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  • 1
    Keywords: INTERVENTION ; BREAST-CANCER ; STRESS ; LYMPHOCYTES ; SKELETAL-MUSCLE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; OXIDATIVE DNA-DAMAGE ; alkaline comet assay ; WEIGHT-LOSS
    Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Maintenance of normal weight and higher levels of physical activity are associated with a reduced risk of several types of cancer. As genomic instability is regarded as a hallmark of cancer development, one proposed mechanism is improvement of DNA repair function. We investigated links between dietary weight loss, exercise, and strand break rejoining in an ancillary study to a randomized-controlled trial. METHODS: Overweight/obese postmenopausal women (n=439) were randomized to: a) reduced-calorie weight-loss diet ("diet" n=118); b) moderate-to-vigorous intensity aerobic exercise ("exercise" n=117); c) a combination ("diet+exercise" n=117); or d) control (n=87). The reduced-calorie diet had a 10% weight-loss goal. The exercise intervention consisted of 45 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous aerobic activity 5 days/week for 12 months. DNA repair capacity was measured in a subset of 226 women at baseline and 12 months, from cryopreserved peripheral mononuclear cells using the Comet assay. Anthropometric and body composition measures were performed at baseline and 12 months. RESULTS: DNA repair capacity did not change significantly with any of the 12 month interventions compared to control; there were also no significant changes when stratified by changes in body composition or aerobic fitness (VO2max). At baseline, DNA repair capacity was positively associated with weight, BMI, and fat mass (r=0.20, p=0.003; r=0.19, p=0.004; r=0.13, p=0.04, respectively) and inversely with lean body mass (r=-0.14, p=0.04). CONCLUSION: In conclusion, DNA repair capacity did not change with dietary weight loss or exercise interventions in postmenopausal women within a period of 12 months. Other assays that capture different facets of DNA repair function may be needed.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25160845
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  • 2
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  Mainz//2011; 56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie (gmds), 6. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Epidemiologie (DGEpi); 20110926-20110929; Mainz; DOC11gmds306 /20110920/
    Publication Date: 2011-09-20
    Keywords: SNPs ; polymorphisms ; colorectal cancer ; ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 3
    Keywords: SURVIVAL ; ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH-FACTOR ; DIAGNOSIS ; RISK ; FAMILY ; prevention ; ASPIRIN USE ; FATAL COLON-CANCER ; C-REACTIVE PROTEIN ; COX-2 ; RANDOMIZED-TRIAL ; CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 EXPRESSION ; LARGE-BOWEL CANCER
    Abstract: Objective Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use decreases both the incidence of colorectal cancer and recurrence of adenomas among patients with prior colorectal neoplasia. However, few studies have investigated the association between NSAID use and colorectal cancer-specific survival. The role of prediagnostic NSAID use was therefore examined in relation to colorectal cancer-specific survival among cases from the Seattle Colon Cancer Family Registry (Seattle Colon CFR). Methods This was a follow-up study that included incident cases of colorectal cancer from the Seattle Colon CFR. Cases were aged 20-74, diagnosed from 1997 to 2002, and were identified using the population-based Puget Sound SEER registry. Detailed information on history of NSAID use, including type, recency and duration, was collected through an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Follow-up for mortality was completed through linkages to the National Death Index. The main outcome measure was death due to colorectal cancer after diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to investigate the relationship between prediagnostic NSAID use and colorectal cancer-specific mortality among cases. Results NSAID use prior to colorectal cancer diagnosis was associated with an -20% lower rate of colorectal cancer mortality after diagnosis compared with never use (HR 0.79; 95% CI 0.65 to 0.97). This relationship appeared to be duration dependent, with longer reported use prior to diagnosis associated with lower rates of colorectal cancer mortality among cases. The most pronounced reductions in mortality were observed among cases diagnosed with proximal disease (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.37 to 0.82), whereas no association was observed between NSAID use prior to diagnosis and colorectal cancer-specific mortality among cases diagnosed with distal or rectal disease. Conclusions The findings suggest that regular use of NSAIDs prior to diagnosis is associated with improved colorectal cancer survival, particularly among cases diagnosed with proximal disease and in longer term NSAID users.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21051449
