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  • 1
    Call number: QZ202.6:31
    Keywords: Viral carcinogenesis ; Oncogenic Viruses ; Viral cell transformation ; Oncogenic Viruses ; Tumor Virus Infections
    Pages: xl, 244 p. : ill. (some col.)
    ISBN: 9783805585767
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    QZ202.6:31 available
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  • 2
    Keywords: Life sciences ; Life sciences ; Life Sciences, general ; Springer eBooks
    Abstract: Present-day society asks more from agriculture than just the production of food. Agriculture is now required to be concerned with the quality of food, ecosystem services, inclusion of marginalized populations, revitalization of rural territories, energy production, etc. This opening up of the future of agriculture encourages rural actors to experiment with new farming systems, using imagination, creativity and determination to replace dominant models. At the same time, low-cost mass-production systems continue on their way, with promises of a future based on green technologies. In this discussion it is important to consider what kind of sustainable development societies really want. Which innovations will help in achieving these developments? What role can research and public policies play in supporting the emergence of these innovations? This book takes the debate beyond the purely technical options and considers social and institutional innovations as well. It demonstrates that innovation is the result of a confrontation between visions of actors who often have divergent interests. There is no single path towards sustainable development and we must find ways to encourage the emergence and co-existence of different types of agriculture and food systems. The success of transitions will not only depend on our capacity to rethink existing models, but especially on our willingness to embark on a creative learning process from which we will inevitably emerge transformed
    Pages: : digital.
    ISBN: 9789086867684
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  • 3
    Unknown
    Basel : Karger
    Call number: 01-Krebspraev:9
    Keywords: Tobacco habit / Treatment ; Tobacco smoke / Health aspects ; Smoking / Prevention ; Smoking cessation programs ; Smoking / adverse effects ; Smoking / prevention & control ; Tobacco Use Disorder ; Tobacco Smoke Pollution ; Smoking Cessation / methods
    Pages: x, 265 p. : ill.
    ISBN: 3805565313
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    01-Krebspraev:9 departmental collection or stack – please contact the library
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  • 4
    Unknown
    New York : Springer
    Call number: WN200:42
    Keywords: Brain / Magnetic resonance imaging ; Magnetic Resonance Imaging ; Brain / diagnosis
    Pages: xii, 575 p. : ill.
    ISBN: 3540642633
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    WN200:42 available
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Food Chemistry 24 (1987), S. 187-196 
    ISSN: 0308-8146
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1432-1041
    Keywords: morphine ; cancer ; morphine-6-glucuronide ; renal function ; drug metabolism ; pharmacokinetics
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine
    Notes: Summary There is growing evidence that renally-impaired patients receiving morphine therapy are at greater risk of developing opiate toxicity, due to the accumulation of an active metabolite, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G), which is usually excreted by the kidneys. This study examined the relationships between morphine dosage, renal function, and trough plasma concentrations of morphine and its glucuronide metabolites in 21 patients (aged mean: 68.5 years; 11 males) receiving either oral or subcutaneous morphine for terminal cancer pain. The median daily morphine dosages (mg · kg−1) were: orally 1.87 (range 0.37–6.82) and subcutaneously 1.64 (range 0.22–3.60). The median plasma concentrations of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G), and M6G (ng · ml−1) were: 36.0, 1035.2, and 142.3, respectively. The plasma concentrations of morphine, M3G and M6G were each significantly related to the daily morphine dosage (n=21, Spearman r=0.79, 0.91, and 0.88 respectively). Accumulation of the morphine glucuronides was dependent on renal function. The plasma concentrations of M3G and M6G, when divided by the morphine concentration, were significantly related to the caluclated creatinine clearance of the patient. Patients receiving oral morphine had higher plasma concentration ratios of glucuronide/morphine than those receiving subcutaneous therapy, presumably due to first-pass glucuronidation. The results of this study confirm that accumulation of the pharmacologically active M6G is related to renal function, which probably explains the observation that morphine dosage requirements are generally reduced in patients with renal impairment.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1432-1106
    Keywords: Cerebro-cerebellar ; Interpositus ; Monkey
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary The patterns of convergence of cerebral and peripheral nerve inputs onto interpositus neurons were studied in cebus monkeys. The strongest inputs to interpositus neurons are from motor and somatosensory cortex, with weaker inputs from peripheral nerves and cerebral area 6. The neurons in the anterior portion of interpositus receive cerebral and peripheral inputs primarily representing the hindlimb, while inputs to neurons in the posterior division represent forelimb or mixed forelimb and hindlimb. The hindlimb neurons integrate signals principally from motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, nerves, supplementary motor and medial premotor areas, while forelimb neurons receive inputs from motor, somatosensory, lateral premotor cortical areas and nerves. The results from this study are compared with those from studies of interpositus and dentate neurons in cat and monkey in order to determine the role of n. interpositus in movement. It is suggested that the inputs integrated by interpositus neurons are consistent with a role in up-dating skilled movements.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1432-1106
    Keywords: Middle and lateral suprasylvian cortex ; Visual association cortex ; Directional selectivity
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary The visual response properties of cells in the middle (MS) and lateral (LS) suprasylvian cortices were studied in alert cats, which were trained to fixate a spot of light and maintain fixation when a second test light was introduced in the midst of fixation. This second light served to test for visual sensitivity, and it could be moved at different speeds in any direction under computer control. Over half of the cells exhibited a visual response. With a small spot of light, most cells were directionally selective and responded better to a moving spot than to a stationary one. In some cases movements of the spot in the non-preferred direction revealed an inhibitory process. The visual receptive fields were large and often extended into the ipsilateral hemifield, though the centers of the receptive fields were usually in the contralateral field. We used Fourier analysis to quantify directional selectivity and compared these results to other commonly used measures of directional selectivity. Compared to cells in MS, there was a higher incidence of visual cells in LS and the visual cells were more directional. We also made comparisons between our results and those found in anesthetized cats and awake monkeys.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1432-1106
    Keywords: Middle and lateral suprasylvian cortex ; Visual association cortex ; Visuomotor interactions ; Saccades ; Fixation ; Behaving cats
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary We studied visuomotor processing in the middle (MS) and lateral suprasylvian (LS) cortices of the alert cat by making single cell recordings while the cat was working in a behavioral task requiring visual fixation and visually guided eye movements. We found responses with three different components: visual sensory, saccaderelated motor, and fixation. Some cells exhibited purely visual responses and all of their activity during visuomotor tasks could be attributed to the sensory aspects of the task. Other cells showed no sensory response properties, but discharged in relation to the saccadic eye movements that the cat made to visual targets. A smaller number of fixation cells displayed increased discharge when the cat fixated a target light and usually only when that target was in a particular region of the visual field. These response components could be present in a variety of combinations in different cells, of which the largest proportion combined visuomotor responses and could take five general forms: simple visuomotor, saccadic enhanced, visually triggered movement (VTM), enhanced VTM, and disenhanced. Simple visuomotor responses had both a visual and saccade-related component. Saccadic enhanced responses had a visual response to the appearance of a spot in the cell's receptive field that became enhanced when the cat subsequently made a saccade to that spot. The VTM responses were synchronized better to the visual stimulus than to the saccade, but they also exhibited properties expected of motor responses. The last two classes of visuomotor responses were rare: one we termed enhanced VTM and the other disenhanced. Cells could combine different visuomotor response components or even sensory, saccade-related and fixation responses in different combinations for different directions of eye movements. Generally, the timing of the saccade-related responses occurred too late to play a role in the initiation of saccades: most (83%) saccade-related responses occurred between 40 ms before to 80 ms after the onset of the eye movement. Cells of all different types could be found in both the MS and LS areas, though in general the responses in LS were more sensory in nature while those in MS were more closely related to the eye movement. About a quarter of the cells were unresponsive during any aspect of our tasks.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1432-1106
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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