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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-02-05
    Description: X-ray crystallography provides the vast majority of macromolecular structures, but the success of the method relies on growing crystals of sufficient size. In conventional measurements, the necessary increase in X-ray dose to record data from crystals that are too small leads to extensive damage before a diffraction signal can be recorded. It is particularly challenging to obtain large, well-diffracting crystals of membrane proteins, for which fewer than 300 unique structures have been determined despite their importance in all living cells. Here we present a method for structure determination where single-crystal X-ray diffraction 'snapshots' are collected from a fully hydrated stream of nanocrystals using femtosecond pulses from a hard-X-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source. We prove this concept with nanocrystals of photosystem I, one of the largest membrane protein complexes. More than 3,000,000 diffraction patterns were collected in this study, and a three-dimensional data set was assembled from individual photosystem I nanocrystals ( approximately 200 nm to 2 mum in size). We mitigate the problem of radiation damage in crystallography by using pulses briefer than the timescale of most damage processes. This offers a new approach to structure determination of macromolecules that do not yield crystals of sufficient size for studies using conventional radiation sources or are particularly sensitive to radiation damage.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3429598/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3429598/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chapman, Henry N -- Fromme, Petra -- Barty, Anton -- White, Thomas A -- Kirian, Richard A -- Aquila, Andrew -- Hunter, Mark S -- Schulz, Joachim -- DePonte, Daniel P -- Weierstall, Uwe -- Doak, R Bruce -- Maia, Filipe R N C -- Martin, Andrew V -- Schlichting, Ilme -- Lomb, Lukas -- Coppola, Nicola -- Shoeman, Robert L -- Epp, Sascha W -- Hartmann, Robert -- Rolles, Daniel -- Rudenko, Artem -- Foucar, Lutz -- Kimmel, Nils -- Weidenspointner, Georg -- Holl, Peter -- Liang, Mengning -- Barthelmess, Miriam -- Caleman, Carl -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Bogan, Michael J -- Krzywinski, Jacek -- Bostedt, Christoph -- Bajt, Sasa -- Gumprecht, Lars -- Rudek, Benedikt -- Erk, Benjamin -- Schmidt, Carlo -- Homke, Andre -- Reich, Christian -- Pietschner, Daniel -- Struder, Lothar -- Hauser, Gunter -- Gorke, Hubert -- Ullrich, Joachim -- Herrmann, Sven -- Schaller, Gerhard -- Schopper, Florian -- Soltau, Heike -- Kuhnel, Kai-Uwe -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Bozek, John D -- Hau-Riege, Stefan P -- Frank, Matthias -- Hampton, Christina Y -- Sierra, Raymond G -- Starodub, Dmitri -- Williams, Garth J -- Hajdu, Janos -- Timneanu, Nicusor -- Seibert, M Marvin -- Andreasson, Jakob -- Rocker, Andrea -- Jonsson, Olof -- Svenda, Martin -- Stern, Stephan -- Nass, Karol -- Andritschke, Robert -- Schroter, Claus-Dieter -- Krasniqi, Faton -- Bott, Mario -- Schmidt, Kevin E -- Wang, Xiaoyu -- Grotjohann, Ingo -- Holton, James M -- Barends, Thomas R M -- Neutze, Richard -- Marchesini, Stefano -- Fromme, Raimund -- Schorb, Sebastian -- Rupp, Daniela -- Adolph, Marcus -- Gorkhover, Tais -- Andersson, Inger -- Hirsemann, Helmut -- Potdevin, Guillaume -- Graafsma, Heinz -- Nilsson, Bjorn -- Spence, John C H -- 1R01GM095583-01/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- 1U54GM094625-01/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094599/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094625/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Feb 3;470(7332):73-7. doi: 10.1038/nature09750.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. henry.chapman@desy.de〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21293373" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Crystallography, X-Ray/instrumentation/*methods ; Lasers ; Models, Molecular ; Nanoparticles/*chemistry ; Nanotechnology/instrumentation/*methods ; Photosystem I Protein Complex/*chemistry ; Protein Conformation ; Time Factors ; X-Rays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-06-20
    Description: Water has a number of anomalous physical properties, and some of these become drastically enhanced on supercooling below the freezing point. Particular interest has focused on thermodynamic response functions that can be described using a normal component and an anomalous component that seems to diverge at about 228 kelvin (refs 1-3). This has prompted debate about conflicting theories that aim to explain many of the anomalous thermodynamic properties of water. One popular theory attributes the divergence to a phase transition between two forms of liquid water occurring in the 'no man's land' that lies below the homogeneous ice nucleation temperature (TH) at approximately 232 kelvin and above about 160 kelvin, and where rapid ice crystallization has prevented any measurements of the bulk liquid phase. In fact, the reliable determination of the structure of liquid water typically requires temperatures above about 250 kelvin. Water crystallization has been inhibited by using nanoconfinement, nanodroplets and association with biomolecules to give liquid samples at temperatures below TH, but such measurements rely on nanoscopic volumes of water where the interaction with the confining surfaces makes the relevance to bulk water unclear. Here we demonstrate that femtosecond X-ray laser pulses can be used to probe the structure of liquid water in micrometre-sized droplets that have been evaporatively cooled below TH. We find experimental evidence for the existence of metastable bulk liquid water down to temperatures of 227(-1)(+2) kelvin in the previously largely unexplored no man's land. We observe a continuous and accelerating increase in structural ordering on supercooling to approximately 229 kelvin, where the number of droplets containing ice crystals increases rapidly. But a few droplets remain liquid for about a millisecond even at this temperature. The hope now is that these observations and our detailed structural data will help identify those theories that best describe and explain the behaviour of water.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sellberg, J A -- Huang, C -- McQueen, T A -- Loh, N D -- Laksmono, H -- Schlesinger, D -- Sierra, R G -- Nordlund, D -- Hampton, C Y -- Starodub, D -- DePonte, D P -- Beye, M -- Chen, C -- Martin, A V -- Barty, A -- Wikfeldt, K T -- Weiss, T M -- Caronna, C -- Feldkamp, J -- Skinner, L B -- Seibert, M M -- Messerschmidt, M -- Williams, G J -- Boutet, S -- Pettersson, L G M -- Bogan, M J -- Nilsson, A -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jun 19;510(7505):381-4. doi: 10.1038/nature13266.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA [2] Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. ; Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, PO Box 20450, Stanford, California 94309, USA. ; 1] SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA [2] Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. ; 1] Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, PO Box 20450, Stanford, California 94309, USA. ; 1] SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA [2] Institute for Methods and Instrumentation in Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Wilhelm-Conrad-Rontgen Campus, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin, Germany. ; Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, PO Box 20450, Stanford, California 94309, USA. ; Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, New York 11794-2100, USA. ; 1] SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA [2] Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden [3] Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, PO Box 20450, Stanford, California 94309, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24943953" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-07-23
    Description: G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal primarily through G proteins or arrestins. Arrestin binding to GPCRs blocks G protein interaction and redirects signalling to numerous G-protein-independent pathways. Here we report the crystal structure of a constitutively active form of human rhodopsin bound to a pre-activated form of the mouse visual arrestin, determined by serial femtosecond X-ray laser crystallography. Together with extensive biochemical and mutagenesis data, the structure reveals an overall architecture of the rhodopsin-arrestin assembly in which rhodopsin uses distinct structural elements, including transmembrane helix 7 and helix 8, to recruit arrestin. Correspondingly, arrestin adopts the pre-activated conformation, with a approximately 20 degrees rotation between the amino and carboxy domains, which opens up a cleft in arrestin to accommodate a short helix formed by the second intracellular loop of rhodopsin. This structure provides a basis for understanding GPCR-mediated arrestin-biased signalling and demonstrates the power of X-ray lasers for advancing the frontiers of structural biology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521999/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4521999/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Yanyong -- Zhou, X Edward -- Gao, Xiang -- He, Yuanzheng -- Liu, Wei -- Ishchenko, Andrii -- Barty, Anton -- White, Thomas A -- Yefanov, Oleksandr -- Han, Gye Won -- Xu, Qingping -- de Waal, Parker W -- Ke, Jiyuan -- Tan, M H Eileen -- Zhang, Chenghai -- Moeller, Arne -- West, Graham M -- Pascal, Bruce D -- Van Eps, Ned -- Caro, Lydia N -- Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A -- Lee, Regina J -- Suino-Powell, Kelly M -- Gu, Xin -- Pal, Kuntal -- Ma, Jinming -- Zhi, Xiaoyong -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Williams, Garth J -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Gati, Cornelius -- Zatsepin, Nadia A -- Wang, Dingjie -- James, Daniel -- Basu, Shibom -- Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi -- Conrad, Chelsie E -- Coe, Jesse -- Liu, Haiguang -- Lisova, Stella -- Kupitz, Christopher -- Grotjohann, Ingo -- Fromme, Raimund -- Jiang, Yi -- Tan, Minjia -- Yang, Huaiyu -- Li, Jun -- Wang, Meitian -- Zheng, Zhong -- Li, Dianfan -- Howe, Nicole -- Zhao, Yingming -- Standfuss, Jorg -- Diederichs, Kay -- Dong, Yuhui -- Potter, Clinton S -- Carragher, Bridget -- Caffrey, Martin -- Jiang, Hualiang -- Chapman, Henry N -- Spence, John C H -- Fromme, Petra -- Weierstall, Uwe -- Ernst, Oliver P -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Gurevich, Vsevolod V -- Griffin, Patrick R -- Hubbell, Wayne L -- Stevens, Raymond C -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Melcher, Karsten -- Xu, H Eric -- DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- EY005216/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- EY011500/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM077561/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM097463/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM102545/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM103310/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM104212/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM108635/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P30EY000331/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103310/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41GM103393/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41RR001209/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073210/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK066202/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY011500/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM087413/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM109955/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- S10 RR027270/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094586/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094599/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 30;523(7562):561-7. doi: 10.1038/nature14656. Epub 2015 Jul 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA. ; Department of Chemistry, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; Joint Center for Structural Genomics, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA [2] Department of Obstetrics &Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ; The National Resource for Automated Molecular Microscopy, New York Structural Biology Center, New York, New York 10027, USA. ; Department of Molecular Therapeutics, The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, Florida 33458, USA. ; Jules Stein Eye Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ; Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA [2] BioXFEL, NSF Science and Technology Center, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Haidian District, Beijing 10084, China. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Applied Structural Discovery, Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Department of Obstetrics &Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore. ; Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland. ; Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA. ; School of Medicine and School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland. ; 1] BioXFEL, NSF Science and Technology Center, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, New York 14203, USA [2] Ben May Department for Cancer Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA. ; Laboratory of Biomolecular Research at Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland. ; Department of Biology, Universitat Konstanz, 78457 Konstanz, Germany. ; Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China. ; 1] Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, 22761 Hamburg, Germany. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada [2] Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A8, Canada. ; 1] Department of Chemistry, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [2] Department of Biological Sciences, Bridge Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA [3] iHuman Institute, ShanghaiTech University, 2F Building 6, 99 Haike Road, Pudong New District, Shanghai 201210, China. ; 1] Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Center for Structural Biology and Drug Discovery, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49503, USA [2] VARI-SIMM Center, Center for Structure and Function of Drug Targets, CAS-Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201203, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26200343" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Arrestin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disulfides/chemistry/metabolism ; Humans ; Lasers ; Mice ; Models, Molecular ; Multiprotein Complexes/biosynthesis/chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Reproducibility of Results ; Rhodopsin/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; X-Rays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-07-22
    Description: Photosynthesis, a process catalysed by plants, algae and cyanobacteria converts sunlight to energy thus sustaining all higher life on Earth. Two large membrane protein complexes, photosystem I and II (PSI and PSII), act in series to catalyse the light-driven reactions in photosynthesis. PSII catalyses the light-driven water splitting process, which maintains the Earth's oxygenic atmosphere. In this process, the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII cycles through five states, S0 to S4, in which four electrons are sequentially extracted from the OEC in four light-driven charge-separation events. Here we describe time resolved experiments on PSII nano/microcrystals from Thermosynechococcus elongatus performed with the recently developed technique of serial femtosecond crystallography. Structures have been determined from PSII in the dark S1 state and after double laser excitation (putative S3 state) at 5 and 5.5 A resolution, respectively. The results provide evidence that PSII undergoes significant conformational changes at the electron acceptor side and at the Mn4CaO5 core of the OEC. These include an elongation of the metal cluster, accompanied by changes in the protein environment, which could allow for binding of the second substrate water molecule between the more distant protruding Mn (referred to as the 'dangler' Mn) and the Mn3CaOx cubane in the S2 to S3 transition, as predicted by spectroscopic and computational studies. This work shows the great potential for time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography for investigation of catalytic processes in biomolecules.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kupitz, Christopher -- Basu, Shibom -- Grotjohann, Ingo -- Fromme, Raimund -- Zatsepin, Nadia A -- Rendek, Kimberly N -- Hunter, Mark S -- Shoeman, Robert L -- White, Thomas A -- Wang, Dingjie -- James, Daniel -- Yang, Jay-How -- Cobb, Danielle E -- Reeder, Brenda -- Sierra, Raymond G -- Liu, Haiguang -- Barty, Anton -- Aquila, Andrew L -- Deponte, Daniel -- Kirian, Richard A -- Bari, Sadia -- Bergkamp, Jesse J -- Beyerlein, Kenneth R -- Bogan, Michael J -- Caleman, Carl -- Chao, Tzu-Chiao -- Conrad, Chelsie E -- Davis, Katherine M -- Fleckenstein, Holger -- Galli, Lorenzo -- Hau-Riege, Stefan P -- Kassemeyer, Stephan -- Laksmono, Hartawan -- Liang, Mengning -- Lomb, Lukas -- Marchesini, Stefano -- Martin, Andrew V -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Milathianaki, Despina -- Nass, Karol -- Ros, Alexandra -- Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi -- Schmidt, Kevin -- Seibert, Marvin -- Steinbrener, Jan -- Stellato, Francesco -- Yan, Lifen -- Yoon, Chunhong -- Moore, Thomas A -- Moore, Ana L -- Pushkar, Yulia -- Williams, Garth J -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Doak, R Bruce -- Weierstall, Uwe -- Frank, Matthias -- Chapman, Henry N -- Spence, John C H -- Fromme, Petra -- 1R01GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Sep 11;513(7517):261-5. doi: 10.1038/nature13453. Epub 2014 Jul 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2]. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA. ; Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA. ; Max-Planck-Institut fur medizinische Forschung, Jahnstrasse 29, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; Stanford PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] European XFEL GmbH, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; 1] Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA [2] Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; 1] Max Planck Advanced Study Group, Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] Max-Planck-Institut fur Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. ; 1] Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Regementsvagen 1, SE-752 37 Uppsala, Sweden. ; 1] Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA [2] University of Regina, 3737 Wascana Pkwy Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2, Canada. ; Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA. ; 1] Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg, Germany. ; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA. ; 1] Max-Planck-Institut fur medizinische Forschung, Jahnstrasse 29, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany [2] Max Planck Advanced Study Group, Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. ; 1] Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] Department ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, Department of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010, Australia. ; Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA. ; 1] Max-Planck-Institut fur medizinische Forschung, Jahnstrasse 29, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany [2] Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [3] University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg, Germany. ; 1] Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA [2] Uppsala University, Sankt Olofsgatan 10B, 753 12 Uppsala, Sweden. ; 1] Center for Free-Electron Laser Science, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany [2] University of Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg, Germany [3] Center for Ultrafast Imaging, Luruper Chaussee 149, 22761 Hamburg, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043005" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Crystallography, X-Ray ; Cyanobacteria/*chemistry ; *Models, Molecular ; Photosystem II Protein Complex/*chemistry ; Protein Structure, Tertiary
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-02-05
    Description: X-ray lasers offer new capabilities in understanding the structure of biological systems, complex materials and matter under extreme conditions. Very short and extremely bright, coherent X-ray pulses can be used to outrun key damage processes and obtain a single diffraction pattern from a large macromolecule, a virus or a cell before the sample explodes and turns into plasma. The continuous diffraction pattern of non-crystalline objects permits oversampling and direct phase retrieval. Here we show that high-quality diffraction data can be obtained with a single X-ray pulse from a non-crystalline biological sample, a single mimivirus particle, which was injected into the pulsed beam of a hard-X-ray free-electron laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source. Calculations indicate that the energy deposited into the virus by the pulse heated the particle to over 100,000 K after the pulse had left the sample. The reconstructed exit wavefront (image) yielded 32-nm full-period resolution in a single exposure and showed no measurable damage. The reconstruction indicates inhomogeneous arrangement of dense material inside the virion. We expect that significantly higher resolutions will be achieved in such experiments with shorter and brighter photon pulses focused to a smaller area. The resolution in such experiments can be further extended for samples available in multiple identical copies.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4038304/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4038304/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Seibert, M Marvin -- Ekeberg, Tomas -- Maia, Filipe R N C -- Svenda, Martin -- Andreasson, Jakob -- Jonsson, Olof -- Odic, Dusko -- Iwan, Bianca -- Rocker, Andrea -- Westphal, Daniel -- Hantke, Max -- DePonte, Daniel P -- Barty, Anton -- Schulz, Joachim -- Gumprecht, Lars -- Coppola, Nicola -- Aquila, Andrew -- Liang, Mengning -- White, Thomas A -- Martin, Andrew -- Caleman, Carl -- Stern, Stephan -- Abergel, Chantal -- Seltzer, Virginie -- Claverie, Jean-Michel -- Bostedt, Christoph -- Bozek, John D -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Miahnahri, A Alan -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Krzywinski, Jacek -- Williams, Garth -- Hodgson, Keith O -- Bogan, Michael J -- Hampton, Christina Y -- Sierra, Raymond G -- Starodub, Dmitri -- Andersson, Inger -- Bajt, Sasa -- Barthelmess, Miriam -- Spence, John C H -- Fromme, Petra -- Weierstall, Uwe -- Kirian, Richard -- Hunter, Mark -- Doak, R Bruce -- Marchesini, Stefano -- Hau-Riege, Stefan P -- Frank, Matthias -- Shoeman, Robert L -- Lomb, Lukas -- Epp, Sascha W -- Hartmann, Robert -- Rolles, Daniel -- Rudenko, Artem -- Schmidt, Carlo -- Foucar, Lutz -- Kimmel, Nils -- Holl, Peter -- Rudek, Benedikt -- Erk, Benjamin -- Homke, Andre -- Reich, Christian -- Pietschner, Daniel -- Weidenspointner, Georg -- Struder, Lothar -- Hauser, Gunter -- Gorke, Hubert -- Ullrich, Joachim -- Schlichting, Ilme -- Herrmann, Sven -- Schaller, Gerhard -- Schopper, Florian -- Soltau, Heike -- Kuhnel, Kai-Uwe -- Andritschke, Robert -- Schroter, Claus-Dieter -- Krasniqi, Faton -- Bott, Mario -- Schorb, Sebastian -- Rupp, Daniela -- Adolph, Marcus -- Gorkhover, Tais -- Hirsemann, Helmut -- Potdevin, Guillaume -- Graafsma, Heinz -- Nilsson, Bjorn -- Chapman, Henry N -- Hajdu, Janos -- R01 GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Feb 3;470(7332):78-81. doi: 10.1038/nature09748.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Uppsala University, Husargatan 3, SE-751 24 Uppsala, Sweden.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21293374" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Electrons ; Hot Temperature ; Lasers ; Mimiviridae/*chemistry ; Photons ; Time Factors ; X-Ray Diffraction/*instrumentation/*methods ; X-Rays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-11-26
    Description: The determination of protein crystal structures is hampered by the need for macroscopic crystals. X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) provide extremely intense pulses of femtosecond duration, which allow data collection from nanometre- to micrometre-sized crystals in a 'diffraction-before-destruction' approach. So far, all protein structure determinations carried out using FELs have been based on previous knowledge of related, known structures. Here we show that X-ray FEL data can be used for de novo protein structure determination, that is, without previous knowledge about the structure. Using the emerging technique of serial femtosecond crystallography, we performed single-wavelength anomalous scattering measurements on microcrystals of the well-established model system lysozyme, in complex with a lanthanide compound. Using Monte-Carlo integration, we obtained high-quality diffraction intensities from which experimental phases could be determined, resulting in an experimental electron density map good enough for automated building of the protein structure. This demonstrates the feasibility of determining novel protein structures using FELs. We anticipate that serial femtosecond crystallography will become an important tool for the structure determination of proteins that are difficult to crystallize, such as membrane proteins.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Barends, Thomas R M -- Foucar, Lutz -- Botha, Sabine -- Doak, R Bruce -- Shoeman, Robert L -- Nass, Karol -- Koglin, Jason E -- Williams, Garth J -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Schlichting, Ilme -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jan 9;505(7482):244-7. doi: 10.1038/nature12773. Epub 2013 Nov 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Max-Planck Institute for Medical Research, Jahnstrasse 29, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany. ; 1] Max-Planck Institute for Medical Research, Jahnstrasse 29, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany [2] Department of Physics, Arizona State University, PO Box 871504, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1504, USA. ; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24270807" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Chickens ; Crystallization ; Crystallography/*methods ; *Electrons ; Female ; Gadolinium ; *Lasers ; Membrane Proteins/chemistry ; Models, Molecular ; Monte Carlo Method ; Muramidase/chemistry ; Protein Conformation ; Proteins/*chemistry ; Time Factors ; X-Ray Diffraction/*methods ; *X-Rays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-09-10
    Description: The protein alpha-synuclein is the main component of Lewy bodies, the neuron-associated aggregates seen in Parkinson disease and other neurodegenerative pathologies. An 11-residue segment, which we term NACore, appears to be responsible for amyloid formation and cytotoxicity of human alpha-synuclein. Here we describe crystals of NACore that have dimensions smaller than the wavelength of visible light and thus are invisible by optical microscopy. As the crystals are thousands of times too small for structure determination by synchrotron X-ray diffraction, we use micro-electron diffraction to determine the structure at atomic resolution. The 1.4 A resolution structure demonstrates that this method can determine previously unknown protein structures and here yields, to our knowledge, the highest resolution achieved by any cryo-electron microscopy method to date. The structure exhibits protofibrils built of pairs of face-to-face beta-sheets. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns show the similarity of NACore to toxic fibrils of full-length alpha-synuclein. The NACore structure, together with that of a second segment, inspires a model for most of the ordered portion of the toxic, full-length alpha-synuclein fibril, presenting opportunities for the design of inhibitors of alpha-synuclein fibrils.