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  • 1
    Abstract: Melanoma prognosis is dictated by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, the migratory and functional behavior of which is guided by chemokine or cytokine gradients. Here, we retrospectively analyzed the expression patterns of 9 homing receptors (CCR/CXCR) in naive and memory CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in 57 patients with metastatic melanoma (MMel) with various sites of metastases to evaluate whether T cell CCR/CXCR expression correlates with intratumoral accumulation, metastatic progression, and/or overall survival (OS). Homing receptor expression on lymphocytes strongly correlated with MMel dissemination. Loss of CCR6 or CXCR3, but not cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA), on circulating T cell subsets was associated with skin or lymph node metastases, loss of CXCR4, CXCR5, and CCR9 corresponded with lung involvement, and a rise in CCR10 or CD103 was associated with widespread dissemination. High frequencies of CD8+CCR9+ naive T cells correlated with prolonged OS, while neutralizing the CCR9/CCL25 axis in mice stimulated tumor progression. The expansion of CLA-expressing effector memory CD8+ T cells in response to a single administration of CTLA4 blockade predicted disease control at 3 months in 47 patients with MMel. Thus, specific CCR/CXCR expression patterns on circulating T lymphocytes may guide potential diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26854930
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  • 2
    ISSN: 0021-9673
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1398-9995
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: IgG antibody response to the inhalant allergen Parietaria judaica (Pj) and IgG subclass distribution were studied in 82 normal subjects, divided into three groups according to age (0–1, 1–20, and 20–60 years) and in 32 allergic subjects aged 20–60 years. Both normal and allergic subjects showed an IgG response, and all had IgG1 antibodies specific for PjE. Serum IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4 against PjE were detectable in 36%, 46%, and 22% of normal subjects, and in 58%, 31%, and 65% of allergic subjects, respectively. A significant difference in class distribution between allergic and age-matched normal subjects was found only for IgG4 antibodies against PjE (65% and 17%; P〈0.01). The ELISA results were also analyzed quantitatively, taking into account the relative proportion of specific antibodies. Thus, in normal subjects IgG1 antibodies showed a decreasing trend as the age rose, while no differences according to the age of the subject were found for IgG2 and IgG4. When data from allergic subjects (20–60 years) and the age-matched normal group were compared, they were different for the relative percentage of IgG2 only, showing for this a significantly lower value (P〈 0.001). The present data indicate that normal and allergic subjects show differences in the IgG isotype distribution depending on their sensitivity and duration of allergen exposure.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1398-9995
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Olea europaea (olive) pollen extract was prepared by aqueous extraction and characterized by biochemical and immunochemical methods. Two components, displaying respective mol. wt. of 17000 and 19000, were the most reactive allergens, being the doublet (designated Ole e I) recognized by most sera tested. The 19000 mol. wt. component, purified by conventional biochemical procedure and lectin-affinity chromatography from the Ole e I doublet, was deglycosylated and analyzed by SDS–PAGE and by ELISA inhibition. The results obtained suggest that the 19000 mol. wt. component represents the glycosylated form of the 17000 component.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1398-9995
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: The in vitro proliferative response to separated immunologically relevant components of Parietaria judaica pollen extract (PjE) was investigated by proliferation assay and limiting dilution analysis, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Parietaria-allergic subjects and nonallergic controls. In the same subjects, the profile of the antibody response to the PjE fractions was also studied by immunoblotting to evaluate the functional significance of allergen-induced T-cell activation in the two groups. The estimated frequency of PjE-reactive T cells in peripheral-blood mononuclear cells was low in both groups. No difference was found between the Parietaria-allergic subjects and nonallergic controls. To assess the overall contribution to the cellular response of PjE components of different molecular weights, we separated the extract by the SDS-PAGE technique, and the fractions were blotted onto nitrocellulose and solubilized. Almost all the 14 fractions tested induced T-cell proliferation, at different degrees of magnitude. Responses were similar in the allergic subjects and nonallergic controls. Immunoblotting demonstrated specific IgG antibodies to the 14 PjE fractions not only in the allergic subjects, but also in the healthy controls, whereas IgE antibodies were found, as expected, only in the sera from atopic subjects. These findings indicate that PjE fractions elicit similar T-cell activation and IgG production in allergic and normal subjects.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2014-10-09
