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  • 1
    ISSN: 1420-9098
    Keywords: Hymenoptera ; social wasps ; Polybia ; prey capture
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary Polybia sericea (Hymenoptera: Vespidae) prey foraging was studied by following individual foragers as they hunted in the field, by observing how wasps handled prey once they had captured it, and by observing wasps as they returned to the nest with prey. Wasps were most likely to forage for prey between 0700 and 1300 hours and between 1600 and 1700 hours. The prey foraging sequence consisted of the behaviours high flight, search, touch, land, groom, walk, bite and malaxate. Captured small prey were malaxated and carried to the nest. Wasps removed the gut from large prey and dragged the meat up a twig or grass stem. A load of the meat was then bitten off and malaxated; the remainder was cached while the wasp made an orientation flight and returned to the nest. The forager returned within minutes for the remainder of the prey. Experiments demonstrated that caching the prey remains above the ground rather than close to the ground, where the prey are generally captured, reduces the chance that the prey will be found and expropriated by ants.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1420-9098
    Keywords: Key words:Vespula, Polistes, Vespidae, foraging, resource choice.
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary: The role of visual cues provided by resident wasps on resource choice by yellowjacket and paper wasp foragers was investigated. Large spring queen yellowjackets and small early season yellowjacket foragers (Vespula germanica, Vespula maculifrons, and Vespula vidua) were extracted in hexane to remove odors and posed as though feeding at petri dish feeders bearing daisy-like flower models, equipped with microcapillary feeding tubes, and containing 1:3 honey:water solution. An array of five feeders was presented to foragers at a suburban and a woodland site in Saratoga Springs, New York. The visual cues provided by resident wasps influenced resource choice by approaching social wasp foragers. Vespula germanica, an introduced yellowjacket species that tends to dominate at rich resources, was the only wasp visiting the suburban feeders. Foragers of this species preferentially fed on feeders and flowers with posed wasps and fed most often next to large wasps. Polistes fuscatus foragers at the woodland site similarly preferred to feed on occupied feeders and flowers. Vespula maculifrons and V. consobrina preferentially visited unoccupied feeders. Individual V. maculifrons, V. consobrina and V. vidua foragers that landed on occupied feeders all preferentially visited unoccupied flowers on those feeders. Vespula vidua and V. flavopilosa foragers did not demonstrate a feeder preference based on the presence/absence of posed wasps. Vespula consobrina foragers that visited occupied feeders preferred those occupied by extracted V. maculifrons queens and workers; no other wasps showed species based landing preferences.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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