Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-11-06
    Description: Background/Aim: High-carbohydrate diets are generally provided to post-pancreatectomy cancer patients. Low energy density of this diet may obstruct proper energy intake and recovery. This study aimed to assess the effects of high-fat, high-energy ketogenic diet (KD) in these patients. Patients and Methods: After pancreatectomy, 9 patients were provided with general diet (GD) while 10 were served KD. Meal compliance, energy intake rate, meal satisfaction and presence of complications were monitored throughout hospital stay. Data on nutritional status, serum lipids and body composition were collected and compared between groups. Results: Meal compliance, energy intake rate and meal satisfaction score were higher in KD. There were no differences in complications, nutritional status and serum lipids. The decrease in body cell mass (BCM) was greater in GD. Conclusion: Post-pancreatectomy cancer patients who consumed KD had a higher energy intake and BCM. These results suggest the potential use of KD as an adjuvant anti-cancer therapy.
    Print ISSN: 0250-7005
    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-06-02
    Description: Quinacrine (QNC), antiprotozoan drug commonly used against Malaria and Giardiasis , has been recently tried for rheumatics and prion diseases via drug repositioning. In addition, several reports suggest antitumor effects of QNC through suppression of NF-B and activation of p53. This study demonstrates the anticancer effect of QNC via a novel pathway through the elimination of checkpoint kinase 1/2 (Chk1/2) under p53-inactivated conditions. Inhibition of p53 by PFT-α or siRNA promotes QNC-induced apoptosis in normal fibroblast and p53-intact cancer cells. Considering that Chk1/2 kinases exert an essential role in the control of cell cycle, inhibition of Chk1/2 by QNC may induce cell death via uncontrolled cell cycle progression. Indeed, QNC reduces Chk1/2 expression under p53-impaired cancer cells and induces cell death in the G 2 –M phase. QNC increases the binding between p-Chk1/2 and β-TrCP and promotes proteasome-dependent degradation. Moreover, QNC treatment displayed antitumor effects in a Villin-Cre;p53 +/LSL-R172H intestinal cancer mouse model system as well as HCT116 p53 –/– xenografts. Implications: QNC has been used for the past over 70 years without obvious side effects, as such it is a plausible drug candidate for relapsed cancers, small-cell lung cancer, breast cancer as well as various p53-inactivated human malignancies. Mol Cancer Res; 16(6); 935–46. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1541-7786
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3125
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-06-27
    Description: Although guidelines recommend amikacin (AMK) inhalation therapy for difficult-to-treat nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease (NTM-LD), data are limited regarding the safety and clinical efficacy of this salvage therapy. We retrospectively evaluated the treatment outcomes of 77 patients with refractory NTM-LD caused by Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABC) or M. avium complex (MAC) who initiated AMK inhalation therapy between February 2015 and June 2016. MABC was the most common etiology ( n = 48, 62%), followed by MAC ( n = 20, 26%) and mixed infections ( n = 9, 12%). Isolates with macrolide resistance and baseline AMK resistance were identified in 63 (82%) patients and 5 (6%) patients, respectively. At 12 months after AMK inhalation therapy, 49% of patients had symptomatic improvement, whereas 42% had radiological improvement. Conversion to a negative sputum culture occurred in 14 (18%) patients, and the culture conversion rate was higher in patients infected with macrolide-susceptible isolates (7/14, 50%) than in those infected with macrolide-resistant isolates (7/63, 11%) ( P = 0.003). Significant decreases in sputum semiquantitative culture positivity occurred after AMK inhalation therapy ( P 〈 0.001). On multivariate analysis, conversion to a negative sputum culture was associated with mixed infections ( P = 0.009), a forced expiratory volume in 1 s of greater than 60% ( P = 0.008), and the absence of macrolide resistance ( P = 0.003). Thirty-eight percent of patients experienced adverse effects, with ototoxicity ( n = 15) being the most common. AMK inhalation salvage therapy may improve the treatment responses in some patients with refractory NTM-LD. However, considering the common adverse effects, further evaluation of the optimal dosage and intervals for AMK inhalation therapy is needed.
    Print ISSN: 0066-4804
    Electronic ISSN: 1098-6596
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2012-10-05
    Description: Grain boundaries in graphene are formed by the joining of islands during the initial growth stage, and these boundaries govern transport properties and related device performance. Although information on the atomic rearrangement at graphene grain boundaries can be obtained using transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy, large-scale information regarding the distribution of graphene grain boundaries is not easily accessible. Here we use optical microscopy to observe the grain boundaries of large-area graphene (grown on copper foil) directly, without transfer of the graphene. This imaging technique was realized by selectively oxidizing the underlying copper foil through graphene grain boundaries functionalized with O and OH radicals generated by ultraviolet irradiation under moisture-rich ambient conditions: selective diffusion of oxygen radicals through OH-functionalized defect sites was demonstrated by density functional calculations. The sheet resistance of large-area graphene decreased as the graphene grain sizes increased, but no strong correlation with the grain size of the copper was revealed, in contrast to a previous report. Furthermore, the influence of graphene grain boundaries on crack propagation (initialized by bending) and termination was clearly visualized using our technique. Our approach can be used as a simple protocol for evaluating the grain boundaries of other two-dimensional layered structures, such as boron nitride and exfoliated clays.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Duong, Dinh Loc -- Han, Gang Hee -- Lee, Seung Mi -- Gunes, Fethullah -- Kim, Eun Sung -- Kim, Sung Tae -- Kim, Heetae -- Ta, Quang Huy -- So, Kang Pyo -- Yoon, Seok Jun -- Chae, Seung Jin -- Jo, Young Woo -- Park, Min Ho -- Chae, Sang Hoon -- Lim, Seong Chu -- Choi, Jae Young -- Lee, Young Hee -- England -- Nature. 2012 Oct 11;490(7419):235-9. doi: 10.1038/nature11562. Epub 2012 Oct 3.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, South Korea.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23034653" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2013-08-21
    Description: Mammals harbour a complex gut microbiome, comprising bacteria that confer immunological, metabolic and neurological benefits. Despite advances in sequence-based microbial profiling and myriad studies defining microbiome composition during health and disease, little is known about the molecular processes used by symbiotic bacteria to stably colonize the gastrointestinal tract. We sought to define how mammals assemble and maintain the Bacteroides, one of the most numerically prominent genera of the human microbiome. Here we find that, whereas the gut normally contains hundreds of bacterial species, germ-free mice mono-associated with a single Bacteroides species are resistant to colonization by the same, but not different, species. To identify bacterial mechanisms for species-specific saturable colonization, we devised an in vivo genetic screen and discovered a unique class of polysaccharide utilization loci that is conserved among intestinal Bacteroides. We named this genetic locus the commensal colonization factors (ccf). Deletion of the ccf genes in the model symbiont, Bacteroides fragilis, results in colonization defects in mice and reduced horizontal transmission. The ccf genes of B. fragilis are upregulated during gut colonization, preferentially at the colonic surface. When we visualize microbial biogeography within the colon, B. fragilis penetrates the colonic mucus and resides deep within crypt channels, whereas ccf mutants are defective in crypt association. Notably, the CCF system is required for B. fragilis colonization following microbiome disruption with Citrobacter rodentium infection or antibiotic treatment, suggesting that the niche within colonic crypts represents a reservoir for bacteria to maintain long-term colonization. These findings reveal that intestinal Bacteroides have evolved species-specific physical interactions with the host that mediate stable and resilient gut colonization, and the CCF system represents a novel molecular mechanism for symbiosis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3893107/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3893107/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lee, S Melanie -- Donaldson, Gregory P -- Mikulski, Zbigniew -- Boyajian, Silva -- Ley, Klaus -- Mazmanian, Sarkis K -- DK078938/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- GM007616/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM099535/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P01 DK091222/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK078938/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM099535/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R21 DK083633/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Sep 19;501(7467):426-9. doi: 10.1038/nature12447. Epub 2013 Aug 18.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23955152" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Bacterial Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Bacteroides/*classification/genetics/growth & development/*physiology ; Bacteroides fragilis/genetics/growth & development/metabolism ; Colon/microbiology ; Conserved Sequence/genetics ; Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Gastrointestinal Tract/*microbiology ; Gene Deletion ; Genes, Bacterial/genetics ; Germ-Free Life ; Intestinal Mucosa/microbiology ; Male ; Metagenome/*physiology ; Mice ; Polysaccharides/metabolism ; Species Specificity ; Symbiosis/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-10-11
    Description: Spatial and temporal dissection of the genomic changes occurring during the evolution of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may help elucidate the basis for its dismal prognosis. We sequenced 25 spatially distinct regions from seven operable NSCLCs and found evidence of branched evolution, with driver mutations arising before and after subclonal diversification. There was pronounced intratumor heterogeneity in copy number alterations, translocations, and mutations associated with APOBEC cytidine deaminase activity. Despite maintained carcinogen exposure, tumors from smokers showed a relative decrease in smoking-related mutations over time, accompanied by an increase in APOBEC-associated mutations. In tumors from former smokers, genome-doubling occurred within a smoking-signature context before subclonal diversification, which suggested that a long period of tumor latency had preceded clinical detection. The regionally separated driver mutations, coupled with the relentless and heterogeneous nature of the genome instability processes, are likely to confound treatment success in NSCLC.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636050/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636050/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉de Bruin, Elza C -- McGranahan, Nicholas -- Mitter, Richard -- Salm, Max -- Wedge, David C -- Yates, Lucy -- Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam -- Shafi, Seema -- Murugaesu, Nirupa -- Rowan, Andrew J -- Gronroos, Eva -- Muhammad, Madiha A -- Horswell, Stuart -- Gerlinger, Marco -- Varela, Ignacio -- Jones, David -- Marshall, John -- Voet, Thierry -- Van Loo, Peter -- Rassl, Doris M -- Rintoul, Robert C -- Janes, Sam M -- Lee, Siow-Ming -- Forster, Martin -- Ahmad, Tanya -- Lawrence, David -- Falzon, Mary -- Capitanio, Arrigo -- Harkins, Timothy T -- Lee, Clarence C -- Tom, Warren -- Teefe, Enock -- Chen, Shann-Ching -- Begum, Sharmin -- Rabinowitz, Adam -- Phillimore, Benjamin -- Spencer-Dene, Bradley -- Stamp, Gordon -- Szallasi, Zoltan -- Matthews, Nik -- Stewart, Aengus -- Campbell, Peter -- Swanton, Charles -- 088340/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 091730/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 105104/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- A11590/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A17786/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A19310/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- A4688/Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Cancer Research UK/United Kingdom -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Oct 10;346(6206):251-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1253462.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cancer Research UK Lung Cancer Centre of Excellence, University College London Cancer Institute, London WC1E 6BT, UK. ; Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, London WC2A 3LY, UK. Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Science and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK. ; Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, London WC2A 3LY, UK. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK. University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1TN, UK. ; Instituto de Biomedicina y Biotecnologia de Cantabria (CSIC-UC-Sodercan), Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander, Spain. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, CB10 1SA, UK. Department of Human Genetics, University of Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. ; Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge CB23 3RE, UK. ; Lungs for Living Research Centre, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK. ; Cancer Research UK Lung Cancer Centre of Excellence, University College London Cancer Institute, London WC1E 6BT, UK. University College London Hospitals, London NW1 2BU, UK. ; University College London Hospitals, London NW1 2BU, UK. ; Thermo Fisher Scientific, Carlsbad, CA 92008, USA. ; Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kongens Lyngby, Denmark. Children's Hospital Informatics Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Cancer Research UK Lung Cancer Centre of Excellence, University College London Cancer Institute, London WC1E 6BT, UK. Cancer Research UK London Research Institute, London WC2A 3LY, UK. charles.swanton@cancer.org.uk.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25301630" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Carcinogens/toxicity ; Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/chemically induced/*diagnosis/*genetics ; Cytidine Deaminase/genetics ; Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Dosage ; *Genetic Heterogeneity ; *Genomic Instability ; Humans ; Lung Neoplasms/chemically induced/*diagnosis/*genetics ; Mutation ; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/genetics ; Prognosis ; Smoking/adverse effects ; Translocation, Genetic ; Tumor Cells, Cultured
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2016-01-19
