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  • 1
    Unknown
    Oxford : John Wiley-Blackwell
    Call number: A180:7
    Keywords: Septins
    Pages: ix, 370 p., [8] p. of plates
    ISBN: 9780470519691
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  • 2
    Call number: 04-GEN:210/2
    Keywords: Saccharomyces / Cytology ; Fungal molecular biology
    Pages: v.〈 2 〉 : ill.
    ISBN: 087969355X
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  • 3
    Call number: 04-GEN:210/1 ; ATV-MOL:119/1
    Keywords: Saccharomyces / Cytology ; Fungal molecular biology
    Pages: ix, 826 p. : ill.
    ISBN: 0-87969-306-0
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    04-GEN:210/1 departmental collection or stack – please contact the library
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1432-072X
    Keywords: Yeast ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae ; Heat killing ; Membrane damage ; Genetic damage ; Growth temperature
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract The resistance of exponentially growing yeast cells to killing by exposure to 52°C increased markedly as the growth temperature was increased. Identical killing curves were obtained for cells suspended in growth medium or in 0.9% saline. Cells resistant to killing at 52°C were quite sensitive to killing at slightly higher temperatures. These results suggest a primary role for membrane damage in the mechanism of heat killing.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1617-4623
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary An enrichment procedure that exploits the difference in heat-sensitivity between exponentially growing and stationary phase cells has been developed for the isolation of yeast mutants. Enrichments of up to 12-fold for temperature-sensitive lethal mutants and of up to 15-fold for auxotrophs have been obtained with single cycles of selection. Still higher enrichments (to frequencies of greater than 90% and 80% for temperature-sensitive lethals and auxotrophs, respectively) have been obtained with multiple cycles of selection. The method requires no special parent strain, and seems adaptable to the selection of a wide variety of types of mutants.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1617-4623
    Keywords: Prenylation ; Geranylgeranyl transferase I ; CAL1 ; CDC43
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract The geneCAL1 (also known asCDC43) ofSaccharomyces cerevisiae encodes theβ subunit of geranylgeranyl transferase I (GGTase I), which modifies several small GTPases. Biochemical analyses of the mutant enzymes encoded bycall-1, andcdc43-2 tocdc43-7, expressed in bacteria, have shown that all of the mutant enzymes possess reduced activity, and that none shows temperature-sensitive enzymatic activities. Nonetheless, all of thecall/cdc43 mutants show temperature-sensitive growth phenotypes. Increase in soluble pools of the small GTPases was observed in the yeast mutant cells at the restrictive temperature in vivo, suggesting that the yeast prenylation pathway itself is temperature sensitive. Thecall-1 mutation, located most proximal to the C-terminus of the protein, differs from the othercdc43 mutations in several respects. An increase in soluble Rholp was observed in thecall-1 strain grown at the restrictive temperature. The temperature-sensitive phenotype ofcall-1 is most efficiently suppressed by overproduction of Rholp. Overproduction of the other essential target, Cdc42p, in contrast, is deleterious incall-1 cells, but not in othercdc43 mutants or the wild-type strains. Thecdc43-5 mutant cells accumulate Cdc42p in soluble pools andcdc43-5 is suppressed by overproduction of Cdc42p. Thus, several phenotypic differences are observed among thecall/cdc43 mutations, possibly due to alterations in substrate specificity caused by the mutations.
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1617-4623
    Keywords: Key words Prenylation ; Geranylgeranyl transferase I ; CAL1 ; CDC43
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract The gene CAL1 (also known as CDC43) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the β subunit of geranylgeranyl transferase I (GGTase I), which modifies several small GTPases. Biochemical analyses of the mutant-enzymes encoded by cal1, and cdc43-2 to cdc43-7, expressed in bacteria, have hown that all of the mutant enzymes possess reduced activity, and that none shows temerature-sensitive enzymatic activities. Nonetheless, all of the cal1/cdc43 mutants show temperature-sensitive growth phenotypes. Increase in soluble pools of the small GTPases was observed in the yeast mutant cells at the restrictive temperature in vivo, suggesting that the yeast prenylation pathway itself is temperative sensitive. The cal-1 mutation, located most proximal to the C-terminus of the protein, differs from the other cdc43 mutations in several respects. An increase in soluble Rholp was observed in the cal-1 strain grown at the restrictive temperature. The temperature-sensitive phenotype of cal-1 is most efficiently suppressed by overproduction of Rholp. Overproduction of the other essential target, Cdc42p, in contrast, is deleterious in cal-1 cells, but not in other cdc43 mutants or the wild-type strains. The cdc43-5 mutant cells accumulate Cdc42p in soluble pools and cdc43-5 is suppressed by overproduction of Cdc42p. Thus, several phenotypic differences are observed among the cal1/cdc43 mutations, possibly due to alterations in substrate specificity caused by the mutations.
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] In order to determine whether the role of Cdc24/Cdc42 in mating is limited to morphogenetic functions, we determined the integrity of other aspects of the mating-pheromone response in cdc24 and cdc42 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants. Induction of pheromone-responsive genes such as FUS1 ...
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  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    New York, NY [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
    Yeast 8 (1992), S. 315-323 
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: Saccharomyces cerevisiae ; cell cycle ; bud emergence ; chromosome VII ; recombination frequency ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: MSB2 was identified previously as a multicopy suppressor of a temerature-sensitive mutation in CDC24, a gene required for polarity establishment and bud formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The inferred MSB2 product contains 1306 amino acids, 42% of which are Ser or Thr. Its Ser+Thr-richnes and hydrophobicity profile suggest that Msb2p may be an integral membrane protein containing a long, periplasmic, N-terminal domain and a short, cytoplasmic, C-terminal domain. Cells that lack MSB2 display no obvious mutant phenotypes. MSB2 is located between the centromere and KSS1 on the right arm of chromosome VII. Although physical mapping suggests that MSB2 and LEU1 (on the left arm of chromosome VII) are approximately 40 kb apart, the genetic map distance observed between leul and msb2 :: URA3 marker was only 2.3 cM.
    Additional Material: 4 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 0749-503X
    Keywords: fission yeast ; gene deletions ; gene truncations ; overexpression studies ; epitope tagging ; polymerase chain reaction ; gene expression ; green fluorescent protein ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Genetics
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: We describe a straightforward PCR-based approach to the deletion, tagging, and overexpression of genes in their normal chromosomal locations in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Using this approach and the S. pombe ura4+ gene as a marker, nine genes were deleted with efficiencies of homologous integration ranging from 6 to 63%. We also constructed a series of plasmids containing the kanMX6 module, which allows selection of G418-resistant cells and thus provides a new heterologous marker for use in S. pombe. The modular nature of these constructs allows a small number of PCR primers to be used for a wide variety of gene manipulations, including deletion, overexpression (using the regulatable nmt1 promoter), C- or N-terminal protein tagging (with HA, Myc, GST, or GFP), and partial C- or N-terminal deletions with or without tagging. Nine genes were manipulated using these kanMX6 constructs as templates for PCR. The PCR primers included 60 to 80 bp of flanking sequences homologous to target sequences in the genome. Transformants were screened for homologous integration by PCR. In most cases, the efficiency of homologous integration was ≥50%, and the lowest efficiency encountered was 17%. The methodology and constructs described here should greatly facilitate analysis of gene function in S. pombe. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Additional Material: 2 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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