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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-06-16
    Description: Seagrasses evolved from terrestrial plants into marine foundation species around 100 million years ago. Their ecological success, however, remains a mystery because natural organic matter accumulation within the beds should result in toxic sediment sulfide levels. Using a meta-analysis, a field study, and a laboratory experiment, we reveal how an ancient three-stage symbiosis between seagrass, lucinid bivalves, and their sulfide-oxidizing gill bacteria reduces sulfide stress for seagrasses. We found that the bivalve-sulfide-oxidizer symbiosis reduced sulfide levels and enhanced seagrass production as measured in biomass. In turn, the bivalves and their endosymbionts profit from organic matter accumulation and radial oxygen release from the seagrass roots. These findings elucidate the long-term success of seagrasses in warm waters and offer new prospects for seagrass ecosystem conservation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉van der Heide, Tjisse -- Govers, Laura L -- de Fouw, Jimmy -- Olff, Han -- van der Geest, Matthijs -- van Katwijk, Marieke M -- Piersma, Theunis -- van de Koppel, Johan -- Silliman, Brian R -- Smolders, Alfons J P -- van Gils, Jan A -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jun 15;336(6087):1432-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1219973.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Community and Conservation Ecology Group, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies, University of Groningen, Post Office Box 11103, 9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. t.van.der.heide@rug.nl〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22700927" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Angiosperms/growth & development/*physiology ; Animals ; Bacteria/growth & development/*metabolism ; Biomass ; Bivalvia/metabolism/microbiology/*physiology ; Chemoautotrophic Growth ; *Ecosystem ; Geologic Sediments/chemistry ; Gills/microbiology ; Oxidation-Reduction ; Oxygen/metabolism ; Plant Roots/metabolism ; *Seawater/chemistry ; Sulfides/analysis/metabolism ; *Symbiosis ; Zosteraceae/growth & development/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-11-22
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ma, Zhijun -- Melville, David S -- Liu, Jianguo -- Chen, Ying -- Yang, Hongyan -- Ren, Wenwei -- Zhang, Zhengwang -- Piersma, Theunis -- Li, Bo -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Nov 21;346(6212):912-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1257258.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, Institute of Biodiversity Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200438, China. No. 1261 Dovedale Road, Rural Delivery 2, Wakefield, Nelson, 7096, New Zealand. Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823, USA. College of Nature Reserve, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China. Chair in Global Flyway Ecology, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies, University of Groningen, Post Office Box 11103, 9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. Department of Marine Ecology, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Post Office Box 59, 1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. World Wildlife Fund China Shanghai Office, No. 121 Zhongshan North Road, Shanghai 200083, China. Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China. zhijunm@fudan.edu.cn. ; No. 1261 Dovedale Road, Rural Delivery 2, Wakefield, Nelson, 7096, New Zealand. ; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823, USA. ; Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, Institute of Biodiversity Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200438, China. ; College of Nature Reserve, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China. Chair in Global Flyway Ecology, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies, University of Groningen, Post Office Box 11103, 9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. Department of Marine Ecology, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Post Office Box 59, 1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. ; World Wildlife Fund China Shanghai Office, No. 121 Zhongshan North Road, Shanghai 200083, China. ; Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China. ; Chair in Global Flyway Ecology, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Studies, University of Groningen, Post Office Box 11103, 9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. Department of Marine Ecology, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Post Office Box 59, 1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25414287" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animal Migration ; Animals ; *Biodiversity ; Birds ; China ; *Conservation of Natural Resources ; *Wetlands
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-05-14
