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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; TUMORS ; NERVOUS-SYSTEM ; ADULT ; MOUSE MODELS ; PEDIATRIC MEDULLOBLASTOMA ; HEDGEHOG PATHWAY INHIBITOR ; TERT PROMOTER MUTATIONS ; ITRACONAZOLE
    Abstract: Smoothened (SMO) inhibitors recently entered clinical trials for sonic-hedgehog-driven medulloblastoma (SHH-MB). Clinical response is highly variable. To understand the mechanism(s) of primary resistance and identify pathways cooperating with aberrant SHH signaling, we sequenced and profiled a large cohort of SHH-MBs (n = 133). SHH pathway mutations involved PTCH1 (across all age groups), SUFU (infants, including germline), and SMO (adults). Children 〉3 years old harbored an excess of downstream MYCN and GLI2 amplifications and frequent TP53 mutations, often in the germline, all of which were rare in infants and adults. Functional assays in different SHH-MB xenograft models demonstrated that SHH-MBs harboring a PTCH1 mutation were responsive to SMO inhibition, whereas tumors harboring an SUFU mutation or MYCN amplification were primarily resistant.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24651015
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-06-23
    Description: Breast carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide, with an estimated 1.38 million new cases and 458,000 deaths in 2008 alone. This malignancy represents a heterogeneous group of tumours with characteristic molecular features, prognosis and responses to available therapy. Recurrent somatic alterations in breast cancer have been described, including mutations and copy number alterations, notably ERBB2 amplifications, the first successful therapy target defined by a genomic aberration. Previous DNA sequencing studies of breast cancer genomes have revealed additional candidate mutations and gene rearrangements. Here we report the whole-exome sequences of DNA from 103 human breast cancers of diverse subtypes from patients in Mexico and Vietnam compared to matched-normal DNA, together with whole-genome sequences of 22 breast cancer/normal pairs. Beyond confirming recurrent somatic mutations in PIK3CA, TP53, AKT1, GATA3 and MAP3K1, we discovered recurrent mutations in the CBFB transcription factor gene and deletions of its partner RUNX1. Furthermore, we have identified a recurrent MAGI3-AKT3 fusion enriched in triple-negative breast cancer lacking oestrogen and progesterone receptors and ERBB2 expression. The MAGI3-AKT3 fusion leads to constitutive activation of AKT kinase, which is abolished by treatment with an ATP-competitive AKT small-molecule inhibitor.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4148686/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4148686/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Banerji, Shantanu -- Cibulskis, Kristian -- Rangel-Escareno, Claudia -- Brown, Kristin K -- Carter, Scott L -- Frederick, Abbie M -- Lawrence, Michael S -- Sivachenko, Andrey Y -- Sougnez, Carrie -- Zou, Lihua -- Cortes, Maria L -- Fernandez-Lopez, Juan C -- Peng, Shouyong -- Ardlie, Kristin G -- Auclair, Daniel -- Bautista-Pina, Veronica -- Duke, Fujiko -- Francis, Joshua -- Jung, Joonil -- Maffuz-Aziz, Antonio -- Onofrio, Robert C -- Parkin, Melissa -- Pho, Nam H -- Quintanar-Jurado, Valeria -- Ramos, Alex H -- Rebollar-Vega, Rosa -- Rodriguez-Cuevas, Sergio -- Romero-Cordoba, Sandra L -- Schumacher, Steven E -- Stransky, Nicolas -- Thompson, Kristin M -- Uribe-Figueroa, Laura -- Baselga, Jose -- Beroukhim, Rameen -- Polyak, Kornelia -- Sgroi, Dennis C -- Richardson, Andrea L -- Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo -- Lander, Eric S -- Gabriel, Stacey B -- Garraway, Levi A -- Golub, Todd R -- Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge -- Toker, Alex -- Getz, Gad -- Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo -- Meyerson, Matthew -- CA089393/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA122099/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA122099/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jun 20;486(7403):405-9. doi: 10.1038/nature11154.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22722202" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Algorithms ; Breast Neoplasms/*classification/*genetics/pathology ; Core Binding Factor Alpha 2 Subunit/genetics ; Core Binding Factor beta Subunit/genetics ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Exome/genetics ; Female ; Gene Fusion/genetics ; Humans ; Membrane Proteins/genetics ; Mexico ; Mutation/*genetics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/antagonists & inhibitors/genetics/metabolism ; Translocation, Genetic/*genetics ; Vietnam
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-07-20