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH-FACTOR ; RISK ; NF-KAPPA-B ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; UP-REGULATION ; COLON-CANCER ; PROGRAMMED CELL-DEATH ; RANDOMIZED-TRIAL ; tumor microenvironment ; PROSTAGLANDIN E-2 ; FALSE DISCOVERY RATE
    Abstract: PURPOSE: Prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with systemic inflammation, and anti-inflammatory drugs can reduce both CRC incidence and mortality. Genetic variation in proinflammatory pathways can affect an individual's CRC risk. However, few studies have investigated the prognostic importance of this genetic variation in CRC patients. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We investigated the association between CRC survival and genetic variation in proinflammatory pathways among patients from the Puget Sound Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results registry. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped in five genes (PTGS-1, PTGS-2, MRP4, NFkappaB, and IkappaBKbeta). Vital status was ascertained through linkage to the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI). The false discovery rate method of Benjamini and Hochberg was applied to address multiple testing. RESULTS: Four PTGS-1 variants were associated with CRC survival. One, G〉A intron 9 (rs1213266), was associated with approximately 50% lower CRC mortality (HR(AA/AG vs. GG) = 0.48; 95% CI, 0.25-0.93). Three variants, including L237M, resulted in significantly elevated CRC mortality risk, with HRs ranging from approximately 1.5 to 2.0. Two variants in IkappaBKbeta, including R526Q, were significantly associated with CRC survival. Correction for multiple testing indicated that variants in both PTGS-1 and IkappaBKbeta are reproducibly associated with CRC survival. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that genetic variation in proinflammatory pathways may be important for CRC prognosis. This investigation represents one of the first descriptions of the relationship between inherited polymorphisms and mortality in CRC patients and provides a starting point for further research. Clin Cancer Res; 17(22); 7139-47. (c)2011 AACR.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21976545
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  • 5
    Keywords: HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) are sexually transmitted and linked to several epithelial malignancies, but an association between HPV and colorectal neoplasia is not established. Previously, we reported a three-fold increase in the odds of colorectal hyperplastic polyps associated with oncogenic HPV seropositivity in men but detected no HPV DNA in colorectal tissues from these same men. METHODS: To test the reproducibility of our prior HPV antibody results and to explore the hypothesis that colorectal hyperplastic polyps may be associated with sexual behavior in men, we conducted a case-control study of hyperplastic polyps and antibodies to eight oncogenic HPV types (including 16 and 18), Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Study participants were men, ages 30-74 years, enrolled in the Minnesota Cancer Prevention Research Unit Polyp Study who had an index colonoscopy from 1991 to 1994, and received a diagnosis of hyperplastic polyps (n = 97) or were polyp-free (n = 184). Plasma was assessed for antibodies to the eight oncogenic HPV types, HSV-2, and HCV using a bead-based multiplex assay. RESULTS: The adjusted ORs for the association between hyperplastic polyps and seropositivity to oncogenic HPV (all eight types combined) was 0.84 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.44-1.58; for HSV-2, OR, 0.98, 95% CI, 0.48-1.99; and for HCV, OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.11-3.26]. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggested no association between colorectal hyperplastic polyps and antibodies to specific sexually transmitted infections (STI) in men. IMPACT: Factors associated with STIs are unlikely to play a role in the etiology of colorectal hyperplastic polyps in men.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22736792
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  • 6
