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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-09-03
    Description: The corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) critically controls behavioral adaptation to stress and is causally linked to emotional disorders. Using neurochemical and genetic tools, we determined that CRHR1 is expressed in forebrain glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid-containing (GABAergic) neurons as well as in midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Via specific CRHR1 deletions in glutamatergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic cells, we found that the lack of CRHR1 in forebrain glutamatergic circuits reduces anxiety and impairs neurotransmission in the amygdala and hippocampus. Selective deletion of CRHR1 in midbrain dopaminergic neurons increases anxiety-like behavior and reduces dopamine release in the prefrontal cortex. These results define a bidirectional model for the role of CRHR1 in anxiety and suggest that an imbalance between CRHR1-controlled anxiogenic glutamatergic and anxiolytic dopaminergic systems might lead to emotional disorders.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Refojo, Damian -- Schweizer, Martin -- Kuehne, Claudia -- Ehrenberg, Stefanie -- Thoeringer, Christoph -- Vogl, Annette M -- Dedic, Nina -- Schumacher, Marion -- von Wolff, Gregor -- Avrabos, Charilaos -- Touma, Chadi -- Engblom, David -- Schutz, Gunther -- Nave, Klaus-Armin -- Eder, Matthias -- Wotjak, Carsten T -- Sillaber, Inge -- Holsboer, Florian -- Wurst, Wolfgang -- Deussing, Jan M -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Sep 30;333(6051):1903-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1202107. Epub 2011 Sep 1.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21885734" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amygdala/metabolism ; Animals ; *Anxiety ; Behavior, Animal ; Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone/metabolism ; Dopamine/*metabolism ; Fear ; Glutamic Acid/*metabolism ; Hippocampus/metabolism ; Male ; Memory ; Mesencephalon ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; Motor Activity ; Neurons/*metabolism ; Prefrontal Cortex/metabolism ; Prosencephalon/cytology/metabolism ; Receptors, Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone/antagonists & ; inhibitors/genetics/*metabolism ; Synaptic Transmission ; Ventral Tegmental Area/metabolism ; gamma-Aminobutyric Acid/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Keywords: brain ; hormone ; BEHAVIOR ; MICE LACKING ; CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING-FACTOR ; ANXIETY ; CRF ; FACTOR RECEPTOR 1-DEFICIENT ; I-H ; IMPAIRED STRESS-RESPONSE
    Abstract: The corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) critically controls behavioral adaptation to stress and is causally linked to emotional disorders. Using neurochemical and genetic tools, we determined that CRHR1 is expressed in forebrain glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid-containing (GABAergic) neurons as well as in midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Via specific CRHR1 deletions in glutamatergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, and serotonergic cells, we found that the lack of CRHR1 in forebrain glutamatergic circuits reduces anxiety and impairs neurotransmission in the amygdala and hippocampus. Selective deletion of CRHR1 in midbrain dopaminergic neurons increases anxiety-like behavior and reduces dopamine release in the prefrontal cortex. These results define a bidirectional model for the role of CRHR1 in anxiety and suggest that an imbalance between CRHR1-controlled anxiogenic glutamatergic and anxiolytic dopaminergic systems might lead to emotional disorders.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21885734
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK; Malden, USA : Blackwell Science Ltd
    Journal of fish biology 67 (2005), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1095-8649
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Two small demersal fishes, the sand goby Pomatoschistus minutus and the common goby Pomatoschistus microps, were quantified on soft bottoms at 20–40 m depth in the Baltic Sea, using a camera placed above the bottom. The largest numbers of gobies were seen following the settlement of young in late summer and autumn. Most recorded fishes were sand gobies. An annual average of 4·7 individuals m−2(0·24 g dry mass m−2) was recorded in 1983–1985 and 2·5 individuals m−2(0·13 g m−2) in 1997–1998. Using these densities, the annual goby food consumption was estimated to 100 kJ m−2 in 1983–1985 and 50 kJ m−2 in 1997–1998, corresponding to most of the annual macrobenthos production available to the gobies. The resulting goby production, assumed equal to 25% of the food consumed, must have been an important food source for the larger fishes occasionally recorded in the photographs.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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