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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; COMBINATION ; DISEASE ; RISK ; GENE ; GENE-EXPRESSION ; IMPACT ; BIOLOGY ; MOLECULAR-BIOLOGY ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; gene expression ; NUMBER ; MUTATION ; genetics ; SNP ; colorectal cancer ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; REGION ; MUTATIONS ; INDIVIDUALS ; SERIES ; HEALTHY ; heredity ; molecular biology ; molecular ; RE ; VARIANT ; INCREASE ; METAANALYSIS ; ALLELES ; LOCUS ; single-nucleotide polymorphism ; ENGLAND ; 8Q24 ; INCREASES ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; association study ; SCAN ; GENOME-WIDE
    Abstract: The common single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3802842 at 11q23.1 has recently been reported to be associated with risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). To examine this association in detail we genotyped rs3802842 in eight independent case-control series comprising a total of 10 638 cases and 10 457 healthy individuals. A significant association between the C allele of rs3802842 and CRC risk was found (per allele OR = 1.17; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.12-1.22; P = 1.08 x 10(-12)) with the risk allele more frequent in rectal than colonic disease (P = 0.02). In combination with 8q21, 8q24, 10p14, 11q, 15q13.3 and 18q21 variants, the risk of CRC increases with an increasing numbers of variant alleles for the six loci (ORper allele = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.15-1.23; P-trend = 7.4 x 10(-24)). Using the data from our genome-wide association study of CRC, LD mapping and imputation, we were able to refine the location of the causal locus to a 60 kb region and screened for coding changes. The absence of exonic mutations in any of the transcripts (FLJ45803, LOC120376, C11orf53 and POU2AF1) mapping to this region makes the association likely to be a consequence of non-coding effects on gene expression
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18753146
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; MODEL ; NEW-YORK ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; TUMORS ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST-CANCER ; genetics ; colorectal cancer ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; genotyping ; HIGH-RISK ; REPLICATION ; heredity ; RE ; VARIANT ; SNPs ; METAANALYSIS ; ALLELES ; analysis ; PHASE ; USA ; ENGLAND ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; SCAN ; EIF3S3
    Abstract: To identify colorectal cancer (CRC) susceptibility alleles, we conducted a genome-wide association study. In phase 1, we genotyped 550,163 tagSNPs in 940 familial colorectal tumor cases (627 CRC, 313 high-risk adenoma) and 965 controls. In phase 2, we genotyped 42,708 selected SNPs in 2,873 CRC cases and 2,871 controls. In phase 3, we evaluated 11 SNPs showing association at P 〈 10(-4) in a joint analysis of phases 1 and 2 in 4,287 CRC cases and 3,743 controls. Two SNPs were taken forward to phase 4 genotyping ( 10,731 CRC cases and 10,961 controls from eight centers). In addition to the previously reported 8q24, 15q13 and 18q21 CRC risk loci, we identified two previously unreported associations: rs10795668, located at 10p14 (P=2.5 x 10(-13) overall; P=6.9 x 10(-12) replication), and rs16892766, at 8q23.3 (P=3.3 x 10(-18) overall; P=9.6 x 10(-17) replication), which tags a plausible causative gene, EIF3H. These data provide further evidence for the 'common-disease common-variant' model of CRC predisposition
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18372905
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1573-7284
    Keywords: Hypertension ; Job absenteeism ; Spain
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract This study reports the findings of one of the stages of a programme for the detection and control of arterial hypertension, started in I980 in an automobile company with a workforce of 9,782. In the initial screening, 522 hypertensive males were found using epidemiological criteria and 206 of these fulfilled the criteria of definite hypertension. The objective of this study consisted of evaluating, 9 years after the start of the program, the indirect cost in terms of the reduction in the morbidity indicator-temporary work incapacity (TWI). Analysis is based on a comparison of the prevalence of hypertension in the population when the program was begun (6%) and in 1989 (9.8%). It can be observed that the TWI rate of the hypertensive population was significantly higher than that of the rest of the workforce, and that this remained true for the reference group (RG) hypertensives a year after the study was initiated. In contrast, the intervention group (IG) showed significantly lower TWI levels, not only in comparison with the RG but also with the rest of the workers. The estimated reduction in TWI for 1989 was 4.500 days/year, which corresponds to an estimated saving of 76.500.000 pesetas/year.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2011-01-07
