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  • 1
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; PATHWAY ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; prostate cancer ; nutrition ; FOXO TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS ; forkhead box ; genetic variability ; HUMAN LONGEVITY ; SIRT1
    Abstract: Forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) has a wide range of functions: it promotes tumor suppression, cell cycle arrest, repair of damaged DNA, detoxification of reactive oxygen species, apoptosis and plays a pivotal role in promoting longevity. FOXO3 is a key downstream target of the PI3K-Akt pathway in response to cellular stimulation by growth factors or insulin and has been proposed as a bridge between ageing and tumor suppression. Three SNPs in the FOXO3 gene (rs3800231, rs9400239 and rs479744) that have been shown to be strongly and consistently associated with longevity, were examined in relation to PC risk in a case control study of 1571 incident PC cases and 1840 controls nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). There was no statistically significant association between the SNPs and PC risk regardless of the model of inheritance (dominant, codominant and recessive). The associations were not modified by disease aggressiveness, circulating levels of steroid sex hormones, or IGFs or BMI. We conclude that polymorphisms in the FOXO3 gene that are associated with longevity are not major risk factors for PC risk, in this population of Caucasian men
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21725602
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  • 2
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To identify reproductive, lifestyle, hormonal, and other correlates of circulating antimullerian hormone (AMH) concentrations in mostly late premenopausal women. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Not applicable. PATIENT(S): A total of 671 premenopausal women not known to have cancer. INTERVENTION(S): None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Concentrations of AMH were measured in a single laboratory using the picoAMH ELISA. Multivariable-adjusted median (and interquartile range) AMH concentrations were calculated using quantile regression for several potential correlates. RESULT(S): Older women had significantly lower AMH concentrations (〉/=40 [n = 444] vs. 〈35 years [n = 64], multivariable-adjusted median 0.73 ng/mL vs. 2.52 ng/mL). Concentrations of AMH were also significantly lower among women with earlier age at menarche (〈12 [n = 96] vs. 〉/=14 years [n = 200]: 0.90 ng/mL vs. 1.12 ng/mL) and among current users of oral contraceptives (n = 27) compared with never or former users (n = 468) (0.36 ng/mL vs. 1.15 ng/mL). Race, body mass index, education, height, smoking status, parity, and menstrual cycle phase were not significantly associated with AMH concentrations. There were no significant associations between AMH concentrations and androgen or sex hormone-binding globulin concentrations or with factors related to blood collection (e.g., sample type, time, season, and year of blood collection). CONCLUSION(S): Among premenopausal women, lower AMH concentrations are associated with older age, a younger age at menarche, and currently using oral contraceptives, suggesting these factors are related to a lower number or decreased secretory activity of ovarian follicles.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 28366409
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  • 3
    Keywords: EXPOSURE ; BIOMARKERS ; BREAST ; HUMANS ; smoking ; VALIDITY ; ENDOMETRIAL ; HEMOGLOBIN ADDUCTS ; glycidamide
    Abstract: Acrylamide, classified in 1994 by IARC as 'probably carcinogenic' to humans, was discovered in 2002 in some heat-treated, carbohydrate-rich foods. The association between dietary acrylamide intake and epithelial ovarian cancer risk (EOC) has been previously studied in one case-control and three prospective cohort studies which obtained inconsistent results, and could not further examine histological subtypes other than serous EOC. The present study was carried out in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) sub-cohort of women (n=325,006). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between questionnaire-based acrylamide intake and EOC risk. Acrylamide was energy-adjusted using the residual method, and was evaluated both as a continuous variable (per 10microg/day) and in quintiles; when subgroups by histological EOC subtypes were analyzed, acrylamide intake was evaluated in quartiles. During a mean follow-up of 11 years, 1,191 incident EOC cases were diagnosed. At baseline, the median acrylamide intake in EPIC was 21.3 mug/day. No associations, and no evidence for a dose-response were observed between energy-adjusted acrylamide intake and EOC risk (HR10microg/day:1.02, 95%CI:0.96-1.09; HRQ5vsQ1:0.97, 95%CI:0.76-1.23). No differences were seen when invasive EOC subtypes (582 serous, 118 endometrioid, and 79 mucinous tumors) were analyzed separately. This study did not provide evidence that acrylamide intake, based on food intake questionnaires, was associated with risk for EOC in EPIC. Additional studies with more reliable estimates of exposure based on biomarkers may be needed.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25300475
