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  • 1
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    German Medical Science; Düsseldorf, Köln
    In:  55. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e.V. (DGNC), 1. Joint Meeting mit der Ungarischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie; 20040425-20040428; Köln; DOCMO.08.04 /20040423/
    Publication Date: 2004-04-22
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 2
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  62. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC), Joint Meeting mit der Polnischen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgen (PNCH); 20110507-20110511; Hamburg; DOCP 096 /20110428/
    Publication Date: 2011-04-28
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 3
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  60. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie (DGNC), Joint Meeting mit den Benelux-Ländern und Bulgarien; 20090524-20090527; Münster; DOCP07-07 /20090520/
    Publication Date: 2009-06-30
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 4
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    German Medical Science; Düsseldorf, Köln
    In:  56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e.V. (DGNC), 3èmes journées françaises de Neurochirurgie (SFNC); 20050507-20050511; Strasbourg; DOCP019 /20050504/
    Publication Date: 2005-05-05
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
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  • 5
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    German Medical Science; Düsseldorf, Köln
    In:  56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Neurochirurgie e.V. (DGNC), 3èmes journées françaises de Neurochirurgie (SFNC); 20050507-20050511; Strasbourg; DOC11.05.-10.05 /20050504/
    Publication Date: 2005-05-05
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1618-2650
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Notes: Summary A new method is introduced for packing micro-columns with an ID (inner diameter) of 320 μm. The advantage of this method is the extraordinary economy of the packing material employed and the high reliability in production. The theoretical plate height ranges from 7 to 8 μm for 3 μm particles.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1432-1106
    Keywords: Key words Vision ; Locomotion ; Optic Flow Adaptation ; Human
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract  The effect of an optic flow pattern on human locomotion was studied in subjects walking on a self-driven treadmill. During walking an optic flow pattern was presented, which gave subjects the illusion of walking in a tunnel. Visual stimulation was achieved by a closed-loop system in which optic flow and treadmill velocity were automatically adjusted to the intended walking velocity (WV). Subjects were instructed to keep their WV constant. The presented optic flow velocity was sinusoidally varied relative to the WV with a cycle period of 2 min. The independent variable was the relative optic flow (rOF), ranging from −1, i.e., forward flow of equal velocity as the WV, and 3, i.e., backward flow 3 times faster than WV. All subjects were affected by rOF in a similar way. The results showed, firstly, an increase in stride-cycle variability that suggests a larger instability of the walking pattern than in treadmill walking without optic flow; and, secondly, a significant modulating effect of rOF on the self-chosen WV. Backward flow resulted in a decrease, whereas forward flow induced an increase of WV. Within the analyzed range, a linear relationship was found between rOF and WV. Thirdly, WV-related modulations in stride length (SL) and stride frequency (SF) were different from normal walking: whereas in the latter a change in WV is characterized by a stable linear relationship between SL and SF (i.e., an approximately constant SL to SF ratio), optic flow-induced changes in WV are closely related to a modulation of SL (i.e., a change of SL-SF ratio). Fourthly, this effect of rOF diminished by about 45% over the entire walking distance of 800 m. The results suggest that the adjustment of WV is the result of a summation of visual and leg-proprioceptive velocity informations. Visual information about ego-motion leads to an unintentional modulation of WV by affecting specifically the relationship between SL and SF. It is hypothesized that the space-related parameter (SL) is influenced by visually perceived motion information, whereas the temporal parameter (SF) remains stable. The adaptation over the entire walking distance suggests that a shift from visual to leg-proprioceptive control takes place.
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  • 8
    ISSN: 0021-9673
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1432-1106
    Keywords: Gait ; Sural nerve ; Sensory gating ; Somatosensory evoked potential ; Human
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract To investigate how gait influences the perceived intensity of cutaneous input from the skin of the foot, the tibial or sural nerves were stimulated at the ankle during walking or running on a treadmill. As compared to standing, the detection threshold for these stimuli was raised by more than 30% during the locomotion tasks. During walking, there was a phase-dependent modulation in perceived intensity of suprathreshold stimuli (1.5, 2, or 2.5×PT). Stimuli given just prior to footfall were perceived as significantly above average (Wilcoxon signed-rank test). In contrast there was a significant phasic decrease in sensitivity for shocks delivered immediately after ipsi- and contralateral footfall. The amplitude of somatosensory evoked potentials (P50–N80 complex), simultaneously evoked from pulse trains to the sural nerve and recorded at scalp level, was, on average, 62% of the level during standing. During gait, the amplitude of this complex was significantly smaller just after footfall than the amplitude during late swing (MANOVA). It is suggested that the reduced sensation and the decreased evoked potentials after touchdown may be due to occlusion or masking by concomitant afferent input from the feet. On the other hand, the phasic increase in sensitivity at the end of swing is thought to result from a centrally generated facilitation of sensory transmission of signals in anticipation of foot-placing.
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1432-1106
    Keywords: Key words Split-belt locomotion ; Afferent input ; Body loading ; Locomotor adaptation ; Human gait
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract  The modification of the normal locomotor pattern of humans was investigated using a split-belt locomotion protocol (treadmill belt speeds of 4.5 km/h and 1.5 km/h for the right and left legs, respectively) and also by changing afferent input from the legs (30% reduction or increase in body weight by suspending subjects in a parachute harness or by wearing a lead-filled vest). After a control-speed training period (10 min) of symmetrical walking (3 km/h each leg) and a period (10 min) of split-belt walking, the adjustment back to the control speed resulted in a mean speed difference between the right leg and the left leg of 0.85 km/h. Adjustment of belt speed on either side was performed by the hands using a potentiometer. For comparison, also speed adjustment by the feet via feedback derived from changes in the treadmill drive current was studied. No significant difference was obtained when both modes of adjustment were compared. Body unloading or loading during the training period resulted in an improved adjustment of treadmill belt speed. This suggests that load receptor information plays a major role in the programming of a new walking pattern.
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