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  • 1
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    Hoboken, N.J : BiblioBytes
    Keywords: French drama., lcsh
    ISBN: 0-585-04984-X
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  • 2
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; IN-VIVO ; PATHWAYS ; PROTEIN ; SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE ; COMPLEX ; COMPLEXES ; BINDING ; IDENTIFICATION ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae ; YEAST ; lifestyle ; BETA ; CONSERVATION ; EGG EXTRACTS ; GTPASE RAN ; IMPORTIN-ALPHA ; LOCALIZATION ; MESSENGER-RNA EXPORT ; NUCLEAR EXPORT RECEPTOR ; NUCLEUS ; TRANSPORT FACTOR ; XENOPUS
    Abstract: The small Ras-like GTPase Ran plays an essential role in the transport of macromolecules in and out of the nucleus and has been implicated in spindle (1, 2) and nuclear envelope formation (3, 4) during mitosis in higher eukaryotes. We identified Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame YGL164c encoding a novel RanGTP-binding protein, termed Yrb30p. The protein competes with yeast RanBP1 (Yrb1p) for binding to the GTP-bound form of yeast Ran (Gsp1p) and is, like Yrb1p, able to form trimeric complexes with RanGTP and some of the karyopherins. In contrast to Yrb1p, Yrb30p does not coactivate but inhibits RanGAP1(Rna1p)-mediated GTP hydrolysis on Ran, like the karyopherins. At steady state, Yrb30p localizes exclusively to the cytoplasm, but the presence of a functional nuclear export signal and the localization of truncated forms of Yrb30p suggest that the protein shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm and is exported via two alternative pathways, dependent on the nuclear export receptor Xpo1p/Crm1p and on RanGTP binding. Whereas overproduction of the full-length protein and complete deletion of the open reading frame reveal no obvious phenotype, overproduction of C-terminally truncated forms of the protein inhibits yeast vegetative growth. Based on these results and the exclusive conservation of the protein in the fungal kingdom, we hypothesize that Yrb30p represents a novel modulator of the Ran GTPase switch related to fungal lifestyle
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 12578832
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; cohort study ; RISK ; PROTEIN ; DIFFERENTIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; AGE ; nutrition ; pancreatic cancer ; CELL-GROWTH ; FACTOR-ALPHA ; IGF-I ; EPIC PROJECT ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; SERUM-LEVELS ; C-PEPTIDE ; IGFBP-3 ; MALE SMOKERS ; FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; prospective cohorts
    Abstract: Background:Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (BPs) regulate cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, and may have a role in the aetiology of various cancers. Information on their role in pancreatic cancer is limited and was examined here in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.Methods:Serum concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 422 cases and 422 controls matched on age, sex, study centre, recruitment date, and time since last meal. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for confounding variables.Results:Neither circulating levels of IGF-I (OR=1.21, 95% CI 0.75-1.93 for top vs bottom quartile, P-trend 0.301), IGFBP-3 (OR=1.00, 95% CI 0.66-1.51, P-trend 0.79), nor the molar IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio, an indicator of free IGF-I level (OR=1.22, 95% CI 0.75-1.97, P-trend 0.27), were statistically significantly associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. In a cross-classification, however, a high concentration of IGF-I with concurrently low levels of IGFBP-3 was related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR=1.72, 95% CI 1.05-2.83; P-interaction=0.154).Conclusion:On the basis of these results, circulating levels of components of the IGF axis do not appear to be the risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, on the basis of the results of a subanalysis, it cannot be excluded that a relatively large amount of IGF-1 together with very low levels of IGFBP-3 might still be associated with an increase in pancreatic cancer risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22315049
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  • 4
    Keywords: CELL LUNG-CANCER ; RISK ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; COLON-CANCER ; CALCIUM ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; VITAMIN-D-RECEPTOR ; SERUM 25-HYDROXYVITAMIN-D ; 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D-3 ; SUPPLEMENT USE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Individuals with higher blood 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels have a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC), but the influence of 25(OH)D on mortality after CRC diagnosis is unknown. METHODS: The association between prediagnostic 25(OH)D levels and CRC-specific (N = 444) and overall mortality (N = 541) was prospectively examined among 1,202 participants diagnosed with CRC between 1992 and 2003 in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate HRs and corresponding 95% CIs according to 25(OH)D quintiles and genetic variation within the VDR and CASR genes. Potential dietary, lifestyle, and metabolic effect modifiers were also investigated. RESULTS: There were 541 deaths, 444 (82%) due to CRC. Mean follow-up was 73 months. In multivariable analysis, higher 25(OH)D levels were associated with a statistically significant reduction in CRC-specific (P(trend) = 0.04) and overall mortality (P(trend) = 0.01). Participants with 25(OH)D levels in the highest quintile had an adjusted HR of 0.69 (95% CI: 0.50-0.93) for CRC-specific mortality and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.50-0.88) for overall mortality, compared with the lowest quintile. Except for a possible interaction by prediagnostic dietary calcium intake (P(interaction) = 0.01), no other potential modifying factors related to CRC survival were noted. The VDR (FokI and BsmI) and CASR (rs1801725) genotypes were not associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS: High prediagnostic 25(OH)D levels are associated with improved survival of patients with CRC. Impact: Our findings may stimulate further research directed at investigating the effects of blood vitamin D levels before, at, and after CRC diagnosis on outcomes in CRC patients. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 21(4); 582-93. (c)2012 AACR.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22278364
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  • 5
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; RAGE ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; SPLICE VARIANTS
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptors (RAGE) have been implicated in cancer development through their proinflammatory capabilities. However, prospective data on their association with cancer of specific sites, including pancreatic cancer, are limited. METHODS: Prediagnostic blood levels of the AGE product Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and the endogenous secreted receptor for AGE (esRAGE) were measured using ELISA in 454 patients with exocrine pancreatic cancer and individually matched controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Pancreatic cancer risk was estimated by calculating ORs with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Elevated CML levels tended to be associated with a reduction in pancreatic cancer risk [OR = 0.57 (95% CI, 0.32-1.01) comparing highest with lowest quintile), whereas no association was observed for esRAGE (OR = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.62-1.54). Adjustments for body mass index and smoking attenuated the inverse associations of CML with pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.41-1.49). There was an inverse association between esRAGE and risk of pancreatic cancer for cases that were diagnosed within the first 2 years of follow-up [OR = 0.46 (95% CI, 0.22-0.96) for a doubling in concentration], whereas there was no association among those with a longer follow-up (OR = 1.11; 95% CI, 0.88-1.39; P(interaction) = 0.002). Conclusions and Impact: Our results do not provide evidence for an association of higher CML or lower esRAGE levels with risk of pancreatic cancer. The role of AGE/RAGE in pancreatic cancer would benefit from further investigations. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 21(4); 619-28. (c)2012 AACR.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22301828
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  • 6
    Keywords: PROTECTION ; COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; MEASUREMENT ERROR ; PROJECT ; CALIBRATION ; EPIDEMIOLOGIC EVIDENCE ; carbohydrate ; glycemic index ; NONSTARCH POLYSACCHARIDES
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Earlier analyses within the EPIC study showed that dietary fibre intake was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, but results from some large cohort studies do not support this finding. We explored whether the association remained after longer follow-up with a near threefold increase in colorectal cancer cases, and if the association varied by gender and tumour location. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After a mean follow-up of 11.0 years, 4,517 incident cases of colorectal cancer were documented. Total, cereal, fruit, and vegetable fibre intakes were estimated from dietary questionnaires at baseline. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and centre, and adjusted for total energy intake, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, education, menopausal status, hormone replacement therapy, oral contraceptive use, and intakes of alcohol, folate, red and processed meats, and calcium. After multivariable adjustments, total dietary fibre was inversely associated with colorectal cancer (HR per 10 g/day increase in fibre 0.87, 95% CI: 0.79-0.96). Similar linear associations were observed for colon and rectal cancers. The association between total dietary fibre and risk of colorectal cancer risk did not differ by age, sex, or anthropometric, lifestyle, and dietary variables. Fibre from cereals and fibre from fruit and vegetables were similarly associated with colon cancer; but for rectal cancer, the inverse association was only evident for fibre from cereals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results strengthen the evidence for the role of high dietary fibre intake in colorectal cancer prevention.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22761771
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  • 7
    Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma ; Diabetes Mellitus ; biliary tract neoplasms ; diabetes duration ; gallbladder neoplasms ; insulin treatment
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Evidence on associations between self-reported diabetes mellitus, diabetes duration, age at diabetes diagnosis, insulin treatment, and risk of biliary tract cancer (BTC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), independent of general and abdominal obesity is scarce. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective analysis in the EPIC-cohort study among 363 426 participants with self-reported diabetes data. Multivariable adjusted relative risks and 95% confidence intervals were estimated from Cox regression models. In a nested case-control subset, analyses were carried out in HCV/HBV-negative individuals. RESULTS: During 8.5 years of follow-up, 204 BTC cases [including 75 gallbladder cancer (GBC) cases], and 176 HCC cases were identified. Independent of body mass index and waist-to-height ratio diabetes status was associated with higher risk of BTC and HCC [1.77 (1.00-3.13) and 2.17 (1.36-3.47)]. For BTC, the risk seemed to be higher in participants with shorter diabetes duration and those not treated with insulin. Regarding cancer subsites, diabetes was only associated with GBC [2.72 (1.17-6.31)]. The risk for HCC was particularly higher in participants treated with insulin. The results were not appreciably different in HCV/HBV-negative individuals. CONCLUSION(S): This study supports the hypothesis that diabetes is a risk factor for BTC (particularly GBC) and HCC. Further research is required to establish whether diabetes treatment or duration is associated with these cancers.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23720454
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  • 8
    Keywords: CELLS ; RAT ; HEALTH ; GREEN TEA ; POLYPHENOLS ; caffeine ; BLACK TEA ; COLONIC ABERRANT CRYPTS ; COMPONENTS KAHWEOL ; CAFESTOL