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; THERAPY ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; RISKS ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; hormone ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; cancer risk ; FIBER ; MEASUREMENT ERROR ; DIET ; DIETARY ; FAT ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; AUSTRALIA ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; RELATIVE RISK ; dietary fiber ; insulin ; IGF-I ; ASSOCIATIONS ; ENDOMETRIAL ; THERAPIES ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; LEVEL ; INTERVAL ; USA ; prospective ; INSULIN SENSITIVITY ; VARIABLES ; CANCER-RISK ; C-PEPTIDE ; FOODS ; Nutrition Assessment ; postmenopausal ; DIANA RANDOMIZED-TRIAL ; dietary carbohydrates ; endometrial neoplasms ; glycemic index ; IOWA WOMENS HEALTH
    Abstract: The associations of dietary total carbohydrates, overall glycemic index, total dietary glycemic load, total sugars, total starch, and total fiber with endometrial cancer risk were analyzed among 288,428 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort (1992-2004), including 710 incident cases diagnosed during a mean 6.4 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. There were no statistically significant associations with endometrial cancer risk for increasing quartile intakes of any of the exposure variables. However, in continuous models calibrated by using 24-hour recall values, the multivariable relative risks were 1.61 (95% confidence interval: 1.06, 2.45) per 100 g/day of total carbohydrates, 1.40 (95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.99) per 50 units/day of total dietary glycemic load, and 1.36 (95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.76) per 50 g/day of total sugars. These associations were stronger among women who had never used postmenopausal hormone therapy compared with ever users (total carbohydrates P-heterogeneity = 0.04). Data suggest no association of overall glycemic index, total starch, and total fiber with risk, and a possible modest positive association of total carbohydrates, total dietary glycemic load, and total sugars with risk, particularly among never users of hormone replacement therapy
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17670911
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; Germany ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; INFECTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; REDUCED RISK ; risk factors ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; DIET ; STOMACH ; adenocarcinoma ; case-control studies ; TOBACCO ; ALCOHOL ; CARDIA ; EPIC ; ESOPHAGUS ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; STOMACH-CANCER ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; DIGESTIVE-TRACT ; gastric cancer ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; methods ; PROFILES ; prospective ; EVALUATE ; odds ratio ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; Helicobacter pylori ; cardia cancer ; socioeconomic position
    Abstract: Objectives To evaluate the association of socioeconomic position with adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus and stomach. Methods The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort comprises about 520000 participants mostly aged 35-70 years. Information on diet and lifestyle was collected at recruitment. After an average follow-up of 6.5 years, 268 cases with adenocarcinoma of the stomach and 56 of the oesophagus were confirmed. We examined the effect of socioeconomic position on cancer risk by means of educational data and a computed Relative Index of Inequality (RII). In a nested case-control study, adjustment for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection was performed. Results Higher education was significantly associated with a reduced risk of gastric cancer [vs lowest level of education, hazard ratio (HR): 0.64, 95% Confidence intervals (CI): 0.43-0.981. This effect was more pronounced for cancer of the cardia (HR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.20-0.89) as compared to non-cardia gastric cancer (HR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.36-1.22). Additionally, the inverse association of educational level and gastric cancer was stronger for cases with intestinal (extreme categories, HR: 0.13, 95% CI: 0.04-0.44) rather than diffuse histological subtype (extreme categories, HR: 0.71 95% CI: 0.37-1.40). In the nested case-control study, inverse but statistically non-significant associations were found after additional adjustment for H. pylori infection [highest vs lowest level of education: Odds ratio (OR) 0.53, 95% CI: 0.24-1.18]. Educational level was non-significantly, inversely associated with carcinoma of the oesophagus. Conclusion A higher socioeconomic position was associated with a reduced risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, which was strongest for cardia cancer or intestinal histological subtype, suggesting different risk profiles according to educational level. These effects appear to be explained only partially by established risk factors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17227779
