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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-07-06
    Description: Drug resistance presents a challenge to the treatment of cancer patients. Many studies have focused on cell-autonomous mechanisms of drug resistance. By contrast, we proposed that the tumour micro-environment confers innate resistance to therapy. Here we developed a co-culture system to systematically assay the ability of 23 stromal cell types to influence the innate resistance of 45 cancer cell lines to 35 anticancer drugs. We found that stroma-mediated resistance is common, particularly to targeted agents. We characterized further the stroma-mediated resistance of BRAF-mutant melanoma to RAF inhibitors because most patients with this type of cancer show some degree of innate resistance. Proteomic analysis showed that stromal cell secretion of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) resulted in activation of the HGF receptor MET, reactivation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI(3)K)-AKT signalling pathways, and immediate resistance to RAF inhibition. Immunohistochemistry experiments confirmed stromal cell expression of HGF in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma and showed a significant correlation between HGF expression by stromal cells and innate resistance to RAF inhibitor treatment. Dual inhibition of RAF and either HGF or MET resulted in reversal of drug resistance, suggesting RAF plus HGF or MET inhibitory combination therapy as a potential therapeutic strategy for BRAF-mutant melanoma. A similar resistance mechanism was uncovered in a subset of BRAF-mutant colorectal and glioblastoma cell lines. More generally, this study indicates that the systematic dissection of interactions between tumours and their micro-environment can uncover important mechanisms underlying drug resistance.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3711467/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3711467/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Straussman, Ravid -- Morikawa, Teppei -- Shee, Kevin -- Barzily-Rokni, Michal -- Qian, Zhi Rong -- Du, Jinyan -- Davis, Ashli -- Mongare, Margaret M -- Gould, Joshua -- Frederick, Dennie T -- Cooper, Zachary A -- Chapman, Paul B -- Solit, David B -- Ribas, Antoni -- Lo, Roger S -- Flaherty, Keith T -- Ogino, Shuji -- Wargo, Jennifer A -- Golub, Todd R -- P50CA093683/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54 CA112962/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54CA112962/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- UM1 CA186709/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jul 26;487(7408):500-4. doi: 10.1038/nature11183.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22763439" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Coculture Techniques ; *Drug Resistance, Neoplasm/drug effects ; Hepatocyte Growth Factor/metabolism/*secretion ; Humans ; Indoles/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Melanoma/drug therapy/genetics/*metabolism/pathology ; Molecular Targeted Therapy ; Mutation ; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism ; Prognosis ; Protein Kinase Inhibitors/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Proteomics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf/*antagonists & inhibitors/genetics ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; Signal Transduction/drug effects ; Stromal Cells/cytology/drug effects/metabolism/secretion ; Sulfonamides/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Tumor Microenvironment/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-11-28
    Description: A remarkable feature of regenerative processes is their ability to halt proliferation once an organ's structure has been restored. The Wnt signalling pathway is the major driving force for homeostatic self-renewal and regeneration in the mammalian intestine. However, the mechanisms that counterbalance Wnt-driven proliferation are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate in mice and humans that yes-associated protein 1 (YAP; also known as YAP1)--a protein known for its powerful growth-inducing and oncogenic properties--has an unexpected growth-suppressive function, restricting Wnt signals during intestinal regeneration. Transgenic expression of YAP reduces Wnt target gene expression and results in the rapid loss of intestinal crypts. In addition, loss of YAP results in Wnt hypersensitivity during regeneration, leading to hyperplasia, expansion of intestinal stem cells and niche cells, and formation of ectopic crypts and microadenomas. We find that cytoplasmic YAP restricts elevated Wnt signalling independently of the AXIN-APC-GSK-3beta complex partly by limiting the activity of dishevelled (DVL). DVL signals in the nucleus of intestinal stem cells, and its forced expression leads to enhanced Wnt signalling in crypts. YAP dampens Wnt signals by restricting DVL nuclear translocation during regenerative growth. Finally, we provide evidence that YAP is silenced in a subset of highly aggressive and undifferentiated human colorectal carcinomas, and that its expression can restrict the growth of colorectal carcinoma xenografts. Collectively, our work describes a novel mechanistic paradigm for how proliferative signals are counterbalanced in regenerating tissues. Additionally, our findings have important implications for the targeting of YAP in human malignancies.