Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPERIENCE ; COMPLICATIONS
    Abstract: PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that MRI-TRUS fusion technique can increase the detection rate of prostate cancer (PC) in patients with previously negative biopsy. METHODS: Patient records of men with persisting suspicion for PC after previous negative biopsy having undergone either extensive transrectal prostate biopsies (MD Anderson protocol; MDA), transperineal saturation (STP) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) fusion transperineal biopsies (MTTP) in three consecutive time intervals were reviewed retrospectively. The respective approach was the standard for the above indication at these episodes. In Cambridge, 70 patients underwent MDA biopsies, 75 STP underwent biopsies and 74 patients underwent MTTP biopsies. In total, 164 MTTP patients with the same indication from Heidelberg were analysed as reference standard. In total, 383 men were included into analysis. Low-grade PC was defined as Gleason score 7 (3 + 4) or lower. RESULTS: Even though MTTP patients had significantly larger prostates, the overall cancer detection rate for PC was the highest in MTTP (24.2 % MDA, 41.3 % STP, 44.5 % MTTP, p = 0.027, Kruskal-Wallis test). The detection rate for clinically relevant high-grade PC was highest in MTTP; however, this did not reach statistical significance compared with MDA (23.5 % MDA, 12.9 % STP, 27.2 % MTTP, p = 0.25, Fischer's exact test). Comparing MTTP between Cambridge and Heidelberg, detection rates did not differ significantly (44.5 vs. 48 %, p = 0.58). There was a higher detection rate of high-grade cancer in Heidelberg. (36.3 vs. 27.2 %, p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Patients whom are considered for repeat biopsies may benefit from undergoing MRI-targeted TRUS fusion technique due to higher cancer detection rate of significant PC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24917295
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1438-3888
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Due to the geographical location and paleobiogeography of the Canary Islands, the seaweed flora contains macroalgae with different distributional patterns. In this contribution, the biogeographical relations of several new records of deep-water macroalgae recently collected around the Canarian archipelago are discussed. These areBryopsidella neglecta (Berthold) Rietema,Discosporangium mesarthrocarpum (Meneghini) Hauck,Hincksia onslowensis (Amsler et Kapraun) P. C. Silva,Syringoderma floridana Henry,Peyssonnelia harveyana J. Agardh,Cryptonemia seminervis (C. Agardh) J. Agardh,Botryocladia wynnei Ballantine,Gloiocladia blomquistii (Searles) R. E. Norris,Halichrysis peltata (W. R. Taylor) P. Huvé et H. Huvé,Leptofauchea brasiliensis Joly, andSarcodiotheca divaricata W. R. Taylor. These new records, especially those in the Florideophyceae, support the strong affinity of the Canary Islands seaweed flora with the warm-temperate Mediterranean-Atlantic region. Some species are recorded for the first time from the east coast of the Atlantic Ocean, enhancing the biogeographic relations of the Canarian marine flora with that of the western Atlantic regions.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-06-11
    Description: Retroviral integration is catalysed by a tetramer of integrase (IN) assembled on viral DNA ends in a stable complex, known as the intasome. How the intasome interfaces with chromosomal DNA, which exists in the form of nucleosomal arrays, is currently unknown. Here we show that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) intasome is proficient at stable capture of nucleosomes as targets for integration. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reveals a multivalent intasome-nucleosome interface involving both gyres of nucleosomal DNA and one H2A-H2B heterodimer. While the histone octamer remains intact, the DNA is lifted from the surface of the H2A-H2B heterodimer to allow integration at strongly preferred superhelix location +/-3.5 positions. Amino acid substitutions disrupting these contacts impinge on the ability of the intasome to engage nucleosomes in vitro and redistribute viral integration sites on the genomic scale. Our findings elucidate the molecular basis for nucleosome capture by the viral DNA recombination machinery and the underlying nucleosome plasticity that allows integration.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4530500/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4530500/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Maskell, Daniel P -- Renault, Ludovic -- Serrao, Erik -- Lesbats, Paul -- Matadeen, Rishi -- Hare, Stephen -- Lindemann, Dirk -- Engelman, Alan N -- Costa, Alessandro -- Cherepanov, Peter -- P50 GM082251-06/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI070042/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI070042-08/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jul 16;523(7560):366-9. doi: 10.1038/nature14495. Epub 2015 Jun 10.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Chromatin Structure and Mobile DNA, The Francis Crick Institute, Blanche Lane, South Mimms EN6 3LD, UK. ; 1] Architecture and Dynamics of Macromolecular Machines, Clare Hall Laboratories, The Francis Crick Institute, Blanche Lane, South Mimms EN6 3LD, UK [2] National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, Microscopy and Imaging, Blanche Lane, South Mimms EN6 3QG, UK. ; Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; NeCEN, Gorlaeus Laboratory, Einsteinweg 55, Leiden, 2333, the Netherlands. ; Division of Medicine, Imperial College London, St-Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK. ; Institute of Virology, Technische Universitat Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, Dresden 01307, Germany. ; Architecture and Dynamics of Macromolecular Machines, Clare Hall Laboratories, The Francis Crick Institute, Blanche Lane, South Mimms EN6 3LD, UK. ; 1] Chromatin Structure and Mobile DNA, The Francis Crick Institute, Blanche Lane, South Mimms EN6 3LD, UK [2] Division of Medicine, Imperial College London, St-Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26061770" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Substitution ; Binding Sites/genetics ; Cryoelectron Microscopy ; DNA/genetics/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Genome/genetics ; Histones/chemistry/metabolism/ultrastructure ; Integrases/metabolism ; Models, Molecular ; Nucleosomes/*chemistry/genetics/ultrastructure/*virology ; Protein Multimerization ; Recombination, Genetic ; Spumavirus/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism/ultrastructure ; *Virus Integration
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...