    Description: The neutralizing antibody response to influenza virus is dominated by antibodies that bind to the globular head of haemagglutinin, which undergoes a continuous antigenic drift, necessitating the re-formulation of influenza vaccines on an annual basis. Recently, several laboratories have described a new class of rare influenza-neutralizing antibodies that target a conserved site in the haemagglutinin stem. Most of these antibodies use the heavy-chain variable region VH1-69 gene, and structural data demonstrate that they bind to the haemagglutinin stem through conserved heavy-chain complementarity determining region (HCDR) residues. However, the VH1-69 antibodies are highly mutated and are produced by some but not all individuals, suggesting that several somatic mutations may be required for their development. To address this, here we characterize 197 anti-stem antibodies from a single donor, reconstruct the developmental pathways of several VH1-69 clones and identify two key elements that are required for the initial development of most VH1-69 antibodies: a polymorphic germline-encoded phenylalanine at position 54 and a conserved tyrosine at position 98 in HCDR3. Strikingly, in most cases a single proline to alanine mutation at position 52a in HCDR2 is sufficient to confer high affinity binding to the selecting H1 antigen, consistent with rapid affinity maturation. Surprisingly, additional favourable mutations continue to accumulate, increasing the breadth of reactivity and making both the initial mutations and phenylalanine at position 54 functionally redundant. These results define VH1-69 allele polymorphism, rearrangement of the VDJ gene segments and single somatic mutations as the three requirements for generating broadly neutralizing VH1-69 antibodies and reveal an unexpected redundancy in the affinity maturation process.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pappas, Leontios -- Foglierini, Mathilde -- Piccoli, Luca -- Kallewaard, Nicole L -- Turrini, Filippo -- Silacci, Chiara -- Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca -- Agatic, Gloria -- Giacchetto-Sasselli, Isabella -- Pellicciotta, Gabriele -- Sallusto, Federica -- Zhu, Qing -- Vicenzi, Elisa -- Corti, Davide -- Lanzavecchia, Antonio -- U19 AI-057266/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Dec 18;516(7531):418-22. doi: 10.1038/nature13764. Epub 2014 Oct 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Insitute for Research in Biomedicine, Universita della Svizzera Italiana, Via Vincenzo Vela 6, 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland. ; Department of Infectious Diseases and Vaccines MedImmune LLC, One MedImmune Way, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20878, USA. ; Viral Pathogens and Biosafety Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milan, Italy. ; Humabs BioMed SA, Via Mirasole 1, 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland. ; Unit of Preventive Medicine, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 58, 20132 Milan, Italy. ; 1] Insitute for Research in Biomedicine, Universita della Svizzera Italiana, Via Vincenzo Vela 6, 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland [2] Humabs BioMed SA, Via Mirasole 1, 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland [3]. ; 1] Insitute for Research in Biomedicine, Universita della Svizzera Italiana, Via Vincenzo Vela 6, 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland [2] Insitute for Microbiology, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland [3].〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25296253" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/*genetics ; Cells, Cultured ; Complementarity Determining Regions/chemistry/*genetics ; Female ; Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/immunology ; Humans ; Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/genetics ; Influenza, Human/*immunology/virology ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Models, Molecular ; Mutation/*genetics ; Orthomyxoviridae/*immunology/metabolism ; Polymorphism, Genetic ; Protein Binding/genetics ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Young Adult
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2015-12-25
    Description: Plasmodium falciparum antigens expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes are important targets of naturally acquired immunity against malaria, but their high number and variability provide the pathogen with a powerful means of escape from host antibodies. Although broadly reactive antibodies against these antigens could be useful as therapeutics and in vaccine design, their identification has proven elusive. Here we report the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that recognize erythrocytes infected by different P. falciparum isolates and opsonize these cells by binding to members of the RIFIN family. These antibodies acquired broad reactivity through a novel mechanism of insertion of a large DNA fragment between the V and DJ segments. The insert, which is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RIFINs, encodes the entire 98 amino acid collagen-binding domain of LAIR1, an immunoglobulin superfamily inhibitory receptor encoded on chromosome 19. In each of the two donors studied, the antibodies are produced by a single expanded B-cell clone and carry distinct somatic mutations in the LAIR1 domain that abolish binding to collagen and increase binding to infected erythrocytes. These findings illustrate, with a biologically relevant example, a novel mechanism of antibody diversification by interchromosomal DNA transposition and demonstrate the existence of conserved epitopes that may be suitable candidates for the development of a malaria vaccine.