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SUPPORT ; DEATH ; RISK ; RISKS ; TIME ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; RECRUITMENT ; PREDICTION ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; RELATIVE RISK ; BODIES ; REGRESSION ; WEIGHT ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; LEVEL ; analysis ; methods ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY ; alcohol consumption ; USA ; prospective ; BMI ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION ; MEDICINE ; NOV ; body mass ; RATIO ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; PREDICTING MORTALITY ; ROC CURVE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND Previous studies have relied predominantly on the body-mass index (BMI, the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) to assess the association of adiposity with the risk of death, but few have examined whether the distribution of body fat contributes to the prediction of death. METHODS We examined the association of BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with the risk of death among 359,387 participants from nine countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We used a Cox regression analysis, with age as the time variable, and stratified the models according to study center and age at recruitment, with further adjustment for educational level, smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and height. RESULTS During a mean follow-up of 9.7 years, 14,723 participants died. The lowest risks of death related to BMI were observed at a BMI of 25.3 for men and 24.3 for women. After adjustment for BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were strongly associated with the risk of death. Relative risks among men and women in the highest quintile of waist circumference were 2.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.80 to 2.33) and 1.78 (95% CI, 1.56 to 2.04), respectively, and in the highest quintile of waist-to-hip ratio, the relative risks were 1.68 (95% CI, 1.53 to 1.84) and 1.51 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.66), respectively. BMI remained significantly associated with the risk of death in models that included waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio (P〈0.001). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that both general adiposity and abdominal adiposity are associated with the risk of death and support the use of waist circumference or waist-tohip ratio in addition to BMI in assessing the risk of death
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19005195
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; POPULATION ; RISK ; MARKER ; BIOMARKERS ; colon ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FRANCE ; COLON-CANCER ; MULTIVARIATE ; UNITED-STATES ; case-control studies ; GLUCOSE ; nutrition ; BETA-CELL FUNCTION ; ONCOLOGY ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; RE ; INCREASE ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; metabolic syndrome ; USA ; prospective ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; NOV ; HEMOGLOBIN ; TYPE-2 DIABETES-MELLITUS ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; CHRONIC OXIDATIVE STRESS ; GLUCOSE TOXICITY ; RECTAL CANCERS ; SERUM C-PEPTIDE
    Abstract: Although large-scale prospective cohort studies have related hyperglycemia to increased risk of cancer overall, studies specifically on colorectal cancer have been generally small. We investigated the association between prediagnostic levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a marker for average glucose level in blood, and colorectal cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. One thousand and twenty-six incident colorectal cancer cases (561 men and 465 women) and 1,026 matched controls were eligible for the study. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORS) adjusted for possible confounders. Increasing HbA1c percentages were statistically significantly associated with a mild increase in colorectal cancer risk in the whole population [OR, 1.10; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01,1.19 for a 10% increase in HbA1c]. In women, increasing HbA1c percentages were associated with a statistically significant increase in colorectal cancer risk (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.32 for a 10% increase in HbA1c) and with a borderline statistically significant increase in rectum cancer (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.99,1.50 for a 10% increase in HbA1c). No significant association with cancer risk was observed in men. The results of the current study suggest a mild implication of hyperglycemia in colorectal cancer, which seems more important in women than in men, and more for cancer of the rectum than of the colon. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17(11):3108-15)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18990751
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; SUPPORT ; COHORT ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; EXPOSURE ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; TIME ; POLYMORPHISMS ; hippocampus ; CARE ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; smoking ; RATES ; DAMAGE ; RISK FACTOR ; PREVALENCE ; LIPID-PEROXIDATION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CORTEX ; USA ; prospective ; INCREASED RISK ; RISK-FACTOR ; lipid ; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis ; INVESTIGATE ; 33 ; FORMALDEHYDE ; SPORADIC ALS