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3536889/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3536889/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Barry, Evan R -- Morikawa, Teppei -- Butler, Brian L -- Shrestha, Kriti -- de la Rosa, Rosemarie -- Yan, Kelley S -- Fuchs, Charles S -- Magness, Scott T -- Smits, Ron -- Ogino, Shuji -- Kuo, Calvin J -- Camargo, Fernando D -- 1K08DK096048/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- 1U01DK085527/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- AR064036/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- K08 DK096048/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P01CA87969/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK049216/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P50CA127003/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR064036/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA131426/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA151993/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK091427/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- U01 DK085527/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jan 3;493(7430):106-10. doi: 10.1038/nature11693. Epub 2012 Nov 25.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Stem Cell Program and Department of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23178811" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Active Transport, Cell Nucleus ; Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Animals ; *Cell Proliferation ; Colorectal Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/pathology ; Genes, Tumor Suppressor ; Humans ; Intestines/*cytology/physiology ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; Neoplasm Transplantation ; Phosphoproteins/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Regeneration/*physiology ; Stem Cell Niche ; Stem Cells/*cytology/*metabolism ; Thrombospondins/genetics/metabolism ; Tumor Suppressor Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Wnt Proteins/metabolism ; Wnt Signaling Pathway
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Keywords: HEALTH ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; COLON-CANCER ; PREDICTION ; MUTATION CARRIERS ; METAANALYSIS ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; TASK-FORCE ; CHROMOSOME 8Q24 ; AMERICAN-COLLEGE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) can be greatly reduced through screening. To aid in the development of screening strategies, we refined models designed to determine risk of CRC by incorporating information from common genetic susceptibility loci. METHODS: By using data collected from more than 12,000 participants in 6 studies performed from 1990 through 2011 in the United States and Germany, we developed risk determination models based on sex, age, family history, genetic risk score (number of risk alleles carried at 27 validated common CRC susceptibility loci), and history of endoscopic examinations. The model was validated using data collected from approximately 1800 participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial, conducted from 1993 through 2001 in the United States. RESULTS: We identified a CRC genetic risk score that independently predicted which patients in the training set would develop CRC. Compared with determination of risk based only on family history, adding the genetic risk score increased the discriminatory accuracy from 0.51 to 0.59 (P = .0028) for men and from 0.52 to 0.56 (P = .14) for women. We calculated age-and sex-specific 10-year CRC absolute risk estimates based on the number of risk alleles, family history, and history of endoscopic examinations. A model that included a genetic risk score better determined the recommended starting age for screening in subjects with and without family histories of CRC. The starting age for high-risk men (family history of CRC and genetic risk score, 90%) was 42 years, and for low-risk men (no family history of CRC and genetic risk score, 10%) was 52 years. For men with no family history and a high genetic risk score (90%), the starting age would be 47 years; this is an intermediate value that is 5 years earlier than it would be for men with a genetic risk score of 10%. Similar trends were observed in women. CONCLUSIONS: By incorporating information on CRC risk alleles, we created a model to determine the risk for CRC more accurately. This model might be used to develop screening and prevention strategies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25683114
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  • 4
    Keywords: INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; metabolic syndrome ; susceptibility loci ; SERUM ADIPONECTIN ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; MENDELIAN RANDOMIZATION ; CIRCULATING ADIPONECTIN ; PLASMA ADIPONECTIN ; SOLUBLE LEPTIN RECEPTOR ; MOLECULAR-WEIGHT ADIPONECTIN
    Abstract: Circulating adiponectin has been associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). Genome-wide association studies have identified several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with adiponectin levels. However, it is unclear whether these SNPs are associated with CRC risk. In addition, previous data on SNPs in the adiponectin pathway and their associations with CRC are inconsistent. Therefore, we examined 19 SNPs in genes related to adiponectin or its receptors and their associations with CRC using logistic regression among 7,020 cases and 7,631 controls drawn from ten studies included in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium. Using data from a subset of two large cohort studies, we also assessed the contribution of individual SNPs and an adiponectin genetic score to plasma adiponectin after accounting for lifestyle factors among 2,217 women and 619 men. We did not find any statistically significant association between the 19 adiponectin-associated SNPs and CRC risk (multivariable-adjusted odds ratios ranged from 0.89 to 1.05, all p 〉 0.05). Each SNP explained less than 2.50% of the variance of plasma adiponectin, and the genetic score collectively accounted for 2.95 and 1.42% of the variability of adiponectin in women and men, respectively, after adjustment for age, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, regular use of aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and postmenopausal hormone use. In conclusion, our findings do not support an association between known adiponectin-related common SNPs and CRC incidence. However, known common SNPs account for only a limited proportion of the interindividual variance in circulating adiponectin. Further work is warranted to investigate the relationship between adiponectin and CRC while accounting for other components in the pathway.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25431318