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tan, Joshua -- Pieper, Kathrin -- Piccoli, Luca -- Abdi, Abdirahman -- Foglierini, Mathilde -- Geiger, Roger -- Tully, Claire Maria -- Jarrossay, David -- Ndungu, Francis Maina -- Wambua, Juliana -- Bejon, Philip -- Fregni, Chiara Silacci -- Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca -- Barbieri, Sonia -- Bianchi, Siro -- Marsh, Kevin -- Thathy, Vandana -- Corti, Davide -- Sallusto, Federica -- Bull, Peter -- Lanzavecchia, Antonio -- 077092/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 084113/Z/07/Z/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 084378/Z/07/A/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 084535/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 084538/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 092654/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 092741/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 099811/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2016 Jan 7;529(7584):105-9. doi: 10.1038/nature16450. Epub 2015 Dec 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Universita della Svizzera Italiana, Via Vincenzo Vela 6, 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland. ; KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, CGMRC, PO Box 230, 80108 Kilifi, Kenya. ; Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK. ; Institute for Microbiology, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 10, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland. ; Humabs BioMed SA, 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26700814" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry/genetics/*immunology/therapeutic use ; *Antibody Specificity ; Antigenic Variation/*immunology ; Antigens, Protozoan/*immunology ; B-Lymphocytes/cytology/immunology ; Clone Cells/cytology/immunology ; Collagen/immunology/metabolism ; Conserved Sequence/immunology ; DNA Transposable Elements/genetics/immunology ; Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/chemistry/immunology ; Erythrocytes/immunology/metabolism/parasitology ; Humans ; Kenya ; Malaria/*immunology/parasitology ; Malaria Vaccines/chemistry/immunology ; Membrane Proteins/chemistry/immunology ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutagenesis, Insertional/*genetics ; Plasmodium falciparum/*immunology ; Protein Structure, Tertiary/genetics ; Protozoan Proteins/chemistry/immunology ; Receptors, Immunologic/chemistry/genetics/*immunology/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-07-30
    Description: The isolation of broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza A viruses has been a long-sought goal for therapeutic approaches and vaccine design. Using a single-cell culture method for screening large numbers of human plasma cells, we isolated a neutralizing monoclonal antibody that recognized the hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein of all 16 subtypes and neutralized both group 1 and group 2 influenza A viruses. Passive transfer of this antibody conferred protection to mice and ferrets. Complexes with HAs from the group 1 H1 and the group 2 H3 subtypes analyzed by x-ray crystallography showed that the antibody bound to a conserved epitope in the F subdomain. This antibody may be used for passive protection and to inform vaccine design because of its broad specificity and neutralization potency.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Corti, Davide -- Voss, Jarrod -- Gamblin, Steven J -- Codoni, Giosiana -- Macagno, Annalisa -- Jarrossay, David -- Vachieri, Sebastien G -- Pinna, Debora -- Minola, Andrea -- Vanzetta, Fabrizia -- Silacci, Chiara -- Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca M -- Agatic, Gloria -- Bianchi, Siro -- Giacchetto-Sasselli, Isabella -- Calder, Lesley -- Sallusto, Federica -- Collins, Patrick -- Haire, Lesley F -- Temperton, Nigel -- Langedijk, Johannes P M -- Skehel, John J -- Lanzavecchia, Antonio -- G0600369/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- MC_U117584222/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Aug 12;333(6044):850-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1205669. Epub 2011 Jul 28.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute for Research in Biomedicine, 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21798894" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/*immunology/isolation & purification ; Antibodies, Viral/*immunology/isolation & purification ; Antibody Specificity ; Antigens, Viral/*immunology ; Cells, Cultured ; Cross Reactions ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Epitopes/immunology ; Ferrets ; Glycosylation ; Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus/*immunology ; Humans ; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions ; Immunization, Passive ; Immunoglobulin Variable Region/immunology ; Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology ; Influenza A virus/*immunology ; Influenza B virus/immunology ; Influenza, Human/immunology ; Mice ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Orthomyxoviridae Infections/immunology/prevention & control/therapy ; Plasma Cells/immunology ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Structure, Secondary
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2015-07-15
