Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Copenhagen : Munksgaard International Publishers
    ISSN: 1600-051X
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Background, aims: Conventional mechanical treatment of Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome periodontitis has a poor prognosis. This report describes an effective antimicrobial treatment of rapidly progressing periodontitis in an 11-year old girl having Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome.Method: Clinical examination included conventional periodontal measurements and radiographic analysis. Occurrence of major suspected periodontopathic bacteria was determined by selective and non-selective culture and by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification. Presence of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr type 1 virus was determined by a nested-PCR detection method. Therapy included scaling and root planing, oral hygiene instruction, and systemic amoxicillin-metronidazole therapy (250 mg of each/3 times daily/10 days) which, based on follow-up microbiological testing, was repeated after 4 months. Supportive periodontal therapy took place at 2 visits during a 16-month period.Results: At baseline, 10 of 22 available teeth demonstrated severe periodontal breakdown. At 16 months, probing and radiographic measurements revealed no teeth with additional attachment loss, and several teeth exhibited significant reduction in gingivitis and pocket depth, increase in radiographic alveolar bone height and clinical attachment level, and radiographic evidence of crestal lamina dura. Baseline subgingival microbiota included Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (3.4% of total isolates), Prevotella nigrescens (16.4%), Fusobacteriumnucleatum (14.3%) and Peptostreptococcus micros (10.6%), as well as cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr type 1 virus. At termination of the study, culture and PCR examinations showed absence of A. actinomycetemcomitans,P. micros and herpesviruses, and P. nigrescens and F.nucleatum each comprised less than 0.1 % of subgingival isolates.Conclusion: This study suggests that controlling the periodontopathic microbiota by appropriate antibiotic and conventional periodontal therapy can arrest Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome periodontitis.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1600-051X
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract. Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome patients exhibit hyperkeratosis palmoplantaris and severe periodontitis. The syndrome is an autosomal recessive trait, but the mechanism of periodontal destruction is not known. This report presents the clinical and microbiological features of an 11-year old girl with Papillon-Lefěvre syndrome. Clinical examination included conventional periodontal measurements and radiographic analysis. In samples from 3 deep periodontal lesions, the occurrence of major suspected periodontopathic bacteria was determined by selective and non-selective culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) identification, and the presence of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr type 1 virus by a nested-PCR detection method. 10 of 22 available teeth demonstrated severe periodontal breakdown. Major cultivable bacteria included Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (3.4% of total isolates), Prevotella nigrescens (16.4%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (14.3%) and Peptostreptococcus micros (10.6%). A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. nigrescens, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Eikenella corrodens were identified by PCR analysis. The patient's non-affected parents and older brother revealed several periodontal pathogens but not A. actinomycetemcomitans. The viral examination demonstrated cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr type 1 virus in the subgingival sample of the Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome patient. The father and brother yielded subgingival cytomegalovirus but not Epstein-Barr type 1 virus. We hypothesize that human herpesviruses in concert with A. actinomycetemcomitans play important rǒles in the development of Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome periodontitis.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    ISSN: 1600-0765
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Objectives and background: Povidone-iodine [polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine complex (PVP-iodine)] might constitute a valuable adjunct to current periodontal therapy because of its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, low potential for developing resistance and adverse reactions, wide availability, ease of use, and low financial cost. This investigation employed a randomized, split-mouth study design to determine the microbiological and clinical effects of 10% PVP-iodine subgingival irrigation in periodontitis lesions showing radiographic evidence of subgingival calculus.Methods: Sixteen adults having at least one periodontal pocket of 6 mm or more in each quadrant of the dentition and harboring one or more periodontopathic bacteria participated in the study. In each subject, a study site in each quadrant was randomly chosen to receive either subgingival irrigation with 10% PVP-iodine together with scaling and root planing, scaling and root planing alone, subgingival irrigation with 10% PVP-iodine, or subgingival irrigation with sterile saline. Prior to therapy and at 5 weeks post-treatment, microbiological culture was carried out without knowledge of the clinical status or the type of treatment rendered. A blinded clinical examiner determined presence of dental plaque, probing pocket depth, and gingival bleeding on probing. Microbiological and clinical data were analyzed using a repeated measures analysis of variance and Kruskal–Wallis rank test with the Tukey and Mann–Whitney post hoc tests.Results: At 5 weeks post-treatment, subgingival irrigation with PVP-iodine together with scaling and root planing caused a 95% or greater reduction in total pathogen counts in 44% of pockets having ≥ 6 mm depth whereas scaling and root planing alone, povidone-iodine irrigation alone and water irrigation