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Rodriguez, Jose A -- Ivanova, Magdalena I -- Sawaya, Michael R -- Cascio, Duilio -- Reyes, Francis E -- Shi, Dan -- Sangwan, Smriti -- Guenther, Elizabeth L -- Johnson, Lisa M -- Zhang, Meng -- Jiang, Lin -- Arbing, Mark A -- Nannenga, Brent L -- Hattne, Johan -- Whitelegge, Julian -- Brewster, Aaron S -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Sauter, Nicholas K -- Gonen, Tamir -- Eisenberg, David S -- 1R01-AG029430/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- AG016570/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- GM095887/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM102520/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103403/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM095887/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM102520/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Sep 24;525(7570):486-90. doi: 10.1038/nature15368. Epub 2015 Sep 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Howard Hughes Medical Institute, UCLA-DOE Institute, Departments of Biological Chemistry and Chemistry and Biochemistry, Box 951570, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095-1570, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Janelia Research Campus, 19700 Helix Drive, Ashburn, Virginia 20147, USA. ; Box 42, NPI-Semel Institute, 760 Westwood Plaza, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90024, USA. ; Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. ; Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26352473" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amyloid/chemistry ; Cryoelectron Microscopy ; Electrons ; Humans ; Lewy Bodies/chemistry ; Models, Molecular ; Nanoparticles/*chemistry/*toxicity ; Parkinson Disease ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Scattering, Radiation ; alpha-Synuclein/*chemistry/*toxicity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2012-06-02
    Description: Structure determination of proteins and other macromolecules has historically required the growth of high-quality crystals sufficiently large to diffract x-rays efficiently while withstanding radiation damage. We applied serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain high-resolution structural information from microcrystals (less than 1 micrometer by 1 micrometer by 3 micrometers) of the well-characterized model protein lysozyme. The agreement with synchrotron data demonstrates the immediate relevance of SFX for analyzing the structure of the large group of difficult-to-crystallize molecules.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3788707/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3788707/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Boutet, Sebastien -- Lomb, Lukas -- Williams, Garth J -- Barends, Thomas R M -- Aquila, Andrew -- Doak, R Bruce -- Weierstall, Uwe -- DePonte, Daniel P -- Steinbrener, Jan -- Shoeman, Robert L -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Barty, Anton -- White, Thomas A -- Kassemeyer, Stephan -- Kirian, Richard A -- Seibert, M Marvin -- Montanez, Paul A -- Kenney, Chris -- Herbst, Ryan -- Hart, Philip -- Pines, Jack -- Haller, Gunther -- Gruner, Sol M -- Philipp, Hugh T -- Tate, Mark W -- Hromalik, Marianne -- Koerner, Lucas J -- van Bakel, Niels -- Morse, John -- Ghonsalves, Wilfred -- Arnlund, David -- Bogan, Michael J -- Caleman, Carl -- Fromme, Raimund -- Hampton, Christina Y -- Hunter, Mark S -- Johansson, Linda C -- Katona, Gergely -- Kupitz, Christopher -- Liang, Mengning -- Martin, Andrew V -- Nass, Karol -- Redecke, Lars -- Stellato, Francesco -- Timneanu, Nicusor -- Wang, Dingjie -- Zatsepin, Nadia A -- Schafer, Donald -- Defever, James -- Neutze, Richard -- Fromme, Petra -- Spence, John C H -- Chapman, Henry N -- Schlichting, Ilme -- 1R01GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jul 20;337(6092):362-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1217737. Epub 2012 May 31.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA. sboutet@slac.stanford.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22653729" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Crystallography, X-Ray/*methods ; Lasers ; Muramidase/chemistry/radiation effects ; *Protein Conformation
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-12-06
