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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2016-04-14
    Description: Bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs) form a network of blood vessels that regulate both leukocyte trafficking and haematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) maintenance. However, it is not clear how BMECs balance these dual roles, and whether these events occur at the same vascular site. We found that mammalian bone marrow stem cell maintenance and leukocyte trafficking are regulated by distinct blood vessel types with different permeability properties. Less permeable arterial blood vessels maintain haematopoietic stem cells in a low reactive oxygen species (ROS) state, whereas the more permeable sinusoids promote HSPC activation and are the exclusive site for immature and mature leukocyte trafficking to and from the bone marrow. A functional consequence of high permeability of blood vessels is that exposure to blood plasma increases bone marrow HSPC ROS levels, augmenting their migration and differentiation, while compromising their long-term repopulation and survival. These findings may have relevance for clinical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and mobilization protocols.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Itkin, Tomer -- Gur-Cohen, Shiri -- Spencer, Joel A -- Schajnovitz, Amir -- Ramasamy, Saravana K -- Kusumbe, Anjali P -- Ledergor, Guy -- Jung, Yookyung -- Milo, Idan -- Poulos, Michael G -- Kalinkovich, Alexander -- Ludin, Aya -- Kollet, Orit -- Shakhar, Guy -- Butler, Jason M -- Rafii, Shahin -- Adams, Ralf H -- Scadden, David T -- Lin, Charles P -- Lapidot, Tsvee -- EB017274/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- HL100402/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 EB017274/EB/NIBIB NIH HHS/ -- U01 HL100402/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Apr 21;532(7599):323-8. doi: 10.1038/nature17624. Epub 2016 Apr 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Immunology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel. ; Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; Center for Systems Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. ; Harvard Stem Cell Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; Center for Regenerative Medicine and Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Department of Tissue Morphogenesis and Faculty of Medicine, University of Munster, D-48149 Munster, Germany. ; Internal Medicine Department, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv 64239, Israel. ; Department of Genetic Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10065, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27074509" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigens, Ly/metabolism ; Arteries/cytology/physiology ; Blood Vessels/*cytology/*physiology ; Bone Marrow/*blood supply ; Bone Marrow Cells/cytology ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Movement ; Cell Self Renewal ; Cell Survival ; Chemokine CXCL12/metabolism ; Endothelial Cells/physiology ; Female ; *Hematopoiesis ; Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization ; Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation ; Hematopoietic Stem Cells/cytology ; Leukocytes/cytology ; Male ; Membrane Proteins/metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Nestin/metabolism ; Pericytes/physiology ; Permeability ; Plasma/metabolism ; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism ; Receptors, CXCR4/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2016-04-14
    Description: Blood vessels define local microenvironments in the skeletal system, play crucial roles in osteogenesis and provide niches for haematopoietic stem cells. The properties of niche-forming vessels and their changes in the ageing organism remain incompletely understood. Here we show that Notch signalling in endothelial cells leads to the expansion of haematopoietic stem cell niches in bone, which involves increases in CD31-positive capillaries and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFRbeta)-positive perivascular cells, arteriole formation and elevated levels of cellular stem cell factor. Although endothelial hypoxia-inducible factor signalling promotes some of these changes, it fails to enhance vascular niche function because of a lack of arterialization and expansion of PDGFRbeta-positive cells. In ageing mice, niche-forming vessels in the skeletal system are strongly reduced but can be restored by activation of endothelial Notch signalling. These findings indicate that vascular niches for haematopoietic stem cells are part of complex, age-dependent microenvironments involving multiple cell populations and vessel subtypes.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kusumbe, Anjali P -- Ramasamy, Saravana K -- Itkin, Tomer -- Mae, Maarja Andaloussi -- Langen, Urs H -- Betsholtz, Christer -- Lapidot, Tsvee -- Adams, Ralf H -- England -- Nature. 2016 Apr 21;532(7599):380-4. doi: 10.1038/nature17638. Epub 2016 Apr 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Max-Planck-Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Department of Tissue Morphogenesis, and University of Munster, Faculty of Medicine, D-48149 Munster, Germany. ; Department of Immunology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100, Israel. ; Vascular Biology Program, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. ; Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Division of Vascular Biology, Karolinska Institute, Scheeles vag 2, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27074508" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/*physiology ; Animals ; Antigens, CD31/metabolism ; Arterioles/cytology/*physiology ; Bone and Bones/*blood supply/cytology/metabolism ; Capillaries/cytology/*physiology ; Cell Count ; Endothelial Cells/metabolism ; Hematopoietic Stem Cells/*cytology ; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Osteogenesis ; Receptor, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor beta/metabolism ; Receptors, Notch/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Stem Cell Factor/metabolism ; *Stem Cell Niche
