Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Munksgaard International Publishers
    Indoor air 8 (1998), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1600-0668
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Small environmental chamber tests were conducted to characterize the emissions of a toxic chemical compound – methyl ethyl ketoxime (MEKO) – from three different alkyd paints. It was found that MEKO emissions occurred almost immediately after each alkyd paint was applied to a pine board. Due to the fast emission pattern, more than 90% of the MEKO emitted was released within 10 hours after painting. The peak concentrations of MEKO in chamber air correlated well with the MEKO content in the paint. Material balance showed that good recovery (more than 68%) was achieved between the MEKO applied with the paint and the MEKO emitted. The chamber data were simulated by a first order decay emission model assuming the MEKO emissions were mostly gas-phase mass transfer controlled. The model was used to predict indoor MEKO concentrations during and after painting in a test house. It was found that the predicted test house MEKO concentrations during and after the painting exceeded a suggested indoor exposure limit of 0.1 mg/m3 for all three paints. The predicted MEKO concentrations exceeded even the lower limit of a suggested sensory irritation range of 4 to 18 mg/m3 with two of the three paints tested. The model was also used to evaluate and demonstrate the effectiveness of risk reduction options including selection of lower MEKO paints and higher ventilation during painting.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Munksgaard International Publishers
    Indoor air 6 (1996), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1600-0668
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Sources of indoor air pollutants in residential and office environments can be managed to reduce occupant exposures. Techniques for managing indoor air pollution sources include: source elimination, substitution, modification, pretreatment, and altering the amount, location, or time of use. Intelligent source management requires knowledge of the source's emission characteristics, including chemical composition, emission rates, and decay rates. In addition, knowledge of mechanical and natural outdoor air exchange rates, heating/air-conditioning duct flow rates, and local exhaust fan (e.g., kitchen, bathroom) flow rates is needed to determine pollutant concentrations. Finally, indoor air quality (IAQ) models use this information and occupant activity patterns to determine instantaneous and/or cumulative individual exposure. This paper describes a number of residential and office scenarios for various indoor air pollution sources, several ventilation conditions, and typical occupant activity patterns. IAQ model predictions of occupant exposures for these scenarios are given for selected source management options. A one-month period was used to compare exposures; thus, long-term exposure information is not presented in this paper.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Munksgaard International Publishers
    Indoor air 1 (1991), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1600-0668
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Medicine
    Notes: The interaction of indoor air pollutants with interior surfaces (i.e., sinks) is a well known, but poorly understood, phenomenon. Studies have shown that re-emissions of adsorbed organic vapours can contribute to elevated concentrations of organics in indoor environments. Research is being conducted in small environmental test chambers to develop data for predicting sink behaviour. This paper reports on the development of sink models based on fundamental mass transfer theory. The results of experiments conducted to determine the magnitude and rate of adsorption and desorption of vapour phase organic compounds for several materials are presented. Five materials were evaluated: carpet, painted wallboard, ceiling tile, window glass, and upholstery. Two organic compounds were tested with each material: tetrachloroethylene (a common cleaning solvent) and ethylbenzene (a common constituent of petroleum-based solvents widely used in consumer products). The results of the experimental work are presented showing the relevant sink effect parameters for each material tested and comparing the sorptive behaviour of the two organic compounds evaluated. An indoor air quality (IAQ) model was modified to incorporate adsorption and desorption sink rates. The model was used to predict the temporal history of the concentration of total vapour phase organics in a test house after application of a wood finishing product. The predicted results are presented and compared to measured values. Suggestions for further research on indoor sinks are presented.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    ISSN: 1749-6632
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Munksgaard International Publishers
    Indoor air 3 (1993), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1600-0668
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Architecture, Civil Engineering, Surveying , Medicine
    Notes: Emissions from freshly applied paints and other coatings can cause elevated indoor concentrations of vapor-phase organics. Methods are needed to determine the emission rates over time for these products. Some success has been achieved using simple first-order decay models to evaluate data from small dynamic test chambers. While such empirical approaches may be useful for assessing the emission potmial of indoor sources, a more fundamental approach is needed to fully elucidate the relevant mass transfer processes. As a first step, a simple model based on boundary layer theory has been developed. In this model, the mass transfer rate is assumed to be controlled by the boundary layer mass transfer coefficient, the saturation vapor pressure of the material being emitted, and the mass of volatile material remaining in the source at any point in time. Static and dynamic chamber tests and test house experiments were conducted to obtain model validation data, Preliminary validaion results indicated that the model can be applied to different products with similar solvents. The model provides a better fit to chamber-derived emissions data than the empirical first-order decay model, especially over the decaying portion of the concentration vs. time curve
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    ISSN: 1520-5851
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Energy, Environment Protection, Nuclear Power Engineering
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...