Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    ISSN: 1432-0983
    Keywords: Gene mapping ; Rearrangements ; Chloroplast DNA evolution ; Inverted repeat
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary Cloned genes from tobacco, spinach, and pea were used as hybridization probes to localize 36 protein genes on the chloroplast chromosomes of four legumes — mung bean, common bean, soybean, and pea. The first three chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs), all of which retain a large inverted repeat, have an identical gene order with but one exception. A 78 kb segment encompassing nearly the entire large single copy region is inverted in mung bean and common bean relative to soybean and non-legumes. The simplest evolutionary explanation for this difference is a 78 kb inversion, with one endpoint between rps8 and infA and the second between psbA and rpl2. However, we can not rule out a two-step re-arrangement (consisting of successive expansion and contraction of the inverted repeat) leading to the relocation of a block of six ribosomal protein genes (rps19-rps8) from one end of the large single copy region to the other. Analysis of gene locations in pea cpDNA, which lacks the large inverted repeat, combined with cross-hybridization studies using 59 clones covering the mung bean genome, leads to a refined picture of the position and nature of the numerous rearrangements previously described in the pea genome. A minimum of eight large inversions are postulated to account for these rearrangements. None of these inversions disrupt groups of genes that are transcriptionally linked in angiosperm cpDNA. Rather, the end-points of inversions are associated with relatively spacer-rich segments of the genome, many of which contain tRNA genes. All of the pea-specific inversions are shown to be positionally distinct from those recently described in a closely related legume, broad bean.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1432-0983
    Keywords: Chloroplast genome evolution ; Inverted repeat ; Inversion ; Repeated sequence
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary We have compared the sequence organization of four previously uncharacterized legume chloroplast DNAs - from alfalfa, lupine, wisteria and subclover — to that of legume chloroplast DNAs that either retain a large, ribosomal RNA-encoding inverted repeat (mung bean) or have deleted one half of this repeat (broad bean). The circular, 126 kilobase pair (kb) alfalfa chloroplast genome, like those of broad bean and pea, lacks any detectable repeated sequences and contains only a single set of ribosomal RNA genes. However, in contrast to broad bean and pea, alfalfa chloroplast DNA is unrearranged (except for the deletion of one segment of the inverted repeat) relative to chloroplast DNA from mung bean. Together with other findings reported here, these results allow us to determine which of the four possible inverted repeat configurations was deleted in the alfalfa-pea-broad bean lineage, and to show how the present-day broad bean genome may have been derived from an alfalfa-like ancestral genome by two major sequence inversions. The 147 kb lupine chloroplast genome contains a 22 kb inverted repeat and has essentially complete colinearity with the mung bean genome. In contrast, the 130 kb wisteria genome has deleted one half of the inverted repeat and appears colinear with the alfalfa genome. The 140 kb subclover genome has been extensively rearranged and contains a family of at least five dispersed repetitive sequence elements, each several hundred by in size; this is the first report of dispersed repeats of this size in a land plant chloroplast genome. We conclude that the inverted repeat has been lost only once among legumes and that this loss occurred prior to all the other rearrangements observed in subclover, broad bean and pea. Of those lineages that lack the inverted repeat, some are stable and unrearranged, other have undergone a moderate amount of rearrangement, while still others have sustained a complex series of rearrangement either with or without major sequence duplications and transpositions.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...