    Abstract: Pancreatic phospholipase A2, product of PLA2G1B, catalyzes the release of fatty acids from dietary phospholipids.Diet is the ultimate source of arachidonic acid in cellular phospholipids, precursor of eicosanoid signaling molecules, linked to inflammation, cell proliferation and colorectal carcinogenesis. We evaluated the association of PLA2G1B tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms with colorectal neoplasia risk. A linkage-disequilibrium-based tagSNP algorithm (r(2)=0.90, MAF〉/=4%) identified three tagSNPs. The SNPs were genotyped on the Illumina platform in three population-based, case-control studies: colon cancer (1424 cases/1780 controls); rectal cancer (583/775); colorectal adenomas (485/578). Evaluating gene-wide associations, principal-component and haplotype analysis were conducted, individual SNPs were evaluated by logistic regression. Two PLA2G1B variants were statistically significantly associated with reduced risk of rectal cancer (rs5637, 3702 G〉A Ser98Ser, p-trend=0.03; rs9657930, 1593 C〉T, p-trend=0.01); principal component analysis showed that genetic variation in the gene overall was statistically significantly associated with rectal cancer (p=0.02). NSAID users with the rs2070873 variant had a reduced rectal cancer risk (P-inter=0.02). Specific associations were observed with tumor subtypes (TP53/KRAS). The results suggest that genetic polymorphisms in PLA2G1B affect susceptibility to rectal cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24046806
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  • 7
    Keywords: PROGRESSION ; FIBER ; COLON-CANCER ; ULCERATIVE-COLITIS ; METAANALYSIS ; RED MEAT ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; susceptibility loci ; ENVIRONMENT INTERACTION ; ASSOCIATION SCAN
    Abstract: Dietary factors, including meat, fruits, vegetables and fiber, are associated with colorectal cancer; however, there is limited information as to whether these dietary factors interact with genetic variants to modify risk of colorectal cancer. We tested interactions between these dietary factors and approximately 2.7 million genetic variants for colorectal cancer risk among 9,287 cases and 9,117 controls from ten studies. We used logistic regression to investigate multiplicative gene-diet interactions, as well as our recently developed Cocktail method that involves a screening step based on marginal associations and gene-diet correlations and a testing step for multiplicative interactions, while correcting for multiple testing using weighted hypothesis testing. Per quartile increment in the intake of red and processed meat were associated with statistically significant increased risks of colorectal cancer and vegetable, fruit and fiber intake with lower risks. From the case-control analysis, we detected a significant interaction between rs4143094 (10p14/near GATA3) and processed meat consumption (OR = 1.17; p = 8.7E-09), which was consistently observed across studies (p heterogeneity = 0.78). The risk of colorectal cancer associated with processed meat was increased among individuals with the rs4143094-TG and -TT genotypes (OR = 1.20 and OR = 1.39, respectively) and null among those with the GG genotype (OR = 1.03). Our results identify a novel gene-diet interaction with processed meat for colorectal cancer, highlighting that diet may modify the effect of genetic variants on disease risk, which may have important implications for prevention.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24743840
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  • 8
    Keywords: DISEASE ; HEALTH ; DESIGN ; COLON-CANCER ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; RISK LOCI ; COMMON SNPS ; HUMAN HEIGHT
    Abstract: A sizable fraction of colorectal cancer (CRC) is expected to be explained by heritable factors, with heritability estimates ranging from 12 to 35% twin and family studies. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified a number of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with CRC risk. Although it has been shown that these CRC susceptibility SNPs only explain a small proportion of the genetic risk, it is not clear how much of the heritability these SNPs explain and how much is left to be detected by other, yet to be identified, common SNPs. Therefore, we estimated the heritability of CRC under different scenarios using Genome-Wide Complex Trait Analysis in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium including 8025 cases and 10 814 controls. We estimated that the heritability explained by known common CRC SNPs identified in GWAS was 0.65% (95% CI:0.3-1%; P = 1.11 x 10-16), whereas the heritability explained by all common SNPs was at least 7.42% (95% CI: 4.71-10.12%; P = 8.13 x 10(-8)), suggesting that many common variants associated with CRC risk remain to be detected. Comparing the heritability explained by the common variants with that from twin and family studies, a fraction of the heritability may be explained by other genetic variants, such as rare variants. In addition, our analysis showed that the gene x smoking interaction explained a significant proportion of the CRC variance (P = 1.26 x 10(-2)). In summary, our results suggest that known CRC SNPs only explain a small proportion of the heritability and more common SNPs have yet to be identified