    Description: The properties of polycrystalline materials are often dominated by the size of their grains and by the atomic structure of their grain boundaries. These effects should be especially pronounced in two-dimensional materials, where even a line defect can divide and disrupt a crystal. These issues take on practical significance in graphene, which is a hexagonal, two-dimensional crystal of carbon atoms. Single-atom-thick graphene sheets can now be produced by chemical vapour deposition on scales of up to metres, making their polycrystallinity almost unavoidable. Theoretically, graphene grain boundaries are predicted to have distinct electronic, magnetic, chemical and mechanical properties that strongly depend on their atomic arrangement. Yet because of the five-order-of-magnitude size difference between grains and the atoms at grain boundaries, few experiments have fully explored the graphene grain structure. Here we use a combination of old and new transmission electron microscopy techniques to bridge these length scales. Using atomic-resolution imaging, we determine the location and identity of every atom at a grain boundary and find that different grains stitch together predominantly through pentagon-heptagon pairs. Rather than individually imaging the several billion atoms in each grain, we use diffraction-filtered imaging to rapidly map the location, orientation and shape of several hundred grains and boundaries, where only a handful have been previously reported. The resulting images reveal an unexpectedly small and intricate patchwork of grains connected by tilt boundaries. By correlating grain imaging with scanning probe and transport measurements, we show that these grain boundaries severely weaken the mechanical strength of graphene membranes but do not as drastically alter their electrical properties. These techniques open a new window for studies on the structure, properties and control of grains and grain boundaries in graphene and other two-dimensional materials.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Huang, Pinshane Y -- Ruiz-Vargas, Carlos S -- van der Zande, Arend M -- Whitney, William S -- Levendorf, Mark P -- Kevek, Joshua W -- Garg, Shivank -- Alden, Jonathan S -- Hustedt, Caleb J -- Zhu, Ye -- Park, Jiwoong -- McEuen, Paul L -- Muller, David A -- England -- Nature. 2011 Jan 20;469(7330):389-92. doi: 10.1038/nature09718. Epub 2011 Jan 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21209615" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Copper ; Graphite/*chemistry ; Microscopy, Atomic Force ; Microscopy, Electron, Scanning Transmission ; Microscopy, Electron, Transmission ; Particle Size
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-02-25
    Description: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare and fatal human premature ageing disease, characterized by premature arteriosclerosis and degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). HGPS is caused by a single point mutation in the lamin A (LMNA) gene, resulting in the generation of progerin, a truncated splicing mutant of lamin A. Accumulation of progerin leads to various ageing-associated nuclear defects including disorganization of nuclear lamina and loss of heterochromatin. Here we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts obtained from patients with HGPS. HGPS-iPSCs show absence of progerin, and more importantly, lack the nuclear envelope and epigenetic alterations normally associated with premature ageing. Upon differentiation of HGPS-iPSCs, progerin and its ageing-associated phenotypic consequences are restored. Specifically, directed differentiation of HGPS-iPSCs to SMCs leads to the appearance of premature senescence phenotypes associated with vascular ageing. Additionally, our studies identify DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNAPKcs, also known as PRKDC) as a downstream target of progerin. The absence of nuclear DNAPK holoenzyme correlates with premature as well as physiological ageing. Because progerin also accumulates during physiological ageing, our results provide an in vitro iPSC-based model to study the pathogenesis of human premature and physiological vascular ageing.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3088088/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3088088/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Liu, Guang-Hui -- Barkho, Basam Z -- Ruiz, Sergio -- Diep, Dinh -- Qu, Jing -- Yang, Sheng-Lian -- Panopoulos, Athanasia D -- Suzuki, Keiichiro -- Kurian, Leo -- Walsh, Christopher -- Thompson, James -- Boue, Stephanie -- Fung, Ho Lim -- Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio -- Zhang, Kun -- Yates, John 3rd -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- P41 RR011823/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA025779/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA025779-01/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01-DA025779/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009370/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA009370-25A1/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Apr 14;472(7342):221-5. doi: 10.1038/nature09879. Epub 2011 Feb 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21346760" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aging/metabolism/pathology/physiology ; Aging, Premature/genetics/pathology/physiopathology ; Calcium-Binding Proteins/analysis ; Cell Aging ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Line ; Cellular Reprogramming ; DNA-Activated Protein Kinase/metabolism ; Epigenesis, Genetic ; Fibroblasts/pathology ; Holoenzymes/metabolism ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism/*pathology ; Lamin Type A ; Microfilament Proteins/analysis ; Models, Biological ; Muscle, Smooth, Vascular/pathology ; Nuclear Envelope/pathology ; Nuclear Proteins/analysis/genetics/metabolism ; Phenotype ; Progeria/genetics/pathology/physiopathology ; Protein Precursors/analysis/genetics/metabolism ; Substrate Specificity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2011-03-04