    Description: Genotypic differences greatly influence susceptibility and resistance to disease. Understanding genotype-phenotype relationships requires that phenotypes be viewed as manifestations of network properties, rather than simply as the result of individual genomic variations. Genome sequencing efforts have identified numerous germline mutations, and large numbers of somatic genomic alterations, associated with a predisposition to cancer. However, it remains difficult to distinguish background, or 'passenger', cancer mutations from causal, or 'driver', mutations in these data sets. Human viruses intrinsically depend on their host cell during the course of infection and can elicit pathological phenotypes similar to those arising from mutations. Here we test the hypothesis that genomic variations and tumour viruses may cause cancer through related mechanisms, by systematically examining host interactome and transcriptome network perturbations caused by DNA tumour virus proteins. The resulting integrated viral perturbation data reflects rewiring of the host cell networks, and highlights pathways, such as Notch signalling and apoptosis, that go awry in cancer. We show that systematic analyses of host targets of viral proteins can identify cancer genes with a success rate on a par with their identification through functional genomics and large-scale cataloguing of tumour mutations. Together, these complementary approaches increase the specificity of cancer gene identification. Combining systems-level studies of pathogen-encoded gene products with genomic approaches will facilitate the prioritization of cancer-causing driver genes to advance the understanding of the genetic basis of human cancer.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408847/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3408847/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit -- Deo, Rahul C -- Padi, Megha -- Adelmant, Guillaume -- Calderwood, Michael A -- Rolland, Thomas -- Grace, Miranda -- Dricot, Amelie -- Askenazi, Manor -- Tavares, Maria -- Pevzner, Samuel J -- Abderazzaq, Fieda -- Byrdsong, Danielle -- Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra -- Chen, Alyce A -- Cheng, Jingwei -- Correll, Mick -- Duarte, Melissa -- Fan, Changyu -- Feltkamp, Mariet C -- Ficarro, Scott B -- Franchi, Rachel -- Garg, Brijesh K -- Gulbahce, Natali -- Hao, Tong -- Holthaus, Amy M -- James, Robert -- Korkhin, Anna -- Litovchick, Larisa -- Mar, Jessica C -- Pak, Theodore R -- Rabello, Sabrina -- Rubio, Renee -- Shen, Yun -- Singh, Saurav -- Spangle, Jennifer M -- Tasan, Murat -- Wanamaker, Shelly -- Webber, James T -- Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer -- Johannsen, Eric -- Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo -- Beroukhim, Rameen -- Kieff, Elliott -- Cusick, Michael E -- Hill, David E -- Munger, Karl -- Marto, Jarrod A -- Quackenbush, John -- Roth, Frederick P -- DeCaprio, James A -- Vidal, Marc -- F32 GM095284/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- F32GM095284/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- K08 CA122833/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- K08 HL098361/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K08HL098361/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- K25 HG006031/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- K25HG006031/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA050661/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01CA050661/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 HG004233/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P50HG004233/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA047006/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA063113/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA066980/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA081135/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA085180/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA093804/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA131354/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG001715/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA047006/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA063113/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA066980/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA081135/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA085180/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA093804/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01CA131354/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01HG001715/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- T32 HL007208/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- T32HL007208/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- U01 CA141583/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01CA141583/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jul 26;487(7408):491-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11288.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Genomic Analysis of Network Perturbations Center of Excellence in Genomic Science, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22810586" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenoviridae/genetics/metabolism/pathogenicity ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Genes, Neoplasm/*genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Herpesvirus 4, Human/genetics/metabolism/pathogenicity ; *Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics ; Humans ; Neoplasms/*genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Oncogenic Viruses/genetics/metabolism/*pathogenicity ; Open Reading Frames/genetics ; Papillomaviridae/genetics/metabolism/pathogenicity ; Polyomavirus/genetics/metabolism/pathogenicity ; Receptors, Notch/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Two-Hybrid System Techniques ; Viral Proteins/genetics/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2012-07-27
    Description: Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant paediatric brain tumour, is currently treated with nonspecific cytotoxic therapies including surgery, whole-brain radiation, and aggressive chemotherapy. As medulloblastoma exhibits marked intertumoural heterogeneity, with at least four distinct molecular variants, previous attempts to identify targets for therapy have been underpowered because of small samples sizes. Here we report somatic copy number aberrations (SCNAs) in 1,087 unique medulloblastomas. SCNAs are common in medulloblastoma, and are predominantly subgroup-enriched. The most common region of focal copy number gain is a tandem duplication of SNCAIP, a gene associated with Parkinson's disease, which is exquisitely restricted to Group 4alpha. Recurrent translocations of PVT1, including PVT1-MYC and PVT1-NDRG1, that arise through chromothripsis are restricted to Group 3. Numerous targetable SCNAs, including recurrent events targeting TGF-beta signalling in Group 3, and NF-kappaB signalling in Group 4, suggest future avenues for rational, targeted therapy.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3683624/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3683624/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Northcott, Paul A -- Shih, David J H -- Peacock, John -- Garzia, Livia -- Morrissy, A Sorana -- Zichner, Thomas -- Stutz, Adrian M -- Korshunov, Andrey -- Reimand, Juri -- Schumacher, Steven E -- Beroukhim, Rameen -- Ellison, David W -- Marshall, Christian R -- Lionel, Anath C -- Mack, Stephen -- Dubuc, Adrian -- Yao, Yuan -- Ramaswamy, Vijay -- Luu, Betty -- Rolider, Adi -- Cavalli, Florence M G -- Wang, Xin -- Remke, Marc -- Wu, Xiaochong -- Chiu, Readman Y B -- Chu, Andy -- Chuah, Eric -- Corbett, Richard D -- Hoad, Gemma R -- Jackman, Shaun D -- Li, Yisu -- Lo, Allan -- Mungall, Karen L -- Nip, Ka Ming -- Qian, Jenny Q -- Raymond, Anthony G J -- Thiessen, Nina T -- Varhol, Richard J -- Birol, Inanc -- Moore, Richard A -- Mungall, Andrew J -- Holt, Robert -- Kawauchi, Daisuke -- Roussel, Martine F -- Kool, Marcel -- Jones, David T W -- Witt, Hendrick -- Fernandez-L, Africa -- Kenney, Anna M -- Wechsler-Reya, Robert J -- Dirks, Peter -- Aviv, Tzvi -- Grajkowska, Wieslawa A -- Perek-Polnik, Marta -- Haberler, Christine C -- Delattre, Olivier -- Reynaud, Stephanie S -- Doz, Francois F -- Pernet-Fattet, Sarah S -- Cho, Byung-Kyu -- Kim, Seung-Ki -- Wang, Kyu-Chang -- Scheurlen, Wolfram -- Eberhart, Charles G -- Fevre-Montange, Michelle -- Jouvet, Anne -- Pollack, Ian F -- Fan, Xing -- Muraszko, Karin M -- Gillespie, G Yancey -- Di Rocco, Concezio -- Massimi, Luca -- Michiels, Erna M C -- Kloosterhof, Nanne K -- French, Pim J -- Kros, Johan M -- Olson, James M -- Ellenbogen, Richard G -- Zitterbart, Karel -- Kren, Leos -- Thompson, Reid C -- Cooper, Michael K -- Lach, Boleslaw -- McLendon, Roger E -- Bigner, Darell D -- Fontebasso, Adam -- Albrecht, Steffen -- Jabado, Nada -- Lindsey, Janet C -- Bailey, Simon -- Gupta, Nalin -- Weiss, William A -- Bognar, Laszlo -- Klekner, Almos -- Van Meter, Timothy E -- Kumabe, Toshihiro -- Tominaga, Teiji -- Elbabaa, Samer K -- Leonard, Jeffrey R -- Rubin, Joshua B -- Liau, Linda M -- Van Meir, Erwin G -- Fouladi, Maryam -- Nakamura, Hideo -- Cinalli, Giuseppe -- Garami, Miklos -- Hauser, Peter -- Saad, Ali G -- Iolascon, Achille -- Jung, Shin -- Carlotti, Carlos G -- Vibhakar, Rajeev -- Ra, Young Shin -- Robinson, Shenandoah -- Zollo, Massimo -- Faria, Claudia C -- Chan, Jennifer A -- Levy, Michael L -- Sorensen, Poul H B -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Pomeroy, Scott L -- Cho, Yoon-Jae -- Bader, Gary D -- Tabori, Uri -- Hawkins, Cynthia E -- Bouffet, Eric -- Scherer, Stephen W -- Rutka, James T -- Malkin, David -- Clifford, Steven C -- Jones, Steven J M -- Korbel, Jan O -- Pfister, Stefan M -- Marra, Marco A -- Taylor, Michael D -- AT1-112286/Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- CA116804/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA138292/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA159859/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA86335/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- K08 NS059790/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P20 CA151129/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA138292/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 HD018655/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103504/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA086335/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA109467/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA114567/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA116804/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA148621/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA155360/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA159859/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA163737/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS061070/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 2;488(7409):49-56. doi: 10.1038/nature11327.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Developmental & Stem Cell Biology Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22832581" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Carrier Proteins/genetics ; Cerebellar Neoplasms/*classification/*genetics/metabolism ; Child ; DNA Copy Number Variations/genetics ; Gene Duplication/genetics ; Genes, myc/genetics ; Genome, Human/*genetics ; Genomic Structural Variation/*genetics ; Genomics ; Hedgehog Proteins/metabolism ; Humans ; Medulloblastoma/*classification/*genetics/metabolism ; NF-kappa B/metabolism ; Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics ; Oncogene Proteins, Fusion/genetics ; Proteins/genetics ; RNA, Long Noncoding ; Signal Transduction ; Transforming Growth Factor beta/metabolism ; Translocation, Genetic/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2012-05-26
    Description: Tumors exhibit numerous recurrent hemizygous focal deletions that contain no known tumor suppressors and are poorly understood. To investigate whether these regions contribute to tumorigenesis, we searched genetically for genes with cancer-relevant properties within these hemizygous deletions. We identified STOP and GO genes, which negatively and positively regulate proliferation, respectively. STOP genes include many known tumor suppressors, whereas GO genes are enriched for essential genes. Analysis of their chromosomal distribution revealed that recurring deletions preferentially overrepresent STOP genes and underrepresent GO genes. We propose a hypothesis called the cancer gene island model, whereby gene islands encompassing high densities of STOP genes and low densities of GO genes are hemizygously deleted to maximize proliferative fitness through cumulative haploinsufficiencies. Because hundreds to thousands of genes are hemizygously deleted per tumor, this mechanism may help to drive tumorigenesis across many cancer types.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4027969/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4027969/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Solimini, Nicole L -- Xu, Qikai -- Mermel, Craig H -- Liang, Anthony C -- Schlabach, Michael R -- Luo, Ji -- Burrows, Anna E -- Anselmo, Anthony N -- Bredemeyer, Andrea L -- Li, Mamie Z -- Beroukhim, Rameen -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Elledge, Stephen J -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32GM07753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54CA143798/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jul 6;337(6090):104-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1219580. Epub 2012 May 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Genetics, Harvard University Medical School, and Division of Genetics, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22628553" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cell Line ; Cell Line, Tumor ; *Cell Proliferation ; *Cell Transformation, Neoplastic ; Chromosome Mapping ; Genes, Essential ; *Genes, Neoplasm ; Genes, Recessive ; Genes, Tumor Suppressor ; *Haploinsufficiency ; Hemizygote ; Humans ; Models, Genetic ; Neoplasms/*genetics/*pathology ; Oncogenes ; *Sequence Deletion