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-03-22
    Description: Blood vessel growth in the skeletal system and osteogenesis seem to be coupled, suggesting the existence of molecular crosstalk between endothelial and osteoblastic cells. Understanding the nature of the mechanisms linking angiogenesis and bone formation should be of great relevance for improved fracture healing or prevention of bone mass loss. Here we show that vascular growth in bone involves a specialized, tissue-specific form of angiogenesis. Notch signalling promotes endothelial cell proliferation and vessel growth in postnatal long bone, which is the opposite of the well-established function of Notch and its ligand Dll4 in the endothelium of other organs and tumours. Endothelial-cell-specific and inducible genetic disruption of Notch signalling in mice not only impaired bone vessel morphology and growth, but also led to reduced osteogenesis, shortening of long bones, chondrocyte defects, loss of trabeculae and decreased bone mass. On the basis of a series of genetic experiments, we conclude that skeletal defects in these mutants involved defective angiocrine release of Noggin from endothelial cells, which is positively regulated by Notch. Administration of recombinant Noggin, a secreted antagonist of bone morphogenetic proteins, restored bone growth and mineralization, chondrocyte maturation, the formation of trabeculae and osteoprogenitor numbers in endothelial-cell-specific Notch pathway mutants. These findings establish a molecular framework coupling angiogenesis, angiocrine signals and osteogenesis, which may prove significant for the development of future therapeutic applications.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ramasamy, Saravana K -- Kusumbe, Anjali P -- Wang, Lin -- Adams, Ralf H -- England -- Nature. 2014 Mar 20;507(7492):376-80. doi: 10.1038/nature13146. Epub 2014 Mar 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Department of Tissue Morphogenesis, D-48149 Munster, Germany [2]. ; Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Department of Tissue Morphogenesis, D-48149 Munster, Germany. ; 1] Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Department of Tissue Morphogenesis, D-48149 Munster, Germany [2] University of Munster, Faculty of Medicine, D-48149 Munster, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24647000" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Animals, Newborn ; Blood Vessels/growth & development ; Bone Development/drug effects ; Bone and Bones/*blood supply/cytology/drug effects/*metabolism ; Calcification, Physiologic/drug effects ; Carrier Proteins/administration & dosage/metabolism/pharmacology ; Cell Proliferation ; Chondrocytes/cytology/drug effects ; Endothelium, Vascular/cytology/*metabolism ; Female ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; *Neovascularization, Physiologic ; *Osteogenesis/drug effects ; Receptors, Notch/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-03-22
    Description: The mammalian skeletal system harbours a hierarchical system of mesenchymal stem cells, osteoprogenitors and osteoblasts sustaining lifelong bone formation. Osteogenesis is indispensable for the homeostatic renewal of bone as well as regenerative fracture healing, but these processes frequently decline in ageing organisms, leading to loss of bone mass and increased fracture incidence. Evidence indicates that the growth of blood vessels in bone and osteogenesis are coupled, but relatively little is known about the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Here we identify a new capillary subtype in the murine skeletal system with distinct morphological, molecular and functional properties. These vessels are found in specific locations, mediate growth of the bone vasculature, generate distinct metabolic and molecular microenvironments, maintain perivascular osteoprogenitors and couple angiogenesis to osteogenesis. The abundance of these vessels and associated osteoprogenitors was strongly reduced in bone from aged animals, and pharmacological reversal of this decline allowed the restoration of bone mass.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kusumbe, Anjali P -- Ramasamy, Saravana K -- Adams, Ralf H -- England -- Nature. 2014 Mar 20;507(7492):323-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13145. Epub 2014 Mar 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Department of Tissue Morphogenesis, D-48149 Munster, Germany [2]. ; 1] Max Planck Institute for Molecular Biomedicine, Department of Tissue Morphogenesis, D-48149 Munster, Germany [2] University of Munster, Faculty of Medicine, D-48149 Munster, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24646994" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/metabolism/pathology ; Animals ; Blood Vessels/anatomy & histology/cytology/growth & development/*physiology ; Bone and Bones/*blood supply/cytology ; Endothelial Cells/metabolism ; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Neovascularization, Physiologic/*physiology ; Osteoblasts/cytology/metabolism ; Osteogenesis/*physiology ; Oxygen/metabolism ; Stem Cells/cytology/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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