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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; DIAGNOSIS ; LUNG-CANCER ; HISTORY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; METABOLISM ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; DELETION ; MUTANT ; GLUTATHIONE ; AGE ; smoking ; cancer risk ; CARRIERS ; case-control studies ; TOBACCO ; CANCER-RESEARCH ; M1 ; glutathione-S-transferase ; GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE ; case-control study ; ENVIRONMENTAL CARCINOGENS ; GSTM1 ; GSTT1 ; METAANALYSIS ; CLASS-MU ; GSTT1 POLYMORPHISMS
    Abstract: The glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes are involved in the metabolism of various carcinogens. Deletion polymorphisms in the genes GSTM1 and GSTT1 and a base transition polymorphism at codon 105 (Ile--〉Val) in GSTP1 were investigated in relation to breast cancer risk. Tobacco smoking and reproductive factors were examined as potential effect modifiers. Individual data from seven case-control studies were pooled within the International Collaborative Study on Genetic Susceptibility to Environmental Carcinogens. To measure the effect of GSTs on breast cancer risk, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed adjusting for study center and age. The modifying effect was investigated by stratification on variables of smoking habits and reproductive history. A total of 2,048 cases with breast cancer and 1,969 controls were analyzed. The relative odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of breast cancer was 0.98 (0.86-1.12) with the GSTM1 null, 1.11 (0.87-1.41) with the GSTT1 null, 1.01 (0.79-1.28) with GSTP1 heterozygous mutants, and 0.93 (0.62-1.38) with GSTP1 homozygous mutants. Stratification by smoking or reproductive factors did not reveal a modifying effect of these variables, nor was there any association between GSTM1 and age at diagnosis of breast cancer. This is the largest study investigating susceptibility to breast cancer due to polymorphisms in the GST genes. The results conclusively show that single gene GST polymorphisms do not confer a substantial risk of breast cancer to its carriers. Furthermore, GSTs did not interact with smoking or reproductive history to modify cancer risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15342448
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; INFORMATION ; EXPOSURE ; NEW-YORK ; RISK ; ENZYMES ; GENE ; GENES ; SAMPLE ; METABOLISM ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; DIFFERENCE ; smoking ; DATABASE ; case-control studies ; TOBACCO ; INDIVIDUALS ; BEHAVIOR ; CONSUMPTION ; SMOKERS ; SUBSET ; NICOTINE METABOLISM ; pooled analysis,molecular epidemiology,smoking ; SMOKING-BEHAVIOR
    Abstract: Polymorphisms in genes that encode for metabolic enzymes have been associated with variations in enzyme activity between individuals. Such variations could be associated with differences in individual exposure to carcinogens that are metabolized by these genes. In this study, we examine the association between polymorphisms in several metabolic genes and the consumption of tobacco in a large sample of healthy individuals. The database of the International Collaborative Study on Genetic Susceptibility to Environmental Carcinogens was used. All the individuals who were controls from the case-control studies included in the data set with information on smoking habits and on genetic polymorphisms were selected (n = 20,938). Sufficient information was available on the following genes that are involved in the metabolism of tobacco smoke constituents: CYPIAI, GSTMI, GSTTI, NAT2 and GSTPI. None of the tested genes was clearly associated with smoking behavior. Information on smoking dose, available for a subset of subjects, showed no effect of metabolic gene polymorphisms on the amount of smoking. No association between polymorphisms in the genes studied and tobacco consumption was observed; therefore, no effect of these genes on smoking behavior should be expected. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15069692
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