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2011-03-25
    Description: The most common mutation in human melanoma, BRAF(V600E), activates the serine/threonine kinase BRAF and causes excessive activity in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. BRAF(V600E) mutations are also present in benign melanocytic naevi, highlighting the importance of additional genetic alterations in the genesis of malignant tumours. Such changes include recurrent copy number variations that result in the amplification of oncogenes. For certain amplifications, the large number of genes in the interval has precluded an understanding of the cooperating oncogenic events. Here we have used a zebrafish melanoma model to test genes in a recurrently amplified region of chromosome 1 for the ability to cooperate with BRAF(V600E) and accelerate melanoma. SETDB1, an enzyme that methylates histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9), was found to accelerate melanoma formation significantly in zebrafish. Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with massively parallel DNA sequencing and gene expression analyses uncovered genes, including HOX genes, that are transcriptionally dysregulated in response to increased levels of SETDB1. Our studies establish SETDB1 as an oncogene in melanoma and underscore the role of chromatin factors in regulating tumorigenesis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3348545/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3348545/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ceol, Craig J -- Houvras, Yariv -- Jane-Valbuena, Judit -- Bilodeau, Steve -- Orlando, David A -- Battisti, Valentine -- Fritsch, Lauriane -- Lin, William M -- Hollmann, Travis J -- Ferre, Fabrizio -- Bourque, Caitlin -- Burke, Christopher J -- Turner, Laura -- Uong, Audrey -- Johnson, Laura A -- Beroukhim, Rameen -- Mermel, Craig H -- Loda, Massimo -- Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane -- Garraway, Levi A -- Young, Richard A -- Zon, Leonard I -- CA103846/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA146455/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- DK055381/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- HG002668/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- K08 DK075432/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K08 DK075432-04/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K08DK075432-04/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- K99AR056899-02/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R00 AR056899/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R00 AR056899-02/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103846/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103846-09/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA146445/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA146445-03/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG002668/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG002668-08/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Mar 24;471(7339):513-7. doi: 10.1038/nature09806.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Stem Cell Program and Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Boston, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21430779" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Age of Onset ; Amino Acid Substitution ; Animals ; Animals, Genetically Modified ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Chromatin Immunoprecipitation ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1/genetics ; DNA Copy Number Variations/*genetics ; Disease Models, Animal ; Gene Amplification/*genetics ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Genes, Homeobox/genetics ; Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/*genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; Melanocytes/cytology/enzymology/metabolism/pathology ; Melanoma/enzymology/*genetics/*pathology ; Nevus/enzymology ; Oncogenes/genetics ; Protein Methyltransferases/*genetics/*metabolism ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Zebrafish/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2016-03-26