    Description: Human inborn errors of immunity mediated by the cytokines interleukin-17A and interleukin-17F (IL-17A/F) underlie mucocutaneous candidiasis, whereas inborn errors of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) immunity underlie mycobacterial disease. We report the discovery of bi-allelic RORC loss-of-function mutations in seven individuals from three kindreds of different ethnic origins with both candidiasis and mycobacteriosis. The lack of functional RORgamma and RORgammaT isoforms resulted in the absence of IL-17A/F-producing T cells in these individuals, probably accounting for their chronic candidiasis. Unexpectedly, leukocytes from RORgamma- and RORgammaT-deficient individuals also displayed an impaired IFN-gamma response to Mycobacterium. This principally reflected profoundly defective IFN-gamma production by circulating gammadelta T cells and CD4(+)CCR6(+)CXCR3(+) alphabeta T cells. In humans, both mucocutaneous immunity to Candida and systemic immunity to Mycobacterium require RORgamma, RORgammaT, or both.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4668938/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4668938/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Okada, Satoshi -- Markle, Janet G -- Deenick, Elissa K -- Mele, Federico -- Averbuch, Dina -- Lagos, Macarena -- Alzahrani, Mohammed -- Al-Muhsen, Saleh -- Halwani, Rabih -- Ma, Cindy S -- Wong, Natalie -- Soudais, Claire -- Henderson, Lauren A -- Marzouqa, Hiyam -- Shamma, Jamal -- Gonzalez, Marcela -- Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben -- Okada, Chizuru -- Avery, Danielle T -- Latorre, Daniela -- Deswarte, Caroline -- Jabot-Hanin, Fabienne -- Torrado, Egidio -- Fountain, Jeffrey -- Belkadi, Aziz -- Itan, Yuval -- Boisson, Bertrand -- Migaud, Melanie -- Arlehamn, Cecilia S Lindestam -- Sette, Alessandro -- Breton, Sylvain -- McCluskey, James -- Rossjohn, Jamie -- de Villartay, Jean-Pierre -- Moshous, Despina -- Hambleton, Sophie -- Latour, Sylvain -- Arkwright, Peter D -- Picard, Capucine -- Lantz, Olivier -- Engelhard, Dan -- Kobayashi, Masao -- Abel, Laurent -- Cooper, Andrea M -- Notarangelo, Luigi D -- Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie -- Puel, Anne -- Sallusto, Federica -- Bustamante, Jacinta -- Tangye, Stuart G -- Casanova, Jean-Laurent -- 8UL1TR000043/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- HHSN272200900044C/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- HHSN272200900044C/PHS HHS/ -- R37 AI095983/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R37AI095983/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI007512/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Canadian Institutes of Health Research/Canada -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Aug 7;349(6248):606-13. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa4282. Epub 2015 Jul 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Rockefeller Branch, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. Department of Pediatrics, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima, Japan. ; St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Rockefeller Branch, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. jmarkle@rockefeller.edu jean-laurent.casanova@rockefeller.edu. ; Immunology Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. St Vincent's Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ; Institute for Research in Biomedicine, University of Italian Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland. ; Department of Pediatrics, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. ; Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Universidad de Valparaiso, Santiago, Chile. Department of Pediatrics, Padre Hurtado Hospital and Clinica Alemana, Santiago, Chile. ; Department of Pediatrics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ; Department of Pediatrics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Department of Pediatrics, Prince Naif Center for Immunology Research, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ; Department of Pediatrics, Prince Naif Center for Immunology Research, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. ; Immunology Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. ; Institut Curie, INSERM U932, Paris, France. ; Division of Immunology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Caritas Baby Hospital, Post Office Box 11535, Jerusalem, Israel. ; Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Universidad de Valparaiso, Santiago, Chile. ; St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Rockefeller Branch, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. ; Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Necker Branch, INSERM UMR 1163, Paris, France. Paris Descartes University, Imagine Institute, Paris, France. ; Trudeau Institute, Saranac Lake, NY 12983, USA. ; La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. ; Department of Radiology, Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Necker Hospital for Sick Children, Paris, France. ; Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Advanced Molecular Imaging, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. Institute of Infection and Immunity, Cardiff University, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK. ; Laboratoire Dynamique du Genome et Systeme Immunitaire, INSERM UMR 1163, Universite Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris, France. ; Laboratoire Dynamique du Genome et Systeme Immunitaire, INSERM UMR 1163, Universite Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris, France. Pediatric Hematology-Immunology Unit, AP-HP, Necker Hospital for Sick Children, Paris, France. ; Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University and Great North Children's Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 6BE, UK. ; Laboratory of Lymphocyte Activation and Susceptibility to EBV Infection, INSERM UMR 1163, Universite Paris Descartes-Sorbonne Paris Cite, Imagine Institute, Paris, France. ; Department of Paediatric Allergy Immunology, University of Manchester, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, Manchester, UK. ; St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Rockefeller Branch, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Necker Branch, INSERM UMR 1163, Paris, France. Paris Descartes University, Imagine Institute, Paris, France. Pediatric Hematology-Immunology