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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-03-29
    Description: Successful mammalian cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) into unfertilized, metaphase II (MII)-arrested oocytes attests to the cytoplasmic presence of reprogramming factors capable of inducing totipotency in somatic cell nuclei. However, these poorly defined maternal factors presumably decline sharply after fertilization, as the cytoplasm of pronuclear-stage zygotes is reportedly inactive. Recent evidence suggests that zygotic cytoplasm, if maintained at metaphase, can also support derivation of embryonic stem (ES) cells after SCNT, albeit at low efficiency. This led to the conclusion that critical oocyte reprogramming factors present in the metaphase but not in the interphase cytoplasm are 'trapped' inside the nucleus during interphase and effectively removed during enucleation. Here we investigated the presence of reprogramming activity in the cytoplasm of interphase two-cell mouse embryos (I2C). First, the presence of candidate reprogramming factors was documented in both intact and enucleated metaphase and interphase zygotes and two-cell embryos. Consequently, enucleation did not provide a likely explanation for the inability of interphase cytoplasm to induce reprogramming. Second, when we carefully synchronized the cell cycle stage between the transplanted nucleus (ES cell, fetal fibroblast or terminally differentiated cumulus cell) and the recipient I2C cytoplasm, the reconstructed SCNT embryos developed into blastocysts and ES cells capable of contributing to traditional germline and tetraploid chimaeras. Last, direct transfer of cloned embryos, reconstructed with ES cell nuclei, into recipients resulted in live offspring. Thus, the cytoplasm of I2C supports efficient reprogramming, with cell cycle synchronization between the donor nucleus and recipient cytoplasm as the most critical parameter determining success. The ability to use interphase cytoplasm in SCNT could aid efforts to generate autologous human ES cells for regenerative applications, as donated or discarded embryos are more accessible than unfertilized MII oocytes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4124901/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4124901/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Eunju -- Wu, Guangming -- Ma, Hong -- Li, Ying -- Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca -- Tachibana, Masahito -- Sparman, Michelle -- Wolf, Don P -- Scholer, Hans R -- Mitalipov, Shoukhrat -- P51 OD011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- P51OD011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY021214/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD057121/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD059946/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD063276/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01EY021214/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01HD057121/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01HD059946/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01HD063276/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 May 1;509(7498):101-4. doi: 10.1038/nature13134. Epub 2014 Mar 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Munster 48149, Germany. ; 1] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [2] South Miyagi Medical Center, Miyagi 989-1253, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670652" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Count ; *Cellular Reprogramming ; Cloning, Organism ; Cytoplasm/*metabolism ; Embryo, Mammalian/*cytology ; Embryonic Stem Cells/*cytology ; Female ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/*cytology ; *Interphase ; Male ; Metaphase ; Mice ; *Nuclear Transfer Techniques
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-10-30
    Description: Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are associated with severe human diseases and are maternally inherited through the egg's cytoplasm. Here we investigated the feasibility of mtDNA replacement in human oocytes by spindle transfer (ST; also called spindle-chromosomal complex transfer). Of 106 human oocytes donated for research, 65 were subjected to reciprocal ST and 33 served as controls. Fertilization rate in ST oocytes (73%) was similar to controls (75%); however, a significant portion of ST zygotes (52%) showed abnormal fertilization as determined by an irregular number of pronuclei. Among normally fertilized ST zygotes, blastocyst development (62%) and embryonic stem cell isolation (38%) rates were comparable to controls. All embryonic stem cell lines derived from ST zygotes had normal euploid karyotypes and contained exclusively donor mtDNA. The mtDNA can be efficiently replaced in human oocytes. Although some ST oocytes displayed abnormal fertilization, remaining embryos were capable of developing to blastocysts and producing embryonic stem cells similar to controls.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3561483/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3561483/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tachibana, Masahito -- Amato, Paula -- Sparman, Michelle -- Woodward, Joy -- Sanchis, Dario Melguizo -- Ma, Hong -- Gutierrez, Nuria Marti -- Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca -- Kang, Eunju -- Lee, Hyo-Sang -- Ramsey, Cathy -- Masterson, Keith -- Battaglia, David -- Lee, David -- Wu, Diana -- Jensen, Jeffrey -- Patton, Phillip -- Gokhale, Sumita -- Stouffer, Richard -- Mitalipov, Shoukhrat -- 8P51OD011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- EY021214/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- HD057121/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- HD059946/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- HD063276/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- P51 OD011092/OD/NIH HHS/ -- P51 RR000163/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY021214/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD057121/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD059946/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD063276/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jan 31;493(7434):627-31. doi: 10.1038/nature11647. Epub 2012 Oct 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Reproductive & Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 NW 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23103867" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Animals ; Cell Nucleus/genetics ; Cryopreservation ; Cytoplasm/genetics ; DNA, Mitochondrial/analysis/genetics ; Embryo, Mammalian/embryology ; Embryonic Stem Cells/cytology ; Female ; Fertilization ; *Genetic Therapy ; Humans ; Macaca mulatta/genetics/growth & development ; Microsatellite Repeats/genetics ; Mitochondrial Diseases/*genetics/*therapy ; Nuclear Transfer Techniques/*standards ; Oocytes/cytology ; Pregnancy ; Young Adult ; Zygote/cytology/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-07-11