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  • 5
    Keywords: COLON-CANCER ; microsatellite instability ; POPULATION-BASED SAMPLE ; ULCERATIVE-COLITIS ; CROHNS-DISEASE ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; ISLAND METHYLATOR PHENOTYPE ; MOLECULAR-FEATURES ; MAIT CELLS
    Abstract: We identified the minor allele (T) in SNP rs11676348 to have pleiotropic effect on risk of UC and CRC, particularly in tumors with an inflammatory component. Our findings offer the promise of risk stratification of UC patients for developing CRC.Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have separately identified many genetic susceptibility loci for ulcerative colitis (UC), Crohn's disease (CD) and colorectal cancer (CRC), there has been no large-scale examination for pleiotropy, or shared genetic susceptibility, for these conditions. We used logistic regression modeling to examine the associations of 181 UC and CD susceptibility variants previously identified by GWAS with risk of CRC using data from the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. We also examined associations of significant variants with clinical and molecular characteristics in a subset of the studies. Among 11794 CRC cases and 14190 controls, rs11676348, the susceptibility single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for UC, was significantly associated with reduced risk of CRC (P = 7E-05). The multivariate-adjusted odds ratio of CRC with each copy of the T allele was 0.93 (95% CI 0.89-0.96). The association of the SNP with risk of CRC differed according to mucinous histological features (P (heterogeneity) = 0.008). In addition, the (T) allele was associated with lower risk of tumors with Crohn's-like reaction but not tumors without such immune infiltrate (P (heterogeneity) = 0.02) and microsatellite instability-high (MSI-high) but not microsatellite stable or MSI-low tumors (P (heterogeneity) = 0.03). The minor allele (T) in SNP rs11676348, located downstream from CXCR2 that has been implicated in CRC progression, is associated with a lower risk of CRC, particularly tumors with a mucinous component, Crohn's-like reaction and MSI-high. Our findings offer the promise of risk stratification of inflammatory bowel disease patients for complications such as CRC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26071399
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  • 6
    Keywords: HEALTH ; DESIGN ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; OBESITY ; COLON-CANCER ; microsatellite instability ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; INSTRUMENTAL VARIABLES
    Abstract: Background: High body mass index (BMI) is consistently linked to increased risk of colorectal cancer for men, whereas the association is less clear for women. As risk estimates from observational studies may be biased and/or confounded, we conducted a Mendelian randomization study to estimate the causal association between BMI and colorectal cancer. Methods: Weused data from 10,226 colorectal cancer cases and 10,286 controls of European ancestry. The Mendelian randomization analysis used a weighted genetic risk score, derived from 77 genome-wide association study-identified variants associated with higher BMI, as an instrumental variable (IV). We compared the IV odds ratio (IV-OR) with the OR obtained using a conventional covariate-adjusted analysis. Results: Individuals carrying greater numbers of BMI-increasing alleles had higher colorectal cancer risk[ per weighted allele OR, 1.31; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-1.57]. Our IV estimation results support the hypothesis that genetically influenced BMI is directly associated with risk for colorectal cancer (IV-OR per 5 kg/m(2), 1.50; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01). In the sex-specific IV analyses higher BMI was associated with higher risk of colorectal cancer among women (IV-OR per 5 kg/m(2), 1.82; 95% CI, 1.26-2.61). For men, genetically influenced BMI was not associated with colorectal cancer (IV-OR per 5 kg/m(2), 1.18; 95% CI, 0.73-1.92). Conclusions: High BMI was associated with increased colorectal cancer risk for women. Whether abdominal obesity, rather than overall obesity, is a more important risk factor for men requires further investigation. Impact: Overall, conventional epidemiologic and Mendelian randomization studies suggest a strong association between obesity and the risk of colorectal cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25976416
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  • 7
  • 8
    Keywords: COHORT ; HETEROCYCLIC AMINES ; POLYMORPHISMS ; smoking ; COLON-CANCER ; CONSUMPTION ; EXCISION-REPAIR ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; POULTRY INTAKE
    Abstract: Background: Red meat intake has been associated with risk of colorectal cancer, potentially mediated through heterocyclic amines. The metabolic efficiency of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) required for the metabolic activation of such amines is influenced by genetic variation. The interaction between red meat intake, NAT2 genotype, and colorectal cancer has been inconsistently reported. Methods: We used pooled individual-level data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium. Red meat intake was collected by each study. We inferred NAT2 phenotype based on polymorphism at rs1495741, highly predictive of enzyme activity. Interaction was assessed using multiplicative interaction terms in multivariate-adjusted models. Results: From 11 studies, 8,290 colorectal cancer cases and 9,115 controls were included. The highest quartile of red meat intake was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer compared with the lowest quartile [ OR, 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.29-1.55]. However, a significant association was observed only for studies with retrospective diet data, not for studies with diet prospectively assessed before cancer diagnosis. Combining all studies, high red meat intake was similarly associated with colorectal cancer in those with a rapid/intermediate NAT2 genotype (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.20-1.59) as with a slow genotype (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.28-1.61; P interaction = 0.9). Conclusion: We found that high red meat intake was associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer only from retrospective case-control studies and not modified by NAT2 enzyme activity. Impact: Our results suggest no interaction between NAT2 genotype and red meat intake in mediating risk of colorectal cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25342387
