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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-12-14
    Description: Observational work conducted over the past few decades indicates that all massive galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centres. Although the luminosities and brightness fluctuations of quasars in the early Universe suggest that some were powered by black holes with masses greater than 10 billion solar masses, the remnants of these objects have not been found in the nearby Universe. The giant elliptical galaxy Messier 87 hosts the hitherto most massive known black hole, which has a mass of 6.3 billion solar masses. Here we report that NGC 3842, the brightest galaxy in a cluster at a distance from Earth of 98 megaparsecs, has a central black hole with a mass of 9.7 billion solar masses, and that a black hole of comparable or greater mass is present in NGC 4889, the brightest galaxy in the Coma cluster (at a distance of 103 megaparsecs). These two black holes are significantly more massive than predicted by linearly extrapolating the widely used correlations between black-hole mass and the stellar velocity dispersion or bulge luminosity of the host galaxy. Although these correlations remain useful for predicting black-hole masses in less massive elliptical galaxies, our measurements suggest that different evolutionary processes influence the growth of the largest galaxies and their black holes.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉McConnell, Nicholas J -- Ma, Chung-Pei -- Gebhardt, Karl -- Wright, