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  • 1
    Keywords: 3, biotechnology, development, EXPERIENCE, FLEXIBILITY, FORMAT, Genetic, genetics, Guideline, LIFE,
    Abstract: The Functional Genomics Experiment data model (FuGE) has been developed to increase the consistency and efficiency of experimental data modeling in the life sciences, and it has been adopted by a number of high-profile standardization organizations. FuGE can be used: (1) directly, whereby generic modeling constructs are used to represent concepts from specific experimental activities; or (2) as a framework within which methodspecific models can be developed. FuGE is both rich and flexible, providing a considerable number of modeling constructs, which can be used in a range of different ways. However, such richness and flexibility also mean that modelers and application developers have choices to make when applying FuGE in a given context. This paper captures emerging best practice in the use of FuGE in the light of the experience of several groups by: (1) proposing guidelines for the use and extension of the FuGE data model; (2) presenting design patterns that reflect recurring requirements in experimental data modeling; and (3) describing a community software tool kit (STK) that supports application development using FuGE. We anticipate that these guidelines will encourage consistent usage of FuGE, and as such, will contribute to the development of convergent data standards in omics research
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19441879
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  • 2
    ISSN: 0368-2048
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Archives of microbiology 42 (1962), S. 56-63 
    ISSN: 1432-072X
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract The recent algal history of De Klip is outlined and opportunities for collecting soil samples, their nature, the uses of soil cultures both scientific and educational, the longevity of the soil and methods of storing are discussed. The nature of De Klip soil is described and an outline of the procedure followed in making the soil cultures is given. Details of three typical cultures follow with a comparison of the results. Two new species obtained in these cultures are described, Chlamydomonas capensis and ?Pedinopera africana. It is specially fitting that its subject should be cultures of soil from “The Rock” since Professor Pringsheim has shared with me the wonder and joy aroused by the extraordinary fertility of De Klip soil.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 168 (1951), S. 524-524 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] This pretty little alga is most distinctive, bright green, with two pyrenoids placed symmetrically at opposite poles of the protoplast, across the centre of which is a clear, colourless zone ; when grown in a rich nutrient solution, however, the latter is more or less completely obliterated by the ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Hydrobiologia 14 (1959), S. 1-71 
    ISSN: 1573-5117
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary 1. Letterstedtia insignis is essentially a plant of the sub-littoral zone and its fringe; it has been recorded as growing at a number of stations on the east coast of the Cape Province, in quantity at Salt Vlei Bay and Waterloo Bay. 2. Periodic visits to these two localities have been paid during the period April 1958 to January 1959. 3. The alga exhibits a high degree of plasticity resulting in great complexity and variability in external form. 4. Plants in shallow water are typically bushy but may develop straps; fully adult plants may or may not have a bushy base. In deep water they attain considerable size (over 2 $$\tfrac{1}{2}$$ feet) but have never been found reaching the size (4 feet or more) recorded by Areschoug from Natal. 5. Except in the young sporeling the plant is thalloid, flattened throughout, with no distinct stipe. 6. The young parts of the plant show characteristic ulvacean structure but differ from Ulva in that even in the youngest parts the inner walls of the two cell layers are in contact with one another and partially fused. 7. Very early in development differentiation of meristematic and somatic tissue begins to appear. Meristematic cells are thin walled each with a single parietal chloroplast lining the upper part of the cell and two or more pyrenoids, and are found in all marginal regions of fronds, leaflets and frills of the straps. Somatic cells have progressively thickened walls with many small granular chloroplasts and are found in the older parts of fronds and leaflets and the central region of the straps. 8. Growth in thickness is brought about in somatic regions by a two-fold process: — a) formation of rhizoidal outgrowths from the inner end of certain cells and b) deposition of wall substance in the fused inner walls of the two cell layers, resulting in the formation of an elaborate system of cross structs or trabeculae. 