VP + V to buccal dentine surfaces were significantly stronger (P 〈 0·05) than those to the occluso-cervical dentine floors. When the bond strengths to the occluso-cervical dentine and buccal dentine surface were compared, there was no significant difference between the materials (P 〉 0·05). Vitremer was found the least successful adhesive material in terms of shear bond strength on both buccal and occluso-cervical dentine surfaces.
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1365-2842
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare marginal leakage of Class II amalgam restorations lined with different agents (two new generation dentin bonding systems, a cavity varnish and an amalgam liner). Forty freshly extracted human molar teeth were divided into five groups. Class II preparations were prepared in the mesial and distal surfaces of each molar. While the cavities in two groups were lined with two new generation bonding systems, the other two groups were treated with an amalgam lining material and a cavity varnish. Fifth group was used as control, without any lining. Amalgam* was hand-condensed into each preparation. Specimens were thermocycled, stained and sectioned. Microleakage was graded using a stereomicroscope. Mean microleakage scores for occlusal and cervical margins were calculated and analised. For the leakage values on occlusal margins, Kruskal–Wallis test indicated no significant difference in all groups. For the leakage values on cervical margins, Kruskal–Wallis test indicated significant difference in four groups when compared with controls (P 〈 0·001). On the other hand, there was no significant difference between the occlusal and cervical leakage values in each group.
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  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford UK : Blackwell Science Ltd
    Journal of oral rehabilitation 29 (2002), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1365-2842
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary Five current dentin adhesives were evaluated for their ability to bond to caries-affected dentin. The materials were: total etch [Solid Bond (SB)], two self-etch [Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), Etch and Prime (EP)], two one bottle [Prime and Bond 2·1 (PB), One Coat Bond (OCB)]. Sixty extracted molar teeth with proximal caries (mesial or distal) extending into mid-dentin were used. By grinding normal and caries-affected proximal surfaces, flat dentin surfaces were obtained. The surfaces were then bonded with each adhesive system and composite resins were added to the surfaces by packing the material into a cylindrical-shaped plastic matrix with an internal diameter of 2·5 mm and height of 3 mm. Shear bond testing was performed following 10 days incubation of specimens in distilled water at 37 °C. Results were analysed by Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA, and Mann–Whitney U multiple comparison test and Wilcoxon rank tests. The results obtained with CSE, SB, and EP were similar in caries affected and normal dentin (P 〉 0·05). But bonds made to normal dentin with OCB and PB were lower (P 〈 0·05) than bonds to caries-affected dentin. Bonding to caries-affected dentin with CSE (24·49 ± 5·38), SB (21·49 ± 9·15), and EP (21·19 ± 9·17) showed shear bond strengths higher than OCB (17·43 ± 9·78) and PB (14·10 ± 7·94) (P 〈 0·05). Bonding to normal dentin with CSE (29·91 ± 8·95) was the highest (P 〈 0·05). SB (21·17 ± 5·41) and EP (17·45 ± 6·21) showed shear bond strengths higher than OCB (11·99 ± 10·15) and PB (10·57 ± 4·56) (P 〈 0·05).
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1708-8240
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate microleakage of Class II composite restorations using a self-etching adhesive system with additional enamel etching and/or a flowable resin composite material. Materials and Methods: Fifty standardized Class II cavities were prepared in the mesial and distal surfaces of extracted human third molars. All teeth were bonded with a self-etching primer adhesive system (Clearfil® Liner Bond 2, Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan) according to the manufacturer's instructions and were restored with a resin composite (Clearfil® AP-X, Kuraray Co. Ltd.). In the control group, only a self-etching adhesive system was used. In the various experimental groups, the preparation surfaces were coated with a layer of flowable resin composite (Protect® Liner F, Kuraray Co. Ltd.) before the placement of resin composite, etched with 37% phosphoric acid (K-Etchant®, Kkraray Co. Ltd.) before the application of the adhesive system, or treated with both of these options. In four groups of specimens, the preparation had a gingival margin in enamel. In a fifth group, the gingival margin was in dentin. All teeth were subjected to thermocycling, 300 cycles between 4°C and 60°C, and were sectioned in half through the restorations. Gaps or cracks at the resin-tooth interfaces were observed directly using a laser scanning microscope and were recorded as percentages of the entire interface length. Results: Separate enamel etching with phosphoric acid did not improve the resin-enamel seal produced by the self-etching primer alone. Flowable resin composite produced gap-free resin-dentin interfaces but could not prevent cracks and gap formation at the resin-enamel interface. Conclusions: Neither flowable resin composite nor enamel etching could prevent gap formation at enamel-resin interfaces and crack formation in enamel walls when used with a self-etching primer adhesive system. However, the flowable composite provided gap-free resin-dentin interfaces.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1435-1536
    Keywords: Key words Scanning tunneling microscopy ; Latex ; Nanoparticles ; Film formation
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics
    Notes: Abstract  Latexes as dispersions of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-butyl methacrylate) copolymeric nanoparticles within water were produced by microemulsion polymerization of the respective comonomers. Polymer yield, number-average and weight-average molecular weights, polydispersity index, and the glass-transition temperature of the copolymer produced were 50%, 8.8 × 104, 2.54 × 105, 2.87, and 45 °C. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of the latex nanoparticles and film formation on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) were obtained with a 2 V sample bias and a tunneling current of 20 pA. The STM pictures revealed that the particle size was 18 ± 3 nm. There was no film formation in the case of dehydration at room temperature. There was some coalesence of particles when the HOPG surface was preheated at 55 °C, while complete film formation was achieved when the latexes were annealed at 55 °C in an oven for about 10 min.
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