    Abstract: Coffee and tea contain numerous antimutagenic and antioxidant components and high levels of caffeine that may protect against colorectal cancer (CRC). We investigated the association between coffee and tea consumption and CRC risk and studied potential effect modification by CYP1A2 and NAT2 genotypes, enzymes involved in the metabolization of caffeine. Data from 477,071 participants (70.2% female) of the European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort study were analyzed. At baseline (1992-2000) habitual (total, caffeinated and decaffeinated) coffee and tea consumption was assessed with dietary questionnaires. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratio's (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Potential effect modification by genotype-based CYP1A2 and NAT2 activity was studied in a nested case-control set of 1,252 cases and 2,175 controls. After a median follow-up of 11.6 years, 4,234 participants developed CRC (mean age 64.7 +/- 8.3 years). Total coffee consumption (high vs. non/low) was not associated with CRC risk (HR 1.06, 95% CI 0.95-1.18) or subsite cancers, and no significant associations were found for caffeinated (HR 1.10, 95% CI 0.97-1.26) and decaffeinated coffee (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.84-1.11) and tea (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.86-1.09). High coffee and tea consuming subjects with slow CYP1A2 or NAT2 activity had a similar CRC risk compared to non/low coffee and tea consuming subjects with a fast CYP1A2 or NAT2 activity, which suggests that caffeine metabolism does not affect the link between coffee and tea consumption and CRC risk. This study shows that coffee and tea consumption is not likely to be associated with overall CRC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24318358
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  • 9
    Keywords: COHORT ; PRIMARY LIVER-CANCER ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; DIET ; IGF-I ; EPIC PROJECT ; METAANALYSIS ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; HEPATITIS-B ; IGFBP-3
    Abstract: Intake of dairy products has been associated with risk of some cancers, but findings are often inconsistent and information on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is limited, particularly from prospective settings. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between consumption of total and specific dairy products (milk/cheese/yogurt) and their components (calcium/vitamin D/fats/protein), with first incident HCC (N(cases) = 191) in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, including a nested case-control subset (N(cases) = 122) with the assessment of hepatitis B virus/hepatitis C virus infections status, liver damage and circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I levels. For cohort analyses, multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). For nested case-control analyses, conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% CI. A total of 477,206 participants were followed-up for an average of 11 years (person-years follow-up = 5,415,385). In the cohort study, a significant positive HCC risk association was observed for total dairy products (highest vs. lowest tertile, HR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.13-2.43; p(trend) = 0.012), milk (HR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.02-2.24; p(trend) = 0.049), and cheese (HR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.02-2.38; p(trend) = 0.101), but not yogurt (HR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.65-1.35). Dietary calcium, vitamin D, fat and protein from dairy sources were associated with increased HCC risk, whereas the same nutrients from nondairy sources showed inverse or null associations. In the nested case-control study, similar results were observed among hepatitis-free individuals. Results from this large prospective cohort study suggest that higher consumption of dairy products, particularly milk and cheese, may be associated with increased HCC risk. Validation of these findings in other populations is necessary. Potential biologic mechanisms require further exploration.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24615266
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  • 10
    Keywords: RISK-FACTORS ; REPRODUCIBILITY ; nutrient intake ; INFLAMMATORY-BOWEL-DISEASE ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; EPIC PROJECT ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; DIETARY ASSESSMENT METHODS ; EUROPEAN PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; GUT MICROBIOTA
    Abstract: BACKGROUND:: Diet may have a role in the etiology of inflammatory bowel disease. In previous studies, the associations between increased intakes of carbohydrates, sugar, starch, and inflammatory bowel disease are inconsistent. However, few prospective studies have investigated the associations between these macronutrients and incident Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC). METHODS:: A total of 401,326 men and women were recruited between 1991 and 1998. At recruitment, dietary intakes of carbohydrate, sugar, and starch were measured using validated food frequency questionnaires. The cohort was monitored identifying participants who developed incident CD or UC. Cases were matched with 4 controls, and odds ratios were calculated for quintiles of total carbohydrate, sugar, and starch intakes adjusted for total energy intake, body mass index, and smoking. RESULTS:: One hundred ten participants developed CD, and 244 participants developed UC during follow-up. The adjusted odds ratio for the highest versus the lowest quintiles of total carbohydrate intake for CD was 0.87, 95% CI = 0.24 to 3.12 and for UC 1.46, 95% CI = 0.62 to 3.46, with no significant trends across quintiles for either (CD, Ptrend = 0.70; UC, Ptrend = 0.41). Similarly, no associations were observed with intakes of total sugar (CD, Ptrend = 0.50; UC, Ptrend = 0.71) or starch (CD, Ptrend = 0.69; UC, Ptrend = 0.17). CONCLUSIONS:: The lack of associations with these nutrients is in agreement with many case-control studies that have not identified associations with CD or UC. As there is biological plausibility for how specific carbohydrates could have an etiological role in inflammatory bowel disease, future epidemiological work should assess individual carbohydrates, although there does not seem to be a macronutrient effect.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 3.0 License, where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25265262
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