alone caused 95% reduction of total pathogens only in 6–13% of similar study sites (P = 0.02). Reduction in mean pocket depth was 1.8 mm for the PVP-iodine/scaling and root planing group, 1.6 mm for the scaling and root planing group, and 0.9 mm for the PVP-iodine and the saline monotherapy groups, with statistical significance reached for the scaling and root planing group vs. the PVP-iodine group (P = 0.04) and for the scaling and root planing group vs. the saline group (P = 0.02). Reduction in visible dental plaque, which ranged from 38% to 62%, showed no significant differences among treatment groups.Conclusions: The addition of subgingival PVP-iodine irrigation to conventional mechanical therapy may be a cost-effective means of reducing total counts of periodontal pathogens and helping control periodontal disease. However, subgingival irrigation with PVP-iodine without concomitant mechanical debridement might not improve microbiological and clinical variables in comparison with saline irrigation, at least not in sites with radiographic evidence of subgingival calculus.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    ISSN: 1600-0765
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Wolinella recta has been associated with adult periodontitis, but its role in the disease remains uncertain. This report clarifies the distribution of W. recta in periodontally healthy and diseased subjects, and treated patients with recurrent disease. A specific polyclonal rabbit antiserum against W. recta strain 372 was used for indirect immunofluorescence localization of W. recta in dental plaque from untreated and treated patients. Supragingival plaque was collected from 15 periodontally healthy individuals (H), 10 adults with mild gingivitis (G1), 8 with severe gingivitis (G2) and 15 with periodontitis (AP). Subgingival samples from 23 diseased sites (G2 and AP) were examined as well. There was a significant difference (p = 0.000) between the proportions of W. recta in subgingival (4.4%) vs. supragingival (0.3%) plaque samples from AP. A significant difference (p = 0.000) in W. recta proportions was also detected between subgingival plaque samples of AP (4.4%) vs. G2 (1.2%). No significant difference in the mean % of W. recta was found between supragingival plaque of AP (0.3%) and G2 (0%), and samples of G1 (0.01%) and H (0.1%). In a separate study, 85 adults previously treated for moderate to severe adult periodontitis were monitored over a 12-month period for evidence of disease recurrence. Recurrent disease was detected at 32 sites in 18 subjects. Of these, 20 sites in 13 subjects were positive for W. recta. With subjects as the experimental unit, a significant increase in the proportions of W. recta was found at sites with recurrent disease (3.12%) as compared to stable, paired control sites (0.24%), but only when sites with breakdown and positive for W. recta were compared with their controls. These results indicate that W. recta is associated with some, but not all sites with advanced adult periodonlilis. The association of W. recta with gingivitis was not statistically significant.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    ISSN: 1600-0765
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    ISSN: 1600-0765
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Objectives and background:  Members of the herpesvirus family have accumulated considerable support for a role in severe types of periodontitis. This study aimed to examine whether human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), Epstein–Barr virus type 1 (EBV-1) or herpes simplex virus (HSV) together with the major periodontopathic bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis might interact in the pathogenesis of periodontal breakdown.Methods:  Sixteen subjects each contributed paper point samples from two progressing and two stable periodontitis lesions, as determined by ongoing loss of probing attachment. Polymerase chain reaction methodology was used to identify subgingival herpesviruses, P. gingivalis and other bacterial pathogens. Chi-squared tests and multivariate logistic regression were employed to identify statistical associations between herpesviruses, periodontopathic bacteria and clinical variables.Results:  HCMV and HSV were both significant predictors of the presence of subgingival P. gingivalis. In turn, P. gingivalis was positively associated with periodontitis active disease, probing attachment level, probing pocket depth, gingival bleeding upon probing and patient age. EBV-1 was not linked to P. gingivalis, although the virus was predictive of periodontitis active disease. The periodontitis disease risk associated with herpesvirus–P. gingivalis combinations depended on both site-specific and subject-specific factors.Conclusion:  The present data of aggressive periodontitis implicate HCMV, HSV and P. gingivalis as either cofactors in its etiology or triggers of relapses. Further studies are needed to determine the spectrum of periodontopathogenicity of herpesviruses and effective management of these viruses in periodontal sites.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    ISSN: 1600-0765
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Objectives:  To determine the ability of a 10% doxycycline hyclate controlled-release polymer (Atridox®) to suppress periodontopathic bacteria when placed subgingivally following scaling and root planing (Sc/Rp).Methods:  Eight males and seven females, mean age 48 years, with moderate to advanced periodontitis participated in the study. In each patient, bilateral periodontal pockets probing 6–7 mm were randomly assigned to treatment by Sc/Rp + doxycycline polymer or by Sc/Rp alone. Subgingival placement of doxycycline polymer was carried out according to the manufacturer's instructions. Sc/Rp was performed with hand instruments for at least 10 min in each study tooth. Subgingival samples were collected by paper-points at baseline, at 2 weeks and at 4 weeks post-treatment. Culture methodology was used to isolate and identify putative periodontal pathogens, including Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Dialister pneumosintes, Tannerella forsythia, Prevotella intermedia/Prevotella nigrescens, Campylobacter species, Eubacterium species, Fusobacterium species, Peptostreptococcus