    Description: Reductions in body size are increasingly being identified as a response to climate warming. Here we present evidence for a case of such body shrinkage, potentially due to malnutrition in early life. We show that an avian long-distance migrant (red knot, Calidris canutus canutus), which is experiencing globally unrivaled warming rates at its high-Arctic breeding grounds, produces smaller offspring with shorter bills during summers with early snowmelt. This has consequences half a world away at their tropical wintering grounds, where shorter-billed individuals have reduced survival rates. This is associated with these molluscivores eating fewer deeply buried bivalve prey and more shallowly buried seagrass rhizomes. We suggest that seasonal migrants can experience reduced fitness at one end of their range as a result of a changing climate at the other end.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉van Gils, Jan A -- Lisovski, Simeon -- Lok, Tamar -- Meissner, Wlodzimierz -- Ozarowska, Agnieszka -- de Fouw, Jimmy -- Rakhimberdiev, Eldar -- Soloviev, Mikhail Y -- Piersma, Theunis -- Klaassen, Marcel -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 May 13;352(6287):819-21. doi: 10.1126/science.aad6351.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Coastal Systems, NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, and Utrecht University, Post Office Box 59, 1790 AB Den Burg (Texel), Netherlands. ; Centre for Integrative Ecology, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds Campus, Victoria 3217, Australia. ; Conservation Ecology Group, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences (GELIFES), University of Groningen, Post Office Box 11103, 9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive, Unite Mixte de Recherche 5175, Campus Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 1919 Route de Mende, 34293 Montpellier Cedex 5, France. ; Avian Ecophysiology Unit, Department of Vertebrate Ecology and Zoology, University of Gdansk, Wita Stwosza 59, 80-308 Gdansk, Poland. ; Department of Coastal Systems, NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, and Utrecht University, Post Office Box 59, 1790 AB Den Burg (Texel), Netherlands. Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991, Russia. ; Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991, Russia. ; Department of Coastal Systems, NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, and Utrecht University, Post Office Box 59, 1790 AB Den Burg (Texel), Netherlands. Conservation Ecology Group, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences (GELIFES), University of Groningen, Post Office Box 11103, 9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27174985" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1432-136X
    Keywords: Basal metabolic rate ; Thermal conductance ; Physiological adaptations ; Annual rhythms ; Bird migration
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Knots Calidris canutus live highly seasonal lives, breeding solitarily on high arctic tundra and spending the non-breeding season in large social flocks in temperate to tropical estuaries. Their reproductive activities and physiological preparations for long flights are reflected in pronounced plumage and body mass changes, even in long-term captives of the islandica subspecies (breeding in north Greenland and northeast Canada and wintering in western Europe) studied in outdoor aviaries. The three to four fattening episodes in April-July in connection with the flights to and from the high arctic breeding grounds by free-living birds, are represented by a single period of high body mass, peaking between late May and early July in a sample of ten captive islandica knots studied over four years. There are consistent and synchronized annual variations in basal metabolic rate and thermal conductance in three islandica knots. Basal metabolic rate was highest during the summer body mass peak. Within the examined individuals, basal metabolic rate scales on body mass with an exponent of about 1.4, probably reflecting a general hypertrophy of metabolically expensive muscles and organs. Any potential effect of moult on basal metabolic rate was obscured by the large seasonal mass-associated variations. In breeding plumage, insulation (the inverse of thermal conductance) was a factor of 1.35 lower than in winter plumage. This was paralleled by the dry mass of contour feathers being a factor of 1.17 lower. In this subspecies the breeding season is indeed the period during which the costs of thermoregulation are lowest. In captive knots seasonal changes in basal metabolic rate and thermal conductance likely reflect an anticipatory programme adaptive to the variable demands made by the environment at different times of the year.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Netherlands Journal of Sea Research 31 (1993), S. 301-302 
    ISSN: 0077-7579
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    ISSN: 0077-7579
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    ISSN: 0077-7579
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 0077-7579
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1432-1939
    Keywords: Diel rhythms ; Vertical distribution of pelagic fish ; Prey availability ; Foraging ; Fish-eating birds
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Summary Great crested grebes Podiceps cristatus only foraged for an hour or two during dawn and again during dusk on Lake IJsselmeer in August-September. During this time of the year the adult birds are in wing moult and temporarily unable to fly. The food of grebes consisted almost exclusively of smelt Osmerus eperlanus, the most numberous pelagic fish. Simultaneous sonar registrations and trawl net fishing showed that smelt moved to the water surface during the twilight periods. During day and night they were concentrated near the bottom. We argue that grebes have the best foraging opportunities during twilight when much of their prey is near the surface, where light intensities allow the fish to be detected and captured. When the smelt are in the upper water layers the distance to the covered to get the prey (i.e. diving time and cost) is also least.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Animal Behaviour 36 (1988), S. 773-779 
    ISSN: 0003-3472
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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