Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-02-10
    Description: M cells are located in the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) that covers Peyer’s patches (PPs) and are responsible for the uptake of intestinal antigens. The differentiation of M cells is initiated by receptor activator of NF-B. However, the intracellular pathways involved in M cell differentiation are still elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that the NF-B pathway activated by RANK is essential for M cell differentiation using in vitro organoid culture. Overexpression of NF-B transcription factors enhances the expression of M cell–associated molecules but is not sufficient to complete M cell differentiation. Furthermore, we evaluated the requirement for tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6 (TRAF6). Conditional deletion of TRAF6 in the intestinal epithelium causes a complete loss of M cells in PPs, resulting in impaired antigen uptake into PPs. In addition, the expression of FAE-associated genes is almost silenced in TRAF6-deficient mice. This study thus demonstrates the crucial role of TRAF6-mediated NF-B signaling in the development of M cells and FAE.
    Keywords: Infectious Disease and Host Defense, Mucosal Immunology
    Print ISSN: 0022-1007
    Electronic ISSN: 1540-9538
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 0375-9474
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-05-31
    Description: Female mosquitoes of some species are generalists and will blood-feed on a variety of vertebrate hosts, whereas others display marked host preference. Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti have evolved a strong preference for humans, making them dangerously efficient vectors of malaria and Dengue haemorrhagic fever. Specific host odours probably drive this strong preference because other attractive cues, including body heat and exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2), are common to all warm-blooded hosts. Insects sense odours via several chemosensory receptor families, including the odorant receptors (ORs), membrane proteins that form heteromeric odour-gated ion channels comprising a variable ligand-selective subunit and an obligate co-receptor called Orco (ref. 6). Here we use zinc-finger nucleases to generate targeted mutations in the orco gene of A. aegypti to examine the contribution of Orco and the odorant receptor pathway to mosquito host selection and sensitivity to the insect repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide). orco mutant olfactory sensory neurons have greatly reduced spontaneous activity and lack odour-evoked responses. Behaviourally, orco mutant mosquitoes have severely reduced attraction to honey, an odour cue related to floral nectar, and do not respond to human scent in the absence of CO2. However, in the presence of CO2, female orco mutant mosquitoes retain strong attraction to both human and animal hosts, but no longer strongly prefer humans. orco mutant females are attracted to human hosts even in the presence of DEET, but are repelled upon contact, indicating that olfactory- and contact-mediated effects of DEET are mechanistically distinct. We conclude that the odorant receptor pathway is crucial for an anthropophilic vector mosquito to discriminate human from non-human hosts and to be effectively repelled by volatile DEET.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3696029/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3696029/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉DeGennaro, Matthew -- McBride, Carolyn S -- Seeholzer, Laura -- Nakagawa, Takao -- Dennis, Emily J -- Goldman, Chloe -- Jasinskiene, Nijole -- James, Anthony A -- Vosshall, Leslie B -- AI29746/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- DC012069/DC/NIDCD NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI029746/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI029746/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jun 27;498(7455):487-91. doi: 10.1038/nature12206. Epub 2013 May 29.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10065, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23719379" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aedes/drug effects/*genetics/*physiology ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Base Sequence ; DEET/administration & dosage/*pharmacology ; Drug Resistance/drug effects ; Female ; Genes, Insect/*genetics ; Honey ; Host Specificity/drug effects/*genetics ; Humans ; Insect Repellents/administration & dosage/*pharmacology ; Male ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutagenesis, Site-Directed ; Mutation/*genetics ; Neurons/cytology/drug effects ; Odors/analysis ; Olfactory Pathways/cytology/drug effects ; Volatilization
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2011-04-02
