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  • 1
    ISSN: 1399-3038
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Several studies have evaluated the value of cord blood IgE concentrations for predicting the risk of allergic disease in children. In all of these studies it is necessary to exclude cord blood samples in which the IgE may be falsely elevated due to admixing of maternal and fetal blood during parturition. The most common method for detecting mixing of fetal and maternal blood is measurement of cord blood IgA concentrations. We have examined the theoretical basis of IgA measurements for detecting maternal blood contamination and reexamined our own data to evaluate IgA measurements. Our data suggest that the average IgA concentration of 28. 2 μg/ml used in previous studies may not adequately exclude contaminated cord blood sample. Failure to reject contaminated cord blood samples would reduce the positive predictive value of cord btood IgE measurements.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1398-9995
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Background: Although beef is a main source of protein in Western diets, very little has been published on allergic reactions to beef or the main allergens implicated in these reactions. The aim was to evaluate the IgE antibody response to beef in suspected meat-allergic subjects and assess cross-reactivity of beef with other vertebrate meats. Methods: Fifty-seven sera from suspected meat-allergic subjects were tested by grid blot for specific IgE antibodies to vertebrate meats (beef, lamb, pork, venison, and chicken), and the patterns of recognition of meat proteins were assessed by immunoblot studies. Results: A 160-kDa band, identified as bovine IgG, was detected in raw beef in 83% (10/12) of beef-allergic subjects but in only 24% of the beef-tolerant subjects. IgE reactivity to a band of similar mol. mass was detected also in lamb and venison, but rarely in pork or chicken. Complete inhibition of the IgE reactivity to the bovine IgG was obtained with lamb, venison, and milk. IgE reactivity to this band also completely disappeared when beef or lamb extracts were separated under reducing conditions, indicating conformational epitopes. Conclusions: Bovine IgG appears to be a major cross-reacting meat allergen that could predict beef allergy. Further studies with oral IgG challenges should be performed to document the conclusion that in vitro reactivity correlates with clinical hypersensitivity. The role of bovine IgG in other bovine products such as milk, dander, or hair must also be studied, and the hypothesis that it is a cross-reacting allergen with other mammalian products validated.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    ISSN: 1365-2222
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Background A family history of atopy, and cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration, have been shown to be predictors of atopic disease in children. Several studies have suggested that parental atopy may be related to newborn immunoglobulin E. Objective The purpose of our analysis was to evaluate whether parental history of allergic disease was associated with cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration. Methods The study subjects were from a defined population of 777 newborns delivered between 1987 and 1989. The mothers of these children completed a questionnaire during pregnancy concerning themselves and the child's father, including parental history of physician diagnosis of allergic diseases (allergies, hay fever and asthma). Total immunoglobulin E levels were quantitated in cord blood samples with an enzyme-hnked immunoassay.Results Median cord blood immunoglobulin E concentration was higher among infants whose mothers had a history of atopic disease, particularly for those with a history of asthma (P〈0.022) and allergen immunotherapy (P〈0.016) vs infants whose mothers had no history of any atopic disease. Comparing all babies with a maternal history of asthma, to babies where neither parent had a history of any atopic disease, the median cord blood immunoglobulin E was significantly higher (0.36IU/mL vs 0.21 IU/mL; P〈0.009). This association was found only among female infants (0.49IU/mL vs 0.20 IU/mL; P〈0.001).Conclusion Maternal, but not paternal, history of atopic disease was associated with an elevated immunoglobulin E among newborns. For maternal asthma, this association was only evident in infant girls.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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