    Description: Defined transcription factors can induce epigenetic reprogramming of adult mammalian cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. Although DNA factors are integrated during some reprogramming methods, it is unknown whether the genome remains unchanged at the single nucleotide level. Here we show that 22 human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell lines reprogrammed using five different methods each contained an average of five protein-coding point mutations in the regions sampled (an estimated six protein-coding point mutations per exome). The majority of these mutations were non-synonymous, nonsense or splice variants, and were enriched in genes mutated or having causative effects in cancers. At least half of these reprogramming-associated mutations pre-existed in fibroblast progenitors at low frequencies, whereas the rest occurred during or after reprogramming. Thus, hiPS cells acquire genetic modifications in addition to epigenetic modifications. Extensive genetic screening should become a standard procedure to ensure hiPS cell safety before clinical use.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3074107/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3074107/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Gore, Athurva -- Li, Zhe -- Fung, Ho-Lim -- Young, Jessica E -- Agarwal, Suneet -- Antosiewicz-Bourget, Jessica -- Canto, Isabel -- Giorgetti, Alessandra -- Israel, Mason A -- Kiskinis, Evangelos -- Lee, Je-Hyuk -- Loh, Yuin-Han -- Manos, Philip D -- Montserrat, Nuria -- Panopoulos, Athanasia D -- Ruiz, Sergio -- Wilbert, Melissa L -- Yu, Junying -- Kirkness, Ewen F -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- Rossi, Derrick J -- Thomson, James A -- Eggan, Kevin -- Daley, George Q -- Goldstein, Lawrence S B -- Zhang, Kun -- K08 HL089150/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL094963/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL094963-01/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM008666/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 HL100001/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Mar 3;471(7336):63-7. doi: 10.1038/nature09805.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bioengineering, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21368825" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cells, Cultured ; Cellular Reprogramming/*genetics ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Epistasis, Genetic/genetics ; Fibroblasts/cytology/metabolism ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology/*metabolism ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Models, Genetic ; Mutagenesis/*genetics ; Open Reading Frames/genetics ; Point Mutation/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-10-19
    Description: Nuclear-architecture defects have been shown to correlate with the manifestation of a number of human diseases as well as ageing. It is therefore plausible that diseases whose manifestations correlate with ageing might be connected to the appearance of nuclear aberrations over time. We decided to evaluate nuclear organization in the context of ageing-associated disorders by focusing on a leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) dominant mutation (G2019S; glycine-to-serine substitution at amino acid 2019), which is associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease as well as impairment of adult neurogenesis in mice. Here we report on the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from Parkinson's disease patients and the implications of LRRK2(G2019S) mutation in human neural-stem-cell (NSC) populations. Mutant NSCs showed increased susceptibility to proteasomal stress as well as passage-dependent deficiencies in nuclear-envelope organization, clonal expansion and neuronal differentiation. Disease phenotypes were rescued by targeted correction of the LRRK2(G2019S) mutation with its wild-type counterpart in Parkinson's disease iPSCs and were recapitulated after targeted knock-in of the LRRK2(G2019S) mutation in human embryonic stem cells. Analysis of human brain tissue showed nuclear-envelope impairment in clinically diagnosed Parkinson's disease patients. Together, our results identify the nucleus as a previously unknown cellular organelle in Parkinson's disease pathology and may help to open new avenues for Parkinson's disease diagnoses as well as for the potential development of therapeutics targeting this fundamental cell structure.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3504651/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3504651/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Liu, Guang-Hui -- Qu, Jing -- Suzuki, Keiichiro -- Nivet, Emmanuel -- Li, Mo -- Montserrat, Nuria -- Yi, Fei -- Xu, Xiuling -- Ruiz, Sergio -- Zhang, Weiqi -- Wagner, Ulrich -- Kim, Audrey -- Ren, Bing -- Li, Ying -- Goebl, April -- Kim, Jessica -- Soligalla, Rupa Devi -- Dubova, Ilir -- Thompson, James -- Yates, John 3rd -- Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez -- Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- GTB07001/Telethon/Italy -- P41 RR011823/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Nov 22;491(7425):603-7. doi: 10.1038/nature11557. Epub 2012 Oct 17.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China. ghliu@ibp.ac.cn〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23075850" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Apoptosis ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Division ; Cell Line ; Clone Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Gene Knock-In Techniques ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Mutant Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Mutation ; Neural Stem Cells/metabolism/*pathology ; Nuclear Envelope/genetics/pathology ; Parkinson Disease/*pathology ; Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/*genetics/*metabolism ; Stress, Physiological