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wala, Jeremiah -- Beroukhim, Rameen -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 25;351(6280):1398-9. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf5542.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Departments of Medical Oncology and Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA, and Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. ; Departments of Medical Oncology and Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA, and Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. rameen_beroukhim@dfci.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27013717" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Chromosome Aberrations ; *Gene Expression Regulation, Leukemic ; Humans ; Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/*genetics ; Proto-Oncogenes/*genetics ; *Sequence Deletion ; *Translocation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Abstract: Current therapies for medulloblastoma, a highly malignant childhood brain tumour, impose debilitating effects on the developing child, and highlight the need for molecularly targeted treatments with reduced toxicity. Previous studies have been unable to identify the full spectrum of driver genes and molecular processes that operate in medulloblastoma subgroups. Here we analyse the somatic landscape across 491 sequenced medulloblastoma samples and the molecular heterogeneity among 1,256 epigenetically analysed cases, and identify subgroup-specific driver alterations that include previously undiscovered actionable targets. Driver mutations were confidently assigned to most patients belonging to Group 3 and Group 4 medulloblastoma subgroups, greatly enhancing previous knowledge. New molecular subtypes were differentially enriched for specific driver events, including hotspot in-frame insertions that target KBTBD4 and 'enhancer hijacking' events that activate PRDM6. Thus, the application of integrative genomics to an extensive cohort of clinical samples derived from a single childhood cancer entity revealed a series of cancer genes and biologically relevant subtype diversity that represent attractive therapeutic targets for the treatment of patients with medulloblastoma.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28726821
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; INHIBITOR ; tumor ; CELL ; PATHWAY ; PROTEIN ; TUMORS ; ACTIVATION ; MECHANISM ; IMPACT ; mechanisms ; PROTEIN-KINASE ; WOMEN ; MUTATION ; inactivation ; p53 ; MUTATIONS ; DEGRADATION ; KINASE-C ; PROTEIN-KINASE-C ; sensitivity ; UBIQUITIN LIGASE ; familial cancer ; GLIOMAS ; Ras ; INHIBITORS ; signaling ; BRAIN-TUMORS ; TUMORIGENESIS ; GLIOMA ; TECHNOLOGY ; senescence ; USA ; EXTENT ; PROMOTES ; HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA-MULTIFORME ; mTOR ; SOMATIC MUTATIONS ; OCCURS ; neurofibromatosis ; tumor suppressor ; Genetic ; therapeutic ; NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE-1 GENE
    Abstract: Loss-of-function mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor result in deregulated Ras signaling and drive tumorigenesis in the familial cancer syndrome neurofibromatosis type I. However, the extent to which NF1 inactivation promotes sporadic tumorigenesis is unknown. Here we report that NF1 is inactivated in sporadic gliomas via two mechanisms: excessive proteasomal degradation and genetic loss. NF1 protein destabilization is triggered by the hyperactivation of protein kinase C (PKC) and confers sensitivity to PKC inhibitors. However, complete genetic loss, which only occurs when p53 is inactivated, mediates sensitivity to mTOR inhibitors. These studies reveal an expanding role for NF1 inactivation in sporadic gliomagenesis and illustrate how different mechanisms of inactivation are utilized in genetically distinct tumors, which consequently impacts therapeutic sensitivity
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19573811
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  • 10
    Keywords: PROTEIN ; CHILDHOOD ; HUMAN CANCERS ; MYC ; HEDGEHOG PATHWAY INHIBITOR ; ALPHA-SYNUCLEIN ; PARKINSONS-DISEASE ; COPY-NUMBER ALTERATION ; BETA FAMILY ; SYNPHILIN-1
    Abstract: Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant paediatric brain tumour, is currently treated with nonspecific cytotoxic therapies including surgery, whole-brain radiation, and aggressive chemotherapy. As medulloblastoma exhibits marked intertumoural heterogeneity, with at least four distinct molecular variants, previous attempts to identify targets for therapy have been underpowered because of small samples sizes. Here we report somatic copy number aberrations (SCNAs) in 1,087 unique medulloblastomas. SCNAs are common in medulloblastoma, and are predominantly subgroup-enriched. The most common region of focal copy number gain is a tandem duplication of SNCAIP, a gene associated with Parkinson's disease, which is exquisitely restricted to Group 4alpha. Recurrent translocations of PVT1, including PVT1-MYC and PVT1-NDRG1, that arise through chromothripsis are restricted to Group 3. Numerous targetable SCNAs, including recurrent events targeting TGF-beta signalling in Group 3, and NF-kappaB signalling in Group 4, suggest future avenues for rational, targeted therapy.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22832581
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