micros, Eikenella corrodens, Staphylococcus species, enteric gram-negative rods, β-hemolytic streptococci and yeasts. The microbiologic examination was carried out blindly. Microbiological data were analyzed using a General Linear Model Analysis of Variance for within and between group effects.Results:  Sites receiving Sc/Rp + doxycycline polymer and sites receiving Sc/Rp alone exhibited similar levels of periodontal pathogens at baseline and did not differ significantly in total viable counts and proportional recovery of periodontopathic bacteria post-treatment.Conclusions:  Controlled-release doxycycline placed in moderate to deep periodontal pockets caused no significant additional reduction in the subgingival pathogenic microbiota compared to thorough Sc/Rp alone. Since controlled-release doxycycline may not significantly suppress several subgingival pathogenic microorganisms and seems to possess no distinct advantage over broad-spectra, safe and inexpensive antiseptics, the rationale for its employment in periodontal therapy remains unclear.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    ISSN: 1600-0765
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Human herpesviruses, especially cytomegalovirus and Epstein–Barr virus type-1, occur with higher frequency in subgingival specimens from periodontitis lesions than from healthy/gingivitis sites. Little or no information is available on the relationship between herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) and herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) and periodontal disease. This study determined the periodontal occurrence of HHV-6, HHV-7 and HHV-8 in 21 HIV-seropositive and 14 HIV-negative adults affected by periodontitis. Gingival biopsy specimens and paper-point samples of subgingival plaque were collected from sites showing 5 mm or more in probing depth. Nested polymerase chain reaction methodology was employed in herpesvirus identification. In the HIV-seropositive periodontitis group, 90% of gingival biopsies and 62% of subgingival plaque samples revealed at least one of the test viruses. HHV-6 occurred in 71%, HHV-7 in 67% and HHV-8 in 24% of gingival biopsies. In the HIV-negative adult periodontitis group, 43% of gingival biopsies showed at least 1 of the test viruses, with HHV-6 present in 21% and HHV-7 in 29% of gingival biopsies and with no detection of HHV-8. The combined occurrence of the 3 test herpesviruses was significantly higher in HIV-seropositive than in HIV-negative adult periodontitis patients (p=0.008). The human periodontium might constitute a site of infection or reservoir for HHV-6, -7, -8.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Copenhagen : Munksgaard International Publishers
    ISSN: 1600-0501
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: The microflora associated with osseointegrated implants suspected of failing from infection or trauma were evaluated. Of 75 patients examined, 11 demonstrated failing fixtures. 22 of 48 fixtures failed in 6 fully edentulous patients and 10 of 34 failed in 5 partially edentulous patients. The etiology of failure was attributed to infection if there was bleeding, suppuration, pain, high plaque and gingival indices and granulomatous tissue upon surgical removal. Traumatic etiology was suspected in the absence of these signs. Direct phase-contrast microscopy and culture analysis were performed on samples from the implant sulcus, the implant itself and the extraction socket. The 2 failure types exhibited distinct bacteriologic profiles. For implants failing with infection, spirochetes and motile rods averaged 42% of total morphotypes. Many suspected periodontopathic organisms including Peptostreptococcus micros, Fusobacterium species, enteric gram-negative rods and yeasts, constituted high proportions of the cultivable microflora. In contrast, implants failing from suspected traumatic etiology demonstrated a morphotype profile consistent with periodontal health and cultivable microflora predominated by streptococci. When evaluating the time of failure after initial insertion, it was found that fixture loss resulting from infection occurred most often between initial placement and second-stage surgery, whereas failure in the absence of infection occurred primarily after insertion of the final prosthesis. The terms infectious and traumatic failure have been introduced to describe these 2 clinically and microbiologically distinct phenomena.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    ISSN: 1600-051X
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Bacterial specificity in human periodontal diseases suggests the possibility of diagnosing and treating periodontitis as specific infections and using microbiological diagnostic means to evaluate the efficacy of periodontal therapy. In a series of clinical trials, the usefulness of topical antimicrobial agents in combination with surgical and non-surgical conventional periodontal therapy were tested. The healing result was estimated by monitoring probing attachment levels (PAL). The usefulness of clinical and microbiological parameters to evaluate post-treatment healing result was tested. 9 of the patients exhibiting sites with recurrent periodontal disease were then evaluated for clinical and microbiological parameters to define accurate means to differentiate between active and inactive periodontal disease. The results showed that the frequency of periodontal lesions with significant loss of PAL after treatment was less in patients treated with antimicrobial agent. Specific microbiological parameters showed stronger correlation than clinical parameters with gain and/or loss of PAL post-treatment. Thus Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Bacteroides gingivalis occurred in periodontal lesions with progressing disease after treatment, but were rarely detected in samples from pockets of the same depths which did not exhibit further loss of PAL over a study period of 1 year. This study points to the usefulness of topical antimicrobial agent as an adjunct to mechanical subgingival debridement in the treatment of periodontitis in adults. The results also indicate the utility of diagnostic microbiology in the assessment of periodontal disease activity post-treatment.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...