    Description: Many procedures in modern clinical medicine rely on the use of electronic implants in treating conditions that range from acute coronary events to traumatic injury. However, standard permanent electronic hardware acts as a nidus for infection: bacteria form biofilms along percutaneous wires, or seed haematogenously, with the potential to migrate within the body and to provoke immune-mediated pathological tissue reactions. The associated surgical retrieval procedures, meanwhile, subject patients to the distress associated with re-operation and expose them to additional complications. Here, we report materials, device architectures, integration strategies, and in vivo demonstrations in rats of implantable, multifunctional silicon sensors for the brain, for which all of the constituent materials naturally resorb via hydrolysis and/or metabolic action, eliminating the need for extraction. Continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure and temperature illustrates functionality essential to the treatment of traumatic brain injury; the measurement performance of our resorbable devices compares favourably with that of non-resorbable clinical standards. In our experiments, insulated percutaneous wires connect to an externally mounted, miniaturized wireless potentiostat for data transmission. In a separate set-up, we connect a sensor to an implanted (but only partially resorbable) data-communication system, proving the principle that there is no need for any percutaneous wiring. The devices can be adapted to sense fluid flow, motion, pH or thermal characteristics, in formats that are compatible with the body's abdomen and extremities, as well as the deep brain, suggesting that the sensors might meet many needs in clinical medicine.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kang, Seung-Kyun -- Murphy, Rory K J -- Hwang, Suk-Won -- Lee, Seung Min -- Harburg, Daniel V -- Krueger, Neil A -- Shin, Jiho -- Gamble, Paul -- Cheng, Huanyu -- Yu, Sooyoun -- Liu, Zhuangjian -- McCall, Jordan G -- Stephen, Manu -- Ying, Hanze -- Kim, Jeonghyun -- Park, Gayoung -- Webb, R Chad -- Lee, Chi Hwan -- Chung, Sangjin -- Wie, Dae Seung -- Gujar, Amit D -- Vemulapalli, Bharat -- Kim, Albert H -- Lee, Kyung-Mi -- Cheng, Jianjun -- Huang, Younggang -- Lee, Sang Hoon -- Braun, Paul V -- Ray, Wilson Z -- Rogers, John A -- F31MH101956/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Feb 4;530(7588):71-6. doi: 10.1038/nature16492. Epub 2016 Jan 18.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, Republic of Korea. ; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA. ; Institute of High Performance Computing, Singapore 138632, Singapore. ; Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA. ; Department of Biomicrosystem Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701, South Korea. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-713, South Korea. ; Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, The Center for Implantable Devices, Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA. ; School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, USA. ; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Skin Disease Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA. ; Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-703, South Korea. ; Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26779949" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Absorbable Implants/adverse effects ; Administration, Cutaneous ; Animals ; Body Temperature ; Brain/*metabolism/surgery ; Electronics/*instrumentation ; Equipment Design ; Hydrolysis ; Male ; Monitoring, Physiologic/adverse effects/*instrumentation ; Organ Specificity ; Pressure ; *Prostheses and Implants/adverse effects ; Rats ; Rats, Inbred Lew ; *Silicon ; Telemetry/instrumentation ; Wireless Technology/instrumentation
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-04-23
    Description: Mucosal surfaces constantly encounter microbes. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) mediate recognition of microbial patterns to eliminate pathogens. By contrast, we demonstrate that the prominent gut commensal Bacteroides fragilis activates the TLR pathway to establish host-microbial symbiosis. TLR2 on CD4(+) T cells is required for B. fragilis colonization of a unique mucosal niche in mice during homeostasis. A symbiosis factor (PSA, polysaccharide A) of B. fragilis signals through TLR2 directly on Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells to promote immunologic tolerance. B. fragilis lacking PSA is unable to restrain T helper 17 cell responses and is defective in niche-specific mucosal colonization. Therefore, commensal bacteria exploit the TLR pathway to actively suppress immunity. We propose that the immune system can discriminate between pathogens and the microbiota through recognition of symbiotic bacterial molecules in a process that engenders commensal colonization.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3164325/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3164325/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Round, June L -- Lee, S Melanie -- Li, Jennifer -- Tran, Gloria -- Jabri, Bana -- Chatila, Talal A -- Mazmanian, Sarkis K -- AI 080002/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI 088626/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- DK 078938/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK 083633/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI085090/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI085090-01/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI085090-01S1/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI085090-02/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI085090-03/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK078938/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK078938-01A2/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK078938-02/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK078938-03/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK078938-04/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI080002/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI080002-01/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI080002-02/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI088626/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI088626-01/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI088626-02/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 DK083633/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R21 DK083633-01A1/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R21 DK083633-02/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 May 20;332(6032):974-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1206095. Epub 2011 Apr 21.