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2012-06-02
    Description: Graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is polycrystalline, and scattering of charge carriers at grain boundaries (GBs) could degrade its performance relative to exfoliated, single-crystal graphene. However, the electrical properties of GBs have so far been addressed indirectly without simultaneous knowledge of their locations and structures. We present electrical measurements on individual GBs in CVD graphene first imaged by transmission electron microscopy. Unexpectedly, the electrical conductance improves by one order of magnitude for GBs with better interdomain connectivity. Our study suggests that polycrystalline graphene with good stitching may allow for uniformly high electrical performance rivaling that of exfoliated samples, which we demonstrate using optimized growth conditions and device geometry.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tsen, Adam W -- Brown, Lola -- Levendorf, Mark P -- Ghahari, Fereshte -- Huang, Pinshane Y -- Havener, Robin W -- Ruiz-Vargas, Carlos S -- Muller, David A -- Kim, Philip -- Park, Jiwoong -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jun 1;336(6085):1143-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1218948.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Applied Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22654054" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-07-26
    Description: The subduction zone in northern Chile is a well-identified seismic gap that last ruptured in 1877. The moment magnitude (Mw) 8.1 Iquique earthquake of 1 April 2014 broke a highly coupled portion of this gap. To understand the seismicity preceding this event, we studied the location and mechanisms of the foreshocks and computed Global Positioning System (GPS) time series at stations located on shore. Seismicity off the coast of Iquique started to increase in January 2014. After 16 March, several Mw 〉 6 events occurred near the low-coupled zone. These events migrated northward for ~50 kilometers until the 1 April earthquake occurred. On 16 March, on-shore continuous GPS stations detected a westward motion that we model as a slow slip event situated in the same area where the mainshock occurred.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ruiz, S -- Metois, M -- Fuenzalida, A -- Ruiz, J -- Leyton, F -- Grandin, R -- Vigny, C -- Madariaga, R -- Campos, J -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Sep 5;345(6201):1165-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1256074. Epub 2014 Jul 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Departamento de Geofisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile. sruiz@dgf.uchile.cl. ; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Centro Nazionale Terremoti, Rome, Italy. ; School of Environmental Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. ; Departamento de Geofisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile. ; Centro Sismologico Nacional, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile. ; Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Universite Paris Diderot, UMR 7154 CNRS, Paris, France. ; Laboratoire de Geologie, UMR 8538 CNRS Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris, France.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25061132" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-03-23
    Description: Background Stüve-Wiedemann syndrome (SWS) is characterised by bowing of the lower limbs, respiratory distress and hyperthermia that are often responsible for early death. Survivors develop progressive scoliosis and spontaneous fractures. We previously identified LIFR mutations in most SWS cases, but absence of LIFR pathogenic changes in five patients led us to perform exome sequencing and to identify homozygosity for a FAM46A mutation in one case [p.Ser205Tyrfs*13]. The follow-up of this case supported a final diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), based on vertebral collapses and blue sclerae. Methods and results This prompted us to screen FAM46A in 25 OI patients with no known mutations. We identified a homozygous deleterious variant in FAM46A in two affected sibs with typical OI [p.His127Arg]. Another homozygous variant, [p.Asp231Gly], also classed as deleterious, was detected in a patient with type III OI of consanguineous parents using homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing. FAM46A is a member of the superfamily of nucleotidyltransferase fold proteins but its exact function is presently unknown. Nevertheless, there are lines of evidence pointing to a relevant role of FAM46A in bone development. By RT-PCR analysis, we detected specific expression of FAM46A in human osteoblasts andinterestingly, a nonsense mutation in Fam46a has been recently identified in an ENU-derived ( N -ethyl- N -nitrosourea) mouse model characterised by decreased body length, limb, rib, pelvis, and skull deformities and reduced cortical thickness in long bones. Conclusion We conclude that FAM46A mutations are responsible for a severe form of OI with congenital bowing of the lower limbs and suggest screening this gene in unexplained OI forms.
    Print ISSN: 0022-2593
    Electronic ISSN: 1468-6244
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing Group
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