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24562164
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  • 9
    Keywords: PROSTATE-CANCER ; HUMAN LIVER-MICROSOMES ; NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS ; FALSE DISCOVERY RATE ; UDP-GLUCURONOSYLTRANSFERASE ; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIALS ; 1A6 PHARMACOGENETICS ; ALLELIC VARIANT ; DAILY ASPIRIN ; 2B15 GENE
    Abstract: The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with reduced risk of colorectal neoplasia. Previous studies have reported that polymorphisms in NSAID-metabolizing enzymes central to NSAID metabolism including UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) and cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 may modify this protective effect. We investigated whether 35 functionally relevant polymorphisms within CYP2C9 and UGT genes were associated with colorectal cancer risk or modified the protective effect of NSAIDs on colorectal cancer susceptibility, using 1,584 colorectal cancer cases and 2,516 unaffected sibling controls from the Colon Cancer Family Registry. A three-SNP genotype in UGT1A6 (G-A-A; Ala7-Thr181-Arg184) and the Asp85 variant in UGT2B15 increased the risk of colorectal cancer (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.04-14.45 and OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.10-1.63, respectively). We observed interactions between UGT1A3 Thr78Thr (A〉G) and NSAID use (P-interaction = 0.02), a three-SNP genotype within UGT2B4 and ibuprofen use (P-interaction = 0.0018), as well as UGT2B15 Tyr85Asp (T〉G) and aspirin use (P-interaction = 0.01). The interaction with the UGT2B4 and the UGT2B15 polymorphisms were noteworthy at the 25% FDR level. This study highlights the need for further pharmacogenetic studies to identify individuals who might benefit from NSAID use as part of developing effective strategies for prevention of colorectal neoplasia. (c) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24677636
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  • 10
    Keywords: HEALTH ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; COLON-CANCER ; PREDICTION ; MUTATION CARRIERS ; METAANALYSIS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; TASK-FORCE ; CHROMOSOME 8Q24 ; AMERICAN-COLLEGE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) can be greatly reduced through screening. To aid in the development of screening strategies, we refined models designed to determine risk of CRC by incorporating information from common genetic susceptibility loci. METHODS: By using data collected from more than 12,000 participants in 6 studies performed from 1990 through 2011 in the United States and Germany, we developed risk determination models based on sex, age, family history, genetic risk score (number of risk alleles carried at 27 validated common CRC susceptibility loci), and history of endoscopic examinations. The model was validated using data collected from approximately 1800 participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, conducted from 1993 through 2001 in the United States. RESULTS: We identified a CRC genetic risk score that independently predicted which patients in the training set would develop CRC. Compared with determination of risk based only on family history, adding the genetic risk score increased the discriminatory accuracy from 0.51 to 0.59 (P = .0028) for men and from 0.52 to 0.56 (P = .14) for women. We calculated age-and sex-specific 10-year CRC absolute risk estimates based on the number of risk alleles, family history, and history of endoscopic examinations. A model that included a genetic risk score better determined the recommended starting age for screening in subjects with and without family histories of CRC. The starting age for high-risk men (family history of CRC and genetic risk score, 90%) was 42 years, and for low-risk men (no family history of CRC and genetic risk score, 10%) was 52 years. For men with no family history and a high genetic risk score (90%), the starting age would be 47 years; this is an intermediate value that is 5 years earlier than it would be for men with a genetic risk score of 10%. Similar trends were observed in women. CONCLUSIONS: By incorporating information on CRC risk alleles, we created a model to determine the risk for CRC more accurately. This model might be used to develop screening and prevention strategies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25683114
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