    Description: SHARPIN is a ubiquitin-binding and ubiquitin-like-domain-containing protein which, when mutated in mice, results in immune system disorders and multi-organ inflammation. Here we report that SHARPIN functions as a novel component of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) and that the absence of SHARPIN causes dysregulation of NF-kappaB and apoptotic signalling pathways, explaining the severe phenotypes displayed by chronic proliferative dermatitis (cpdm) in SHARPIN-deficient mice. Upon binding to the LUBAC subunit HOIP (also known as RNF31), SHARPIN stimulates the formation of linear ubiquitin chains in vitro and in vivo. Coexpression of SHARPIN and HOIP promotes linear ubiquitination of NEMO (also known as IKBKG), an adaptor of the IkappaB kinases (IKKs) and subsequent activation of NF-kappaB signalling, whereas SHARPIN deficiency in mice causes an impaired activation of the IKK complex and NF-kappaB in B cells, macrophages and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). This effect is further enhanced upon concurrent downregulation of HOIL-1L (also known as RBCK1), another HOIP-binding component of LUBAC. In addition, SHARPIN deficiency leads to rapid cell death upon tumour-necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) stimulation via FADD- and caspase-8-dependent pathways. SHARPIN thus activates NF-kappaB and inhibits apoptosis via distinct pathways in vivo.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3085511/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3085511/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ikeda, Fumiyo -- Deribe, Yonathan Lissanu -- Skanland, Sigrid S -- Stieglitz, Benjamin -- Grabbe, Caroline -- Franz-Wachtel, Mirita -- van Wijk, Sjoerd J L -- Goswami, Panchali -- Nagy, Vanja -- Terzic, Janos -- Tokunaga, Fuminori -- Androulidaki, Ariadne -- Nakagawa, Tomoko -- Pasparakis, Manolis -- Iwai, Kazuhiro -- Sundberg, John P -- Schaefer, Liliana -- Rittinger, Katrin -- Macek, Boris -- Dikic, Ivan -- AR049288/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- MC_U117565398/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- R01 AR049288/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR049288-07/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Mar 31;471(7340):637-41. doi: 10.1038/nature09814.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Frankfurt Institute for Molecular Life Sciences and Institute of Biochemistry II, Goethe University School of Medicine, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, D-60590 Frankfurt, Main, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21455181" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; *Apoptosis/drug effects ; B-Lymphocytes/metabolism ; Carrier Proteins/metabolism ; Caspase 8/metabolism ; Cells, Cultured ; Dermatitis/genetics/metabolism/pathology ; Fas-Associated Death Domain Protein/metabolism ; Fibroblasts/metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; I-kappa B Kinase/metabolism ; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism ; Macrophages/metabolism ; Mice ; NF-kappa B/*metabolism ; Nerve Tissue Proteins/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism/pharmacology ; Ubiquitin/*metabolism ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes/*metabolism ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/metabolism ; Ubiquitination
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-04-02
    Description: Cpdm (chronic proliferative dermatitis) mice develop chronic dermatitis and an immunodeficiency with increased serum IgM, symptoms that resemble those of patients with X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome and hypohydrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XHM-ED), which is caused by mutations in NEMO (NF-kappaB essential modulator; also known as IKBKG). Spontaneous null mutations in the Sharpin (SHANK-associated RH domain interacting protein in postsynaptic density) gene are responsible for the cpdm phenotype in mice. SHARPIN shows significant similarity to HOIL-1L (also known as RBCK1), a component of linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC), which induces NF-kappaB activation through conjugation of linear polyubiquitin chains to NEMO. Here, we identify SHARPIN as an additional component of LUBAC. SHARPIN-containing complexes can linearly ubiquitinate NEMO and activated NF-kappaB. Thus, we re-define LUBAC as a complex containing SHARPIN, HOIL-1L, and HOIP (also known as RNF31). Deletion of SHARPIN drastically reduced the amount of LUBAC, which resulted in attenuated TNF-alpha- and CD40-mediated activation of NF-kappaB in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) or B cells from cpdm mice. Considering the pleomorphic phenotype of cpdm mice, these results confirm the predicted role of LUBAC-mediated linear polyubiquitination in NF-kappaB activation induced by various stimuli, and strongly suggest the involvement of LUBAC-induced NF-kappaB activation in various disorders.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tokunaga, Fuminori -- Nakagawa, Tomoko -- Nakahara, Masaki -- Saeki, Yasushi -- Taniguchi, Masami -- Sakata, Shin-ichi -- Tanaka, Keiji -- Nakano, Hiroyasu -- Iwai, Kazuhiro -- England -- Nature. 2011 Mar 31;471(7340):633-6. doi: 10.1038/nature09815.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biophysics and Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21455180" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; CD40 Ligand/metabolism ; Carrier Proteins/metabolism ; Cells, Cultured ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism ; Mice ; Multiprotein Complexes/*chemistry/*metabolism ; NF-kappa B/*metabolism ; Nerve Tissue Proteins/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism ; Ubiquitin/*metabolism ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligase Complexes/chemistry/metabolism ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-02-15
    Description: Liposomes consisting of 100% phosphatidylcholine exhibit poor membrane fusion, cellular uptake and selective targeting capacities. To overcome these limitations, we used Amadori-glycated phosphatidylethanolamine, which is universally present in animals and commonly consumed in foods. We found that liposomes containing Amadori-glycated phosphatidylethanolamine exhibited significantly reduced negative membrane potential and demonstrated high cellular uptake.
