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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-04-18
    Description: Centrosome amplification has long been recognized as a feature of human tumours; however, its role in tumorigenesis remains unclear. Centrosome amplification is poorly tolerated by non-transformed cells and, in the absence of selection, extra centrosomes are spontaneously lost. Thus, the high frequency of centrosome amplification, particularly in more aggressive tumours, raises the possibility that extra centrosomes could, in some contexts, confer advantageous characteristics that promote tumour progression. Using a three-dimensional model system and other approaches to culture human mammary epithelial cells, we find that centrosome amplification triggers cell invasion. This invasive behaviour is similar to that induced by overexpression of the breast cancer oncogene ERBB2 (ref. 4) and indeed enhances invasiveness triggered by ERBB2. Our data indicate that, through increased centrosomal microtubule nucleation, centrosome amplification increases Rac1 activity, which disrupts normal cell-cell adhesion and promotes invasion. These findings demonstrate that centrosome amplification, a structural alteration of the cytoskeleton, can promote features of malignant transformation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4061398/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4061398/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Godinho, Susana A -- Picone, Remigio -- Burute, Mithila -- Dagher, Regina -- Su, Ying -- Leung, Cheuk T -- Polyak, Kornelia -- Brugge, Joan S -- Thery, Manuel -- Pellman, David -- 310472/European Research Council/International -- GM083299-1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM083299/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jun 5;510(7503):167-71. doi: 10.1038/nature13277. Epub 2014 Apr 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3] Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK (S.A.G.); Department of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA (C.T.L.). ; 1] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Institut de Recherche en Technologie et Science pour le Vivant, UMR5168 CEA/UJF/INRA/CNRS, Grenoble, France [2] Hopital Saint Louis, Institut Universitaire d'Hematologie, U1160 INSERM/AP-HP/Universite Paris Diderot, Paris 75010, France [3] CYTOO SA, Grenoble 38054, France. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK (S.A.G.); Department of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA (C.T.L.). ; Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Institut de Recherche en Technologie et Science pour le Vivant, UMR5168 CEA/UJF/INRA/CNRS, Grenoble, France [2] Hopital Saint Louis, Institut Universitaire d'Hematologie, U1160 INSERM/AP-HP/Universite Paris Diderot, Paris 75010, France.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24739973" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aneuploidy ; Breast/cytology/pathology ; Breast Neoplasms/genetics/*pathology ; Cell Adhesion ; Cell Line ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/genetics/*pathology ; Centrosome/*pathology ; Disease Progression ; Enzyme Activation ; Epithelial Cells/cytology/pathology ; *Genes, erbB-2 ; Humans ; Microtubules/chemistry/metabolism/pathology ; Neoplasm Invasiveness/pathology ; Receptor, ErbB-2/genetics/metabolism ; rac1 GTP-Binding Protein/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-01-20
    Description: The involvement of whole-chromosome aneuploidy in tumorigenesis is the subject of debate, in large part because of the lack of insight into underlying mechanisms. Here we identify a mechanism by which errors in mitotic chromosome segregation generate DNA breaks via the formation of structures called micronuclei. Whole-chromosome-containing micronuclei form when mitotic errors produce lagging chromosomes. We tracked the fate of newly generated micronuclei and found that they undergo defective and asynchronous DNA replication, resulting in DNA damage and often extensive fragmentation of the chromosome in the micronucleus. Micronuclei can persist in cells over several generations but the chromosome in the micronucleus can also be distributed to daughter nuclei. Thus, chromosome segregation errors potentially lead to mutations and chromosome rearrangements that can integrate into the genome. Pulverization of chromosomes in micronuclei may also be one explanation for 'chromothripsis' in cancer and developmental disorders, where isolated chromosomes or chromosome arms undergo massive local DNA breakage and rearrangement.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3271137/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3271137/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Crasta, Karen -- Ganem, Neil J -- Dagher, Regina -- Lantermann, Alexandra B -- Ivanova, Elena V -- Pan, Yunfeng -- Nezi, Luigi -- Protopopov, Alexei -- Chowdhury, Dipanjan -- Pellman, David -- 1R01CA142698-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- GM083299/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R00 CA154531/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA142698/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM083299/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM083299-14/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jan 18;482(7383):53-8. doi: 10.1038/nature10802.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22258507" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Aneuploidy ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/genetics/pathology ; *Chromosome Breakage ; Chromosome Segregation ; Comet Assay ; DNA Fragmentation ; DNA Replication ; Humans ; *Micronuclei, Chromosome-Defective ; *Mitosis/genetics ; Neoplasms/etiology/genetics/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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