    Description: Serial femtosecond crystallography using ultrashort pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) enables studies of the light-triggered dynamics of biomolecules. We used microcrystals of photoactive yellow protein (a bacterial blue light photoreceptor) as a model system and obtained high-resolution, time-resolved difference electron density maps of excellent quality with strong features; these allowed the determination of structures of reaction intermediates to a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. Our results open the way to the study of reversible and nonreversible biological reactions on time scales as short as femtoseconds under conditions that maximize the extent of reaction initiation throughout the crystal.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4361027/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4361027/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tenboer, Jason -- Basu, Shibom -- Zatsepin, Nadia -- Pande, Kanupriya -- Milathianaki, Despina -- Frank, Matthias -- Hunter, Mark -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Williams, Garth J -- Koglin, Jason E -- Oberthuer, Dominik -- Heymann, Michael -- Kupitz, Christopher -- Conrad, Chelsie -- Coe, Jesse -- Roy-Chowdhury, Shatabdi -- Weierstall, Uwe -- James, Daniel -- Wang, Dingjie -- Grant, Thomas -- Barty, Anton -- Yefanov, Oleksandr -- Scales, Jennifer -- Gati, Cornelius -- Seuring, Carolin -- Srajer, Vukica -- Henning, Robert -- Schwander, Peter -- Fromme, Raimund -- Ourmazd, Abbas -- Moffat, Keith -- Van Thor, Jasper J -- Spence, John C H -- Fromme, Petra -- Chapman, Henry N -- Schmidt, Marius -- P41 GM103543/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01GM095583/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R24 GM111072/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R24GM111072/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Dec 5;346(6214):1242-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1259357.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53211, USA. ; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA. ; Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287, USA. ; Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA. ; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550, USA. ; Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg, Germany. ; Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; Hauptman-Woodward Institute, State University of New York at Buffalo, 700 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, NY 14203, USA. ; Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, University of Hamburg, 22761 Hamburg, Germany. Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg, Germany. ; Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. ; Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. ; Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53211, USA. m-schmidt@uwm.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25477465" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Bacterial Proteins/chemistry/*ultrastructure ; Crystallography, X-Ray/*methods ; Photoreceptors, Microbial/chemistry/*ultrastructure ; Protein Conformation ; Time Factors
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-02-16
    Description: Intense femtosecond x-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD-XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3732582/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3732582/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kern, Jan -- Alonso-Mori, Roberto -- Tran, Rosalie -- Hattne, Johan -- Gildea, Richard J -- Echols, Nathaniel -- Glockner, Carina -- Hellmich, Julia -- Laksmono, Hartawan -- Sierra, Raymond G -- Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt -- Koroidov, Sergey -- Lampe, Alyssa -- Han, Guangye -- Gul, Sheraz -- Difiore, Dorte -- Milathianaki, Despina -- Fry, Alan R -- Miahnahri, Alan -- Schafer, Donald W -- Messerschmidt, Marc -- Seibert, M Marvin -- Koglin, Jason E -- Sokaras, Dimosthenis -- Weng, Tsu-Chien -- Sellberg, Jonas -- Latimer, Matthew J -- Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W -- Zwart, Petrus H -- White, William E -- Glatzel, Pieter -- Adams, Paul D -- Bogan, Michael J -- Williams, Garth J -- Boutet, Sebastien -- Messinger, Johannes -- Zouni, Athina -- Sauter, Nicholas K -- Yachandra, Vittal K -- Bergmann, Uwe -- Yano, Junko -- GM095887/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM102520/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P01 GM063210/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P41GM103393/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM055302/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM095887/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM102520/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Apr 26;340(6131):491-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1234273. Epub 2013 Feb 14.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23413188" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Crystallography, X-Ray/methods ; Cyanobacteria/enzymology ; Electrons ; Light ; Manganese Compounds/*chemistry ; Oxidation-Reduction ; Oxides/*chemistry ; Photosystem II Protein Complex/*chemistry/radiation effects ; Protein Conformation ; Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission/methods ; Temperature ; Water/chemistry ; X-Ray Diffraction/methods
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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