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  • 9
    Keywords: POLYMORPHISMS ; COLON-CANCER ; NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS ; chemoprevention ; METAANALYSIS ; CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; PROSTAGLANDIN E-2 BIOSYNTHESIS ; PIK3CA MUTATION ; INTERLEUKIN-16
    Abstract: MPORTANCE Use of aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer. OBJECTIVE To identify common genetic markers that may confer differential benefit from aspirin or NSAID chemoprevention, we tested gene x environment interactions between regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation to risk of colorectal cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Case-control study using data from 5 case-control and 5 cohort studies initiated between 1976 and 2003 across the United States, Canada, Australia, and Germany and including colorectal cancer cases (n=8634) and matched controls (n=8553) ascertained between 1976 and 2011. Participants were all of European descent. EXPOSURES Genome-wide SNP data and information on regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs and other risk factors. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Colorectal cancer. RESULTS Regular use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs was associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer (prevalence, 28% vs 38%; odds ratio [OR], 0.69 [95% Cl, 0.64-0.74]; P = 6.2 x 10(-28)) compared with nonregular use. In the conventional logistic regression analysis, the SNP rs2965667 at chromosome 12p12.3 near the MGST1 gene showed a genome-wide significant interaction with aspirin and/or NSAID use (P = 4.6 x 10(-9) for interaction). Aspirin and/or NSAID use was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer among individuals with rs2965667-TT genotype (prevalence, 28% vs 38%; OR, 0.66 [95% CI, 0.61-0.70]; P =7.7 x 10(-33)) but with a higher risk among those with rare (4%) TA or AA genotypes (prevalence, 35% vs 29%; OR, 1.89 [95% Cl, 1.27-2.81]; P = .002). In case-only interaction analysis, the SNP rs16973225 at chromosome 15q25.2 near the IL16 gene showed a genome-wide significant interaction with use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs (P = 8.2 x 10(-9) for interaction). Regular use was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer among individuals with rs16973225-AA genotype (prevalence, 28% vs 38%; OR, 0.66 [95% CI, 0.62-0.71]; P = 1.9 x 10(-30)) but was not associated with risk of colorectal cancer among those with less common (9%) AC or CC genotypes (prevalence, 36% vs 39%; OR, 0.97 [95% Cl, 0.78-1.20]; P = .76). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this genome-wide investigation of gene x environment interactions, use of aspirin and/or NSAIDs was associated with lower risk of colorectal cancer, and this association differed according to genetic variation at 2 SNPs at chromosomes 12 and 15. Validation of these findings in additional populations may facilitate targeted colorectal cancer prevention strategies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25781442
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  • 10
    Keywords: WOMEN ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; COLON-CANCER ; UNITED-STATES ; RECTAL-CANCER ; GENETIC EPIDEMIOLOGY ; BODY-SIZE ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; INSTRUMENTAL VARIABLES
    Abstract: Background: For men and women, taller height is associated with increased risk of all cancers combined. For colorectal cancer (CRC), it is unclear whether the differential association of height by sex is real or is due to confounding or bias inherent in observational studies. We performed a Mendelian randomization study to examine the association between height and CRC risk. Methods: To minimize confounding and bias, we derived a weighted genetic risk score predicting height (using 696 genetic variants associated with height) in 10 226 CRC cases and 10 286 controls. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for associations between height, genetically predicted height and CRC. Results: Using conventional methods, increased height (per 10-cm increment) was associated with increased CRC risk (OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.02-1.15). In sex-specific analyses, height was associated with CRC risk for women (OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 1.05-1.26), but not men (OR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.92-1.05). Consistent with these results, carrying greater numbers of (weighted) height-increasing alleles (per 1-unit increase) was associated with higher CRC risk for women and men combined (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.01-1.14) and for women (OR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.01-1.19). There was weaker evidence of an association for men (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.96-1.15). Conclusion: We provide evidence for a causal association between height and CRC for women. The CRC-height association for men remains unclear and warrants further investigation in other large studies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25997436
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