Unit, AP-HP, Necker Hospital for Sick Children, Paris, France. Center for the Study of Primary Immunodeficiencies, AP-HP, Necker Hospital for Sick Children, Paris, France. ; Department of Pediatrics, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima, Japan. ; St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Rockefeller Branch, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Necker Branch, INSERM UMR 1163, Paris, France. Paris Descartes University, Imagine Institute, Paris, France. ; Division of Immunology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Manton Center for Orphan Disease Research, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Institute for Research in Biomedicine, University of Italian Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland. Center of Medical Immunology, Institute for Research in Biomedicine, University of Italian Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland. ; St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Rockefeller Branch, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Necker Branch, INSERM UMR 1163, Paris, France. Paris Descartes University, Imagine Institute, Paris, France. Center for the Study of Primary Immunodeficiencies, AP-HP, Necker Hospital for Sick Children, Paris, France. ; St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Rockefeller Branch, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, Necker Branch, INSERM UMR 1163, Paris, France. Paris Descartes University, Imagine Institute, Paris, France. Pediatric Hematology-Immunology Unit, AP-HP, Necker Hospital for Sick Children, Paris, France. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, New York, NY 10065, USA. jmarkle@rockefeller.edu jean-laurent.casanova@rockefeller.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26160376" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Animals ; Candida albicans/*immunology ; Candidiasis, Chronic Mucocutaneous/complications/*genetics/immunology ; Cattle ; Child ; Child, Preschool ; DNA Mutational Analysis ; Exome/genetics ; Female ; Gene Rearrangement, alpha-Chain T-Cell Antigen Receptor ; Humans ; Immunity/*genetics ; Interferon-gamma/immunology ; Interleukin-17/immunology ; Mice ; Mutation ; Mycobacterium bovis/immunology/isolation & purification ; Mycobacterium tuberculosis/immunology/isolation & purification ; Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group F, Member 3/*genetics ; Pedigree ; Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, alpha-beta/genetics/immunology ; Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta/genetics/immunology ; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency/*genetics ; T-Lymphocytes/immunology ; Thymus Gland/abnormalities/immunology ; Tuberculosis, Bovine/*genetics/immunology ; Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/*genetics/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-04-03
    Description: IL-17-producing CD4+ T helper cells (TH17) have been extensively investigated in mouse models of autoimmunity. However, the requirements for differentiation and the properties of pathogen-induced human TH17 cells remain poorly defined. Using an approach that combines the in vitro priming of naive T cells with the ex vivo analysis of memory T cells, we describe here two types of human TH17 cells with distinct effector function and differentiation requirements. Candida albicans-specific TH17 cells produced IL-17 and IFN-gamma, but no IL-10, whereas Staphylococcus aureus-specific TH17 cells produced IL-17 and could produce IL-10 upon restimulation. IL-6, IL-23 and IL-1beta contributed to TH17 differentiation induced by both pathogens, but IL-1beta was essential in C. albicans-induced TH17 differentiation to counteract the inhibitory activity of IL-12 and to prime IL-17/IFN-gamma double-producing cells. In addition, IL-1beta inhibited IL-10 production in differentiating and in memory TH17 cells, whereas blockade of IL-1beta in vivo led to increased IL-10 production by memory TH17 cells. We also show that, after restimulation, TH17 cells transiently downregulated IL-17 production through a mechanism that involved IL-2-induced activation of STAT5 and decreased expression of ROR-gammat. Taken together these findings demonstrate that by eliciting different cytokines C. albicans and S. aureus prime TH17 cells that produce either IFN-gamma or IL-10, and identify IL-1beta and IL-2 as pro- and anti-inflammatory regulators of TH17 cells both at priming and in the effector phase.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zielinski, Christina E -- Mele, Federico -- Aschenbrenner, Dominik -- Jarrossay, David -- Ronchi, Francesca -- Gattorno, Marco -- Monticelli, Silvia -- Lanzavecchia, Antonio -- Sallusto, Federica -- England -- Nature. 2012 Apr 26;484(7395):514-8. doi: 10.1038/nature10957.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Via Vincenzo Vela 6, 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland. christina.zielinski@charite.de〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22466287" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Antigen Presentation/immunology ; Candida albicans/*immunology ; Cell Differentiation ; Down-Regulation ; Humans ; Immunologic Memory/immunology ; Interferon-gamma/*biosynthesis ; Interleukin-10/*biosynthesis ; Interleukin-17/biosynthesis ; Interleukin-1beta/*immunology ; Interleukin-2/antagonists & inhibitors/immunology ; Lymphocyte Activation ; Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group F, Member 3/genetics/metabolism ; STAT5 Transcription Factor/metabolism ; Staphylococcus aureus/*immunology ; Th17 Cells/cytology/*immunology/*metabolism/secretion ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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