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  • 1
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  60th Annual Meeting of the German Society for Neuropathology and Neuroanatomy (DGNN); 20150826-20150828; Berlin; DOC15dgnnNO5 /20150825/
    Publication Date: 2015-08-26
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 2
    Keywords: brain ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; HYBRIDIZATION ; TUMORS ; UNITED-STATES ; GLIOMAS ; MULTIFORME ; temozolomide ; CODON 132 MUTATION ; IDH2 MUTATIONS
    Abstract: The prognosis of glioblastoma, the most malignant type of glioma, is still poor, with only a minority of patients showing long-term survival of more than three years after diagnosis. To elucidate the molecular aberrations in glioblastomas of long-term survivors, we performed genome- and/or transcriptome-wide molecular profiling of glioblastoma samples from 94 patients, including 28 long-term survivors with 〉36 months overall survival (OS), 20 short-term survivors with 〈12 months OS and 46 patients with intermediate OS. Integrative bioinformatic analyses were used to characterize molecular aberrations in the distinct survival groups considering established molecular markers such as isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/2) mutations, and O(6) -methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation. Patients with long-term survival were younger and more often had IDH1/2-mutant and MGMT-methylated tumors. Gene expression profiling revealed over-representation of a distinct (proneural-like) expression signature in long-term survivors that was linked to IDH1/2 mutation. However, IDH1/2-wildtype glioblastomas from long-term survivors did not show distinct gene expression profiles and included proneural, classical and mesenchymal glioblastoma subtypes. Genomic imbalances also differed between IDH1/2-mutant and IDH1/2-wildtype tumors, but not between survival groups of IDH1/2-wildtype patients. Thus, our data support an important role for MGMT promoter methylation and IDH1/2 mutation in glioblastoma long-term survival and corroborate the association of IDH1/2 mutation with distinct genomic and transcriptional profiles. Importantly, however, IDH1/2-wildtype glioblastomas in our cohort of long-term survivors lacked distinctive DNA copy number changes and gene expression signatures, indicating that other factors might have been responsible for long survival in this particular subgroup of patients.(c) 2014 UICC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24615357
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  • 3
    Keywords: GENE-EXPRESSION ; MALIGNANT GLIOMAS ; GLIOBLASTOMA ; ASTROCYTIC TUMORS ; PHASE-III TRIAL ; IDH1 mutation ; ANAPLASTIC OLIGODENDROGLIOMA ; MGMT PROMOTER METHYLATION ; FREQUENT ATRX ; ADJUVANT PROCARBAZINE
    Abstract: Cerebral gliomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II and III represent a major challenge in terms of histological classification and clinical management. Here, we asked whether large-scale genomic and transcriptomic profiling improves the definition of prognostically distinct entities. We performed microarray-based genome- and transcriptome-wide analyses of primary tumor samples from a prospective German Glioma Network cohort of 137 patients with cerebral gliomas, including 61 WHO grade II and 76 WHO grade III tumors. Integrative bioinformatic analyses were employed to define molecular subgroups, which were then related to histology, molecular biomarkers, including isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/2) mutation, 1p/19q co-deletion and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations, and patient outcome. Genomic profiling identified five distinct glioma groups, including three IDH1/2 mutant and two IDH1/2 wild-type groups. Expression profiling revealed evidence for eight transcriptionally different groups (five IDH1/2 mutant, three IDH1/2 wild type), which were only partially linked to the genomic groups. Correlation of DNA-based molecular stratification with clinical outcome allowed to define three major prognostic groups with characteristic genomic aberrations. The best prognosis was found in patients with IDH1/2 mutant and 1p/19q co-deleted tumors. Patients with IDH1/2 wild-type gliomas and glioblastoma-like genomic alterations, including gain on chromosome arm 7q (+7q), loss on chromosome arm 10q (-10q), TERT promoter mutation and oncogene amplification, displayed the worst outcome. Intermediate survival was seen in patients with IDH1/2 mutant, but 1p/19q intact, mostly astrocytic gliomas, and in patients with IDH1/2 wild-type gliomas lacking the +7q/-10q genotype and TERT promoter mutation. This molecular subgrouping stratified patients into prognostically distinct groups better than histological classification. Addition of gene expression data to this genomic classifier did not further improve prognostic stratification. In summary, DNA-based molecular profiling of WHO grade II and III gliomas distinguishes biologically distinct tumor groups and provides prognostically relevant information beyond histological classification as well as IDH1/2 mutation and 1p/19q co-deletion status.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25783747
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  • 4
