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  • 1
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; APOPTOSIS ; CELLS ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; proliferation ; CELL ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; liver ; PROTEIN ; DIFFERENTIATION ; MICE ; ACTIVATION ; MECHANISM ; FAMILY ; T cells ; MEMBERS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; antibody ; DELETION ; MOUSE ; RATES ; DAMAGE ; B-CELLS ; INJURY ; FAMILIES ; development ; FULMINANT HEPATIC-FAILURE ; HUMAN HEPATOCELLULAR-CARCINOMA ; MCL-1 ; MAINTENANCE ; GROWTH-FACTORS ; OCCURS ; 33 ; ANTI-FAS ; BCL-2 PROTEINS
    Abstract: Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) is an antiapoptotic member of the Bcl-2 protein family. It interacts with proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, thereby inhibiting mitochondrial activation and induction of apoptosis. Mcl-1 is essential for embryonal development and the maintenance of B cells, T cells, and hematopoietic stem cells. We have recently shown that induction of Mcl-1 by growth factors rescues primary human hepatocy-tes from CD95-mediated apoptosis. This prompted us to further analyze the relevance of Mcl-1 for hepatocellular homeostasis. Therefore, we generated a hepatocyte-specific Mcl-1 knockout mouse (Mcl-1(flox/flox)-AlbCre). Deletion of Mcl-1 in hepatocytes results in liver cell damage caused by spontaneous induction of apoptosis. Livers of Mcl-1(flox/flox)-AlbCre mice are smaller compared to control littermates, due to higher apoptosis rates. As a compensatory mechanism, proliferation of hepatocytes is enhanced in the absence of Mcl-1. Importantly, hepatic pericellular fibrosis occurs in Mcl-1 negative livers in response to chronic liver damage. Furthermore, Mcl-1(flox/flox)-AlbCre mice are more susceptible to hepatocellular damage induced by agonistic anti-CD95 antibodies or concanavalin A. Conclusion: The present study provides in vivo evidence that Mcl-1 is a crucial antiapoptotic factor for the liver, contributing to hepatocellular homeostasis and protecting hepatocytes from apoptosis induction. (HEPATOLOGY 2009;49:627-636.)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19127517
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  • 2
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; proliferation ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; carcinoma ; CELL ; Germany ; IN-VIVO ; PATHWAY ; VIVO ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; HEPATOCELLULAR-CARCINOMA ; liver ; PROTEIN ; TUMORS ; MICE ; MECHANISM ; FAMILY ; MARKER ; CARCINOGENESIS ; DELETION ; hepatocellular carcinoma ; CELL-DEATH ; AGE ; DAMAGE ; REGULATOR ; MITOSIS ; Bcl-2 ; INJURY ; HUMAN CANCER ; SURVIVIN ; cell death ; CANCERS ; HOMEOSTASIS ; HUMAN HEPATOCELLULAR-CARCINOMA ; MCL-1 ; LIVER-REGENERATION
    Abstract: Regulation of hepatocellular apoptosis is crucial for liver homeostasis. Increased sensitivity of hepatocytes toward apoptosis results in chronic liver injury, whereas apoptosis resistance is linked to hepatocarcinogenesis and nonresponsiveness to therapy-induced cell death. Recently, we have demonstrated an essential role of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) in hepatocyte survival. In mice lacking Mcl-1 specifically in hepatocytes (Mcl-1(Delta hep)), spontaneous apoptosis caused severe liver damage. Here, we demonstrate that chronically increased apoptosis of hepatocytes coincides with strong hepatocyte proliferation resulting in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Liver cell tumor formation was observed in 〉50% of Mcl-1(Delta hep) mice already by the age of 8 months, whereas 12-month-old wild-type (wt) and heterozygous Mcl-1(flox/wt) mice lacked tumors. Tumors revealed a heterogenous spectrum ranging from small dysplastic nodules to HCC. The neoplastic nature of the tumors was confirmed by histology, expression of the HCC marker glutamine synthetase and chromosomal aberrations. Liver carcinogenesis in Mcl-1(Delta hep) mice was paralleled by markedly increased levels of Survivin, an important regulator of mitosis which is selectively overexpressed in common human cancers. Conclusion: This study provides in vivo evidence that increased apoptosis of hepatocytes not only impairs liver homeostasis but is also accompanied by hepatocyte proliferation and hepatocarcinogenesis. Our findings might have implications for understanding apoptosis-related human liver diseases. (HEPATOLOGY 2010;51:1226-1236.)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20099303
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