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. jround@caltech.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21512004" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Bacteroides fragilis/*growth & development/*immunology ; Colon/immunology/microbiology ; Germ-Free Life ; Homeostasis ; Humans ; *Immune Tolerance ; Immunity, Mucosal ; Interleukin-10/metabolism ; Intestinal Mucosa/*immunology/*microbiology ; Metagenome ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Models, Biological ; Polysaccharides, Bacterial/immunology/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms ; Symbiosis ; T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology ; Th17 Cells/immunology ; Toll-Like Receptor 2/immunology/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-01-09
    Description: Expansion and death of effector CD8 T cells are regulated to limit immunopathology and cells that escape contraction go on to generate immunological memory. CD44, a receptor for the extracellular matrix component hyaluronan, is a marker of activated and memory T cells. Here, we show with a murine model that the increase in CD44 expression and hyaluronan binding induced upon CD8 T cell activation was proportional to the strength of TCR engagement, thereby identifying the most strongly activated T cells. When CD44 −/− and CD44 +/+ OT-I CD8 T cells were adoptively transferred into mice challenged with Listeria -OVA, there was a slight increase in the percentage of CD44 +/+ cells at the effector site. However, CD44 +/+ cells were out-competed by CD44 −/− cells after the contraction phase in the lymphoid tissues, and the CD44 −/− cells preferentially formed more memory cells. The hyaluronan-binding CD44 +/+ CD8 effector T cells showed increased pAkt expression, higher glucose uptake, and were more susceptible to cell death during the contraction phase compared to non-binding CD44 +/+ and CD44 −/− OT-I CD8 T cells, suggesting that CD44 and its engagement with hyaluronan skews CD8 T cells towards a terminal effector differentiation state that reduces their ability to form memory cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved
    Print ISSN: 0014-2980
    Electronic ISSN: 1521-4141
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by Wiley-Blackwell
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-02-28
    Description: Objective Accurate cardiovascular risk estimations by patients and doctors are important as these affect health behaviour and medical decision making. We aimed to determine if doctors and patients were accurately estimating the absolute cardiovascular risk of patients in primary care. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in primary care clinics in Malaysia in 2014. Patients aged 35 years and above without known cardiovascular disease (CVDs) were included. Face-to-face interviews with a structured questionnaire were used to collect sociodemographic and clinical data as well as patients’ perception and doctors’ estimate of the patients’ CVD risk. Associations were tested using 2 , correlation and independent t-tests. Results We recruited 1094 patients and 57 doctors. Using the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) alone, 508 patients (46.4%) were in the high-risk group. When diabetes was included as high risk, the number increased to 776 (70.9%). Only 34.4% of patients and 55.7% of doctors correctly estimated the patient’s CVD risk in comparison with the reference FRS. Of the high-risk patients, 664 (85.6%) underestimated their CV risk. Factors associated with underestimation by patients included not having family history of CVD (adjusted OR (AOR): 2.705, 95% CI 1.538 to 4.757), smaller waist circumference (AOR: 0.979,95% CI 0.960 to 0.999) and ethnicity in comparison with the Malay as reference group (indigenous/others: AOR: 0.129, 95% CI 0.071 to 0.235). Doctors underestimated risk in 59.8% of the high-risk group. Factors associated with underestimation by doctors were patients factors such as being female (AOR: 2.232, 95% CI 1.460 to 3.410), younger age (AOR: 0.908, 95% CI 0.886 to 0.930), non-hypertensive (AOR: 1.731, 95% CI 1.067 to 2.808), non-diabetic (AOR: 1.931, 95% CI 1.114 to 3.348), higher high-density lipoprotein levels (AOR: 3.546, 95% CI 2.025 to 6.209), lower systolic blood pressure (AOR: 0.970, 95% CI 0.957 to 0.982), non-smoker (AOR: 2.246, 95% CI 1.354 to 3.726) and ethnicity in comparison with the Malay as reference group (Indian: AOR: 0.430, 95% CI 0.257 to 0.720; indigenous/others: AOR: 2.498, 95% CI 1.346 to 4.636). Conclusions The majority of consultations occurring between doctors and patients are being informed by inaccurate cardiovascular risk estimation.
    Keywords: Open access, General practice / Family practice, Communication
    Electronic ISSN: 2044-6055
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...