9. Growth in thickness may occur in any part of the plant even the extreme apical parts of the straps, usually becoming progressively more extensive towards the base of the frond. It is most apparent externally when it forms midribs in the straps. 10. A similar secretion of wall substance, both internally and externally, soon completely envelops the attachment organ and stipe of the young sporeling. 11. External secretion of the same substance builds up a complex wart-like structure so that the mature holdfast is large and conical in shape, the flattened fronds arising directly from its apex. The outer surface of the wart-like secretions are mucilaginous and become coated with sand particles which eventually impregnate the whole holdfast. 12. Wart like secretions often extend from the holdfast up on to the base of the frond strengthening it while others may form secondary attachment organs on the lower margins of the frond. Gall-like warts also occur on the upper parts of the thallus especially on the straps. 13. Reproduction may occur in any young meristematic part. 14. Reproductive areas are sharply delimited, small marginal arcs in leaflets and young parts of fronds, successive arcs often overlapping, marginal strips in the frill of straps. All the cells of the area except a couple of marginal rows from gametangia. 15. Recently divided cells become modified to form gametangia, the contents of each gametangium dividing into 16 (rarely 32) parts which round off, each containing a parietal chloroplast, a single pyrenoid and conspicuous eyespot. 16. When mature each develops 2 flagella, elongates and starts to move within the gametangium; activity is probably initiated by certain states of the tide. 17. After a short period of movement the 16 gametes escape through a raised pore in the centre of the outer wall. 18. Occasional fusion within the gametangium is regarded as a pathological phenomenon. 19. Liberation takes place more or less simultaneously from all the gametangia in a fertile area after which the colourless evacuated area with a narrow margin of green non-fertile cells is sloughed off. 20. On liberation “clumping” immediately starts, conjugation rapidly follows and the population of swarmers is soon composed mainly of quadriflagellate planozygotes. 21. Planozygotes settle down on any available surface, round off and secrete a wall. 22. This has been seen to take place on fertile fronds particularly on or near evacuated areas. Many of the rounded spores were small with a single eyespot, others larger with two eyespots. The eyespots were comparatively large and conspicuous and persisted for several days. 23. Both types of cells sometimes commenced to germinate, but most of the smaller ones soon degenerated. 24. It was concluded that the swarmers were either gametes or facultative gametes but whether they can continue to develop without conjugation is unknown. As a rule conjugation appears to be general. 25. No sign of the formation of quadriflagellate zoospores has yet been found. 26. Swarmers collected on slides and cover-slips settled down and were kept in culture in filtered sea-water plus a few drops of Schreiber's solution. 27. The spore enlarges, the contents usually becoming granular. 28. Elongation begins, a transverse wall cuts off the lower narrower part from the upper rounded cell; the former develops into an attachment organ, either a rhizoid or a polygonal cell, the latter by successive transverse divisions forms a filament of from 6 to 12 cells. 29. Longitudinal division starts a short way up the filament, extends downwards to the second cell and upwards, the last few cells remaining undivided. The end cell is dome-shaped and functions as an apical cell continuing to cut off segments parallel with its base. 30. From the daughter cells of the second cell rhizoidal processes sometimes grow down to help form the attachment organ. 31. Hyaline wall-substance is secreted round the foot of the basal cell gluing it to the glass. 32. Further divisions in the upper part of the filaments resulted in widening, the filament becoming 4 or 5 cells wide, while longitudinal divisions extended into into the monosiphonous tip and the apical cell itself finally divided longitudinally to form a meristem. 33. Flattening of the thallus was seen in sporelings grown in situ but has only once been obtained in culture; in some cultures various abnormalities appeared, some attributed to too free use of Schreiber's solution. 34. Naturally developing sporelings were found growing on Placophora epiphytic on Codium Duthieae; these provided a check on sporelings raised in culture. 35. Other species of Letterstedtia are compared with L. insignis and their probable affinities discussed. 36. The characters of Letterstedtia insignis are summarized, those considered to be generic enumerated and the conclusion reached that the retention of Letterstedtia as a genus distinct from Ulva is more than justified.
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  • 6
    ISSN: 0009-2614
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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