    Description: Human pluripotent stem cells hold potential for regenerative medicine, but available cell types have significant limitations. Although embryonic stem cells (ES cells) from in vitro fertilized embryos (IVF ES cells) represent the 'gold standard', they are allogeneic to patients. Autologous induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) are prone to epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations. To determine whether such abnormalities are intrinsic to somatic cell reprogramming or secondary to the reprogramming method, genetically matched sets of human IVF ES cells, iPS cells and nuclear transfer ES cells (NT ES cells) derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) were subjected to genome-wide analyses. Both NT ES cells and iPS cells derived from the same somatic cells contained comparable numbers of de novo copy number variations. In contrast, DNA methylation and transcriptome profiles of NT ES cells corresponded closely to those of IVF ES cells, whereas iPS cells differed and retained residual DNA methylation patterns typical of parental somatic cells. Thus, human somatic cells can be faithfully reprogrammed to pluripotency by SCNT and are therefore ideal for cell replacement therapies.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ma, Hong -- Morey, Robert -- O'Neil, Ryan C -- He, Yupeng -- Daughtry, Brittany -- Schultz, Matthew D -- Hariharan, Manoj -- Nery, Joseph R -- Castanon, Rosa -- Sabatini, Karen -- Thiagarajan, Rathi D -- Tachibana, Masahito -- Kang, Eunju -- Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca -- Ahmed, Riffat -- Gutierrez, Nuria Marti -- Van Dyken, Crystal -- Polat, Alim -- Sugawara, Atsushi -- Sparman, Michelle -- Gokhale, Sumita -- Amato, Paula -- Wolf, Don P -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Laurent, Louise C -- Mitalipov, Shoukhrat -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jul 10;511(7508):177-83. doi: 10.1038/nature13551. Epub 2014 Jul 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [3]. ; 1] Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2]. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Bioinformatics Program, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [2] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, South Miyagi Medical Center, Shibata-gun, Miyagi 989-1253, Japan (M.T.); Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden (A.P.). ; Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; University Pathologists LLC, Boston University School of Medicine, Roger Williams Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island 02118, USA. ; Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. ; 1] Genomic Analysis Laboratory, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 Southwest Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive and Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, 505 Northwest 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA [3] Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health & Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25008523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; *Cellular Reprogramming ; Chromosome Aberrations ; Chromosomes, Human, X/genetics/metabolism ; DNA Copy Number Variations ; DNA Methylation ; Genome-Wide Association Study ; Genomic Imprinting ; Humans ; Nuclear Transfer Techniques/standards ; Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology/*metabolism ; Transcriptome
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-07-16
    Description: Mitochondria have a major role in energy production via oxidative phosphorylation, which is dependent on the expression of critical genes encoded by mitochondrial (mt)DNA. Mutations in mtDNA can cause fatal or severely debilitating disorders with limited treatment options. Clinical manifestations vary based on mutation type and heteroplasmy (that is, the relative levels of mutant and wild-type mtDNA within each cell). Here we generated genetically corrected pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from patients with mtDNA disease. Multiple induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines were derived from patients with common heteroplasmic mutations including 3243A〉G, causing mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), and 8993T〉G and 13513G〉A, implicated in Leigh syndrome. Isogenic MELAS and Leigh syndrome iPS cell lines were generated containing exclusively wild-type or mutant mtDNA through spontaneous segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA in proliferating fibroblasts. Furthermore, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) enabled replacement of mutant mtDNA from homoplasmic 8993T〉G fibroblasts to generate corrected Leigh-NT1 PSCs. Although Leigh-NT1 PSCs contained donor oocyte wild-type mtDNA (human haplotype D4a) that differed from Leigh syndrome patient haplotype (F1a) at a total of 47 nucleotide sites, Leigh-NT1 cells displayed transcriptomic profiles similar to those in embryo-derived PSCs carrying wild-type mtDNA, indicative of normal nuclear-to-mitochondrial interactions. Moreover, genetically rescued patient PSCs displayed normal metabolic function compared to impaired oxygen consumption and ATP production observed in mutant cells. We conclude that both reprogramming approaches offer complementary strategies for derivation of PSCs containing exclusively wild-type mtDNA, through spontaneous segregation of heteroplasmic mtDNA in individual iPS cell lines or mitochondrial replacement by SCNT in homoplasmic mtDNA-based disease.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ma, Hong -- Folmes, Clifford D L -- Wu, Jun -- Morey, Robert -- Mora-Castilla, Sergio -- Ocampo, Alejandro -- Ma, Li -- Poulton, Joanna -- Wang, Xinjian -- Ahmed, Riffat -- Kang, Eunju -- Lee, Yeonmi -- Hayama, Tomonari -- Li, Ying -- Van Dyken, Crystal -- Gutierrez, Nuria Marti -- Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca -- Koski, Amy -- Mitalipov, Nargiz -- Amato, Paula -- Wolf, Don P -- Huang, Taosheng -- Terzic, Andre -- Laurent, Louise C -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- Mitalipov, Shoukhrat -- England -- Nature. 2015 Aug 13;524(7564):234-8. doi: 10.1038/nature14546. Epub 2015 Jul 15.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, Oregon Health &Science University, 3303 S.W. Bond Avenue, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA [2] Division of Reproductive &Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health &Science University, 505 N.W. 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA. ; Center for Regenerative Medicine and Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. ; Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Reproductive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine, 2880 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. ; Division of Human Genetics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA. ; Division of Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, Oregon 97239, USA. ; Division of Reproductive &Developmental Sciences, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health &Science University, 505 N.W. 185th Avenue, Beaverton, Oregon 97006, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26176921" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism ; Animals ; Cell Line ; DNA, Mitochondrial/*genetics ; Embryo, Mammalian/cytology ; Fibroblasts/cytology/metabolism/pathology ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Haplotypes/genetics ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/*metabolism ; Leigh Disease/genetics/metabolism/pathology ; Mice ; Mitochondria/*genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Mitochondrial Diseases/*genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathies/genetics/metabolism/pathology ; Mutation/genetics ; Nuclear Transfer Techniques ; Nucleotides/genetics ; Oxygen Consumption ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Skin/cytology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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