    Keywords: GROWTH-FACTOR ; BREAST-CANCER ; INDUCED APOPTOSIS ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; POOR-PROGNOSIS ; TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR P53 ; PROMOTER METHYLATION ; RECURRENT GLIOBLASTOMA ; THERAPEUTIC TARGET ; EXPRESSION PREDICTS
    Abstract: Molecular changes associated with the progression of glioblastoma after standard radiochemotherapy remain poorly understood. We compared genomic profiles of 27 paired primary and recurrent IDH1/2 wild-type glioblastomas by genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization. By bioinformatic analysis, primary and recurrent tumor profiles were normalized and segmented, chromosomal gains and losses identified taking the tumor cell content into account, and difference profiles deduced. Seven of 27 (26%) pairs lacked DNA copy number differences between primary and recurrent tumors (equal pairs). The recurrent tumors in 9/27 (33%) pairs contained all chromosomal imbalances of the primary tumors plus additional ones, suggesting a sequential acquisition of and/or selection for aberrations during progression (sequential pairs). In 11/27 (41%) pairs, the profiles of primary and recurrent tumors were divergent, i.e., the recurrent tumors contained additional aberrations but had lost others, suggesting a polyclonal composition of the primary tumors and considerable clonal evolution (discrepant pairs). Losses on 9p21.3 harboring the CDKN2A/B locus were significantly more common in primary tumors from sequential and discrepant (nonequal) pairs. Nonequal pairs showed ten regions of recurrent genomic differences between primary and recurrent tumors harboring 46 candidate genes associated with tumor recurrence. In particular, copy numbers of genes encoding apoptosis regulators were frequently changed at progression. In summary, approximately 25% of IDH1/2 wild-type glioblastoma pairs have stable genomic imbalances. In contrast, approximately 75% of IDH1/2 wild-type glioblastomas undergo further genomic aberrations and alter their clonal composition upon recurrence impacting their genomic profile, a process possibly facilitated by 9p21.3 loss in the primary tumor. (c) 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24706357
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; CANCER CELLS ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; GROWTH ; IN-VITRO ; proliferation ; SURVIVAL ; tumor ; carcinoma ; CELL ; CELL-PROLIFERATION ; Germany ; human ; INHIBITION ; VITRO ; HEPATOCELLULAR-CARCINOMA ; liver ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; RNA ; TISSUE ; LINES ; PATIENT ; ACTIVATION ; MECHANISM ; FAMILY ; REDUCTION ; TISSUES ; CONTRAST ; mechanisms ; DYNAMICS ; BINDING ; CELL-LINES ; DOWN-REGULATION ; MEMBERS ; treatment ; TARGET ; ELEMENT ; polymer ; hepatocarcinogenesis ; hepatocellular carcinoma ; MOBILITY ; CELL-LINE ; CANCER-CELLS ; MIGRATION ; MORPHOLOGY ; PHENOTYPE ; BINDING-PROTEINS ; C-MYC ; OVEREXPRESSION ; cell lines ; MITOSIS ; BINDING PROTEIN ; HUMAN BREAST-CANCER ; FAMILIES ; TUMOR-GROWTH ; PATIENT SURVIVAL ; cell proliferation ; structure ; MOLECULAR-MECHANISMS ; LEVEL ; bioavailability ; STATHMIN ; USA ; MICROTUBULE DYNAMICS ; MOTILITY ; HUMAN HEPATOCELLULAR-CARCINOMA ; DIVISION ; MALIGNANT PHENOTYPE ; MODIFIERS ; HUMAN HEPATOCARCINOGENESIS
    Abstract: Microtubule-dependent effects are partly regulated by factors that coordinate polymer dynamics such as the microtubule-destabilizing protein stathmin (oncoprotein 18). In cancer cells, increased microtubule turnover affects cell morphology and cellular processes that rely on microtubule dynamics such as mitosis and migration. However, the molecular mechanisms deregulating modifiers of microtubule activity in human hepatocarcinogenesis are poorly understood. Based on profiling data of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we identified far upstream element binding proteins (FBPs) as significantly coregulated with stathmin. Coordinated overexpression of two FBP family members (FBP-1 and FBP-2) in 〉70% of all analyzed human HCCs significantly correlated with poor patient survival. In vitro, FBP-1 predominantly induced tumor cell proliferation, while FBP-2 primarily supported migration in different HCC cell lines. Surprisingly, reduction of FBP-2 levels was associated with elevated FBP-1 expression, suggesting a regulatory interplay of FBP family members that functionally discriminate between cell division and mobility. Expression of FBP-1 correlated with stathmin expression in HCC tissues and inhibition of FBP-1 but not of FBP-2 drastically reduced stathmin at the transcript and protein levels. In contrast, further overexpression of FBP-1 did not affect stathmin bioavailability. Accordingly, analyzing nuclear and cytoplasmic areas of HCC cells revealed that reduced FBP-1 levels affected cell morphology and were associated with a less malignant phenotype. Conclusion: The coordinated activation of FBP-1 and FBP-2 represents a novel and frequent pro-tumorigenic mechanism promoting proliferation (tumor growth) and motility (dissemination) of human liver cancer cells. FBPs promote tumor-relevant functions by at least partly employing the microtubule-destabilizing factor stathmin and represent a new potential target structure for HCC treatment. (HEPATOLOGY 2009;50:1130-1139.)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19585652
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