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  • 1
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    Oxford : Academic Press
    Call number: SF77:145
    Keywords: Mice / Nervous system
    Pages: xvii, 795 p. : ill.
    ISBN: 9780123694973
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  • 2
    Keywords: GENES ; PATTERNS ; SPECIFICATION ; ORGANIZATION ; FOREBRAIN ; HEDGEHOG ; ZEBRAFISH ; NEURAL-TUBE ; PROSOMERIC MODEL ; MOUSE HYPOTHALAMUS
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26157363
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1432-0568
    Keywords: Chemoarchitectony ; Acetylcholinesterase ; Nucleus rotundus ; Thalamus ; Tectothalamic pathway
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary Histochemical mapping of AChE activity in the chick diencephalon shows differential staining of several subregions witin the nucleus rotundus. The topography and extent of these subdivisions were studied in transverse, horizontal and sagittal sections. A correlation with rotundic hodologic subdivisions reported in the literature is feasible, whereas several other chemoarchitectonic or functional markers show a homogeneous distribution throughout the n. rotundus. Moreover, cholinergic markers do not detect cholinergic afferents within the rotundic neuropile. Late embryonic appearance of the AChE heterogeneity suggests a modulation of neuropile AChE levels subsequent to synaptogenetic adjustment of differential hodology.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1432-0568
    Keywords: Neurogenesis ; Development ; Diencephalon ; Thalamus ; Visual system
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary The cytoarchitectonic development of n. superficialis magnocellularis (dorsal thalamus, posterior parencephalon) was studied from 3 days of incubation up to the mature state after hatching in the chick. A hypothesis of Kuhlenbeck (1937) on a partial transformation or contribution of SM cells into a different neighbouring griseum was tested, in the wider context of divergent interpretations of diencephalic development either within Herrick's (1910) longitudinal columnar theory, or within a modified neuromeric conception (Puelles et al. 1987a). Nucleus SM develops early within the alar region of the posterior parencephalon, forming an outer mantle stratum over the main telencephalopetal thalamic inner cell mass. Thymidine-labeling data pin-point its generation period mainly between 3 and 4.5 days of incubation. Throughout its subsequent development, SM remains within the primary interneuromeric limits that separate it from ventral thalamus and pretectum. After 8 days of incubation, SM subdivides into superficial (compact) and deep (disperse) sublaminae. The superficial one becomes much compressed between n. geniculatus ventralis and n. synencephali superficialis. Some of its cells migrate interstitially into the optic tract (12–16 days in ovo) and later disappear. The corresponding mature remnant was called n. interstitialis tractus opticus (ITO). The deep sublamina of SM forms a cap around n. rotundus. It becomes increasingly dispersed due to many passing fibers, and may be recognized in the mature brain as an area perirotundica (ApR). Clarification of the fate of embryonic SM bears on the confused terminology for various visual diencephalic nuclei. It is argued that the terms n. geniculatus dorsalis p. principalis and p. intercalaris, n. superficialis magnocellularis (in its wrong usage), n. lamminaris precommissuralis, n. lentiformis mesencephali p. medialis, p. parvocellularis and p. magnocellularis should be considered obsolete, on various embryological and hodologic grounds. An embryologically consistent terminology is proposed.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1432-0568
    Keywords: Thalamus ; Comparative anatomy ; Retinal projection ; Tectum, afferents ; Development
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary In a companion paper (Puelles et al., this issue), the cytoarchitectonic development of the thalamic primordium called nucleus superficialis magnocellularis (SM) and its adult configuration in the chick were studied, correcting the misinterpretations that have impeded proper study of this neuronal group. Given its superficial position in the diencephalon, in contact with the optic tract and neighbouring retinorecipient grisea (SS, GV), as well as with the tecto-recipient n. rotundus, SM was suspected to have connections with centers of the visual pathway. In this paper we report the existence of a non-topographic retinal projection over the superficial adult derivate of SM (n. interstitialis tractus opticus, ITO) and a non-topographic, diffuse projection of the whole SM-derived population (area perirotundica, ApR, and ITO) onto the optic tectum. The latter was demonstrated throughout the late embryonic period in which SM loses its embryonic unitary character and becomes dispersed into its ill-defined, definitive adult portions (ITO, ApR). Golgi-like HRP- or DiI-labeling of SM cells showed a protracted immature appearance of their dendrites, expressed coincidently with a capacity to translocate superficially into the optic tract.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    ISSN: 0362-2525
    Keywords: Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: The development of the morphologic features of neurons in the anterior dorsal ventricular ridge (ADVR) has been followed in Golgi preparations from the lizard Gallotia galloti between embryonic stage 32 and post-eclosion stages of specimens 3.6-4.5 cm in length. The differentiation sequence of multipolar and bitufted neurons was established. Dendritic growth cones are present after stage 34. Filiform dendritic processes are replaced later on by spines. Clusters of neurons first appear at stage 39 in the periventricular zone, the cells becoming Golgi-impregnated in pairs. After hatching, the number of impregnated cells per cluster increases.