    Abstract: Objective: Cigarette smoking has been reported as "probable" risk factor for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a poorly understood disease in terms of aetiology. The extensive longitudinal data of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) were used to evaluate age-specific mortality rates from ALS and the role of cigarette smoking on the risk of dying from ALS. Methods: A total of 517,890 healthy subjects were included, resulting in 4,591,325 person-years. ALS cases were ascertained through death certificates. Cox hazard models were built to investigate the role of smoking on the risk of ALS, using packs/years and smoking duration to study dose-response. Results: A total of 118 subjects died from ALS, resulting in a crude mortality rate of 2.69 per 100,000/year. Current smokers at recruitment had an almost two-fold increased risk of dying from ALS compared to never smokers (HR = 1.89, 95% C.I. 1.14-3.14), while former smokers at the time of enrolment had a 50% increased risk (HR = 1.48, 95% C.I. 0.94-2-32). The number of years spent smoking increased the risk of ALS (p for trend = 0.002). Those who smoked more than 33 years had more than a two-fold increased risk of ALS compared with never smokers (HR = 2.16, 95% C.I. 1.33-3.53). Conversely, the number of years since quitting smoking was associated with a decreased risk of ALS compared with continuing smoking. Interpretation: These results strongly support the hypothesis of a role of cigarette smoking in aetiology of ALS. We hypothesize that this could occur through lipid peroxidation via formaldehyde exposure. Ann Neurol 2009;65:378-385
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19399866
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; PATHWAY ; RISK ; GENE ; PROTEIN ; METABOLISM ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; BREAST-CANCER ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; PHENOTYPE ; insulin ; ONCOLOGY ; NUTRITIONAL REGULATION ; GROWTH-FACTOR (IGF)-I ; IGF-BINDING-PROTEINS ; SUPPRESSES ; Fatty acid synthase ; NF-Y ; Susceptibility to cancer
    Abstract: A western lifestyle, characterised by low rates of energy expenditure and a high-energy diet rich in animal protein, saturated fats and refined carbohydrates, is associated with high incidence of prostate cancer in men. A high-energy nutritional status results in insulin/IGF signalling in cells, which in turn stimulates synthesis of fatty acids. We investigated whether the genetic variability of the genes belonging to the fatty acid synthesis pathway is related to prostate cancer risk in 815 prostate cancer cases and 1266 controls from the European Prospective Investigation on Cancer (EPIC). Using a tagging approach and selecting 252 SNPs in 22 genes, we covered all the common genetic variation of this pathway. None of the SNPs reached statistical significance after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Common SNPs in the fatty acid synthase pathway are not major contributors to prostate cancer risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20965718
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  • 10
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; RAGE ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; SPLICE VARIANTS
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptors (RAGE) have been implicated in cancer development through their proinflammatory capabilities. However, prospective data on their association with cancer of specific sites, including pancreatic cancer, are limited. METHODS: Prediagnostic blood levels of the AGE product Nepsilon-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and the endogenous secreted receptor for AGE (esRAGE) were measured using ELISA in 454 patients with exocrine pancreatic cancer and individually matched controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Pancreatic cancer risk was estimated by calculating ORs with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Elevated CML levels tended to be associated with a reduction in pancreatic cancer risk [OR = 0.57 (95% CI, 0.32-1.01) comparing highest with lowest quintile), whereas no association was observed for esRAGE (OR = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.62-1.54). Adjustments for body mass index and smoking attenuated the inverse associations of CML with pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.41-1.49). There was an inverse association between esRAGE and risk of pancreatic cancer for cases that were diagnosed within the first 2 years of follow-up [OR = 0.46 (95% CI, 0.22-0.96) for a doubling in concentration], whereas there was no association among those with a longer follow-up (OR = 1.11; 95% CI, 0.88-1.39; P(interaction) = 0.002). Conclusions and Impact: Our results do not provide evidence for an association of higher CML or lower esRAGE levels with risk of pancreatic cancer. The role of AGE/RAGE in pancreatic cancer would benefit from further investigations. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 21(4); 619-28. (c)2012 AACR.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22301828
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