    Keywords: biochemistry, biomedical engineering
    Electronic ISSN: 2054-5703
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Published by Royal Society
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2011-03-19
    Description: Ammonia borane (H(3)N-BH(3), AB) is a lightweight material containing a high density of hydrogen (H(2)) that can be readily liberated for use in fuel cell-powered applications. However, in the absence of a straightforward, efficient method for regenerating AB from dehydrogenated polymeric spent fuel, its full potential as a viable H(2) storage material will not be realized. We demonstrate that the spent fuel type derived from the removal of greater than two equivalents of H(2) per molecule of AB (i.e., polyborazylene, PB) can be converted back to AB nearly quantitatively by 24-hour treatment with hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) in liquid ammonia (NH(3)) at 40 degrees C in a sealed pressure vessel.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Sutton, Andrew D -- Burrell, Anthony K -- Dixon, David A -- Garner, Edward B 3rd -- Gordon, John C -- Nakagawa, Tessui -- Ott, Kevin C -- Robinson, J Pierce -- Vasiliu, Monica -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Mar 18;331(6023):1426-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1199003.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA. adsutton@lanl.gov〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21415349" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2012-10-23
    Description: Radiocarbon ((14)C) provides a way to date material that contains carbon with an age up to ~50,000 years and is also an important tracer of the global carbon cycle. However, the lack of a comprehensive record reflecting atmospheric (14)C prior to 12.5 thousand years before the present (kyr B.P.) has limited the application of radiocarbon dating of samples from the Last Glacial period. Here, we report (14)C results from Lake Suigetsu, Japan (35 degrees 35'N, 135 degrees 53'E), which provide a comprehensive record of terrestrial radiocarbon to the present limit of the (14)C method. The time scale we present in this work allows direct comparison of Lake Suigetsu paleoclimatic data with other terrestrial climatic records and gives information on the connection between global atmospheric and regional marine radiocarbon levels.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Bronk Ramsey, Christopher -- Staff, Richard A -- Bryant, Charlotte L -- Brock, Fiona -- Kitagawa, Hiroyuki -- van der Plicht, Johannes -- Schlolaut, Gordon -- Marshall, Michael H -- Brauer, Achim -- Lamb, Henry F -- Payne, Rebecca L -- Tarasov, Pavel E -- Haraguchi, Tsuyoshi -- Gotanda, Katsuya -- Yonenobu, Hitoshi -- Yokoyama, Yusuke -- Tada, Ryuji -- Nakagawa, Takeshi -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Oct 19;338(6105):370-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1226660.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. christopher.ramsey@rlaha.ox.ac.uk〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23087245" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Atmosphere/*chemistry ; Calibration ; Carbon Radioisotopes/analysis ; Fossils ; Geologic Sediments/*chemistry ; Lakes/*chemistry ; Radiometric Dating/*standards ; Trees/anatomy & histology/growth & development
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  87. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie; 20160504-20160507; Düsseldorf; DOC16hnod635 /20160330/
    Publication Date: 2016-03-31
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  GMS Current Posters in Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery; VOL: 12; DOC038 /20160411/
    Publication Date: 2016-04-12
    Description: Introduction: Induced pluripotent stem cells allow us to confirm the results from animal experiments on human cells in a safe and convenient way. This give us the opportunity to investigate their role in the field of regenerative medicine for inner ear diseases.Methods: The effect of BDNF, NT-3 and IGF-1 on neurite outgrowth of human induced pluripotent stem (hiPS) cell-derived neurons was examined. First, human iPS cell line 201B7-GFP was differentiated into neural progenitor cells. Neurospheres were prepared from neural progenitor cells by floating culture on U-bottom low adhesion plate. After that the neurospheres were transferred on Matrigel-coated plates and underwent neuronal differentiation for 7 days with or without additional neurotrophic or growth factors. Results: Immunocytochemistry showed betaIII-tubulin and neurofilament positive cells in the neurospheres. The neurites of each neurosphere were counted. No significant difference was observed between the different groups. Conclusions: Previous studies demonstrate the effect of BDNF, NT-3 and IGF-1 on neurite outgrowth. In our study for the first time this assessment is done by using human iPS cells. Our results differ from the results previously reported. This could be due to the genetic instability of iPS cells.Der Erstautor gibt keinen Interessenkonflikt an.
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: article
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...