    Additional Material: 9 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    ISSN: 0362-2525
    Keywords: Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Using Golgi techniques we have studied neuronal cell types in the anterior dorsal ventricular ridge (ADVR) of the adult lizard Gallotia galloti. Multipolar, bitufted, and juxtaependymal neuronal forms were found. The multipolar and bitufted neurons are present in both the periventricular and central ADVR zones. Multipolar neurons can be subdivided into multipolar neurons with polygonal somata and four to six main dendritic trunks and multipolar neurons with pyramidal somata and three or more dendritic trunks. The former are the cells most frequently impregnated in the ADVR. In the population of bitufted neurons, we distinguish subtypes I, II, and III according to the number of dendritic trunks that emerge from the somata. Juxtaependymal neurons are restricted to a cell-poor zone, adjacent to ependymal cells. Their dendrites either are orientated parallel to the ventricular surface or extend into the periventricular zone. The dendrites of ADVR neurons have pedunculated spines with knob-like tips. However, such spines do not appear on the somata or on the primary dendritic trunks. The number of spines is scarce or moderate. The periventricular neuronal clusters contain two to five cells. The morphology of these neurons is mainly multipolar, but we also found some bitufted neurons.
    Additional Material: 4 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 0362-2525
    Keywords: Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: The rostral end of the forebrain was classically defined on the basis of descriptive data. Different assumptions on the mode of closure of the rostral neuropore caused three different theories of the rostral end of the forebrain to be formulated (His 1893a; von Kupffer, '06; Johnston, '09). Some recent descriptive and experimental data have put these theories into question.A piece of black nylon thread was inserted through the rostral neuropore of chick embryos and was fixed to its ventral lip. These operations were done at all intermediate stages during the process of closure of the rostral neuropore. The embryos were sacrificed at a later stage, by which time the neuropore had disappeared.In the cleared specimens the threads always lay at the same site, namely the upper border of lamina terminalis, irrespective of the stage at which the marker was inserted. These results stand against His's conception ((1893a, b) of a sutura terminalis and support the single mechanism of sutura dorsalis during closure of the rostral neuropore. The marking data therefore imply that the topologic rostral end of the forebrain lies at the upper limit of lamina terminalis, as proposed by von Kupffer, '06).
    Additional Material: 7 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1438-2199
    Keywords: Monosodium glutamate ; Convulsion ; Hyperthermia ; Developing brain
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary Treatment of developing rats with monosodium glutamate (MSG) produces an increase of glutamate levels in the brain, being this elevation dependent on both route of administration and animal's age. The capacity of exogenous MSG to induce convulsions seems to be related to the rate of glutamate elevation in the brain, rather than to the absolute value of glutamate concentration reached. Short exposure of MSG-treated rats to moderate hyperthermia potentiated the convulsive incidence and extended the brain damage to areas not affected by treatment with MSG alone, suggesting that the synergic effect of hyperthermia on glutamate neurotoxicity may be related to an increase in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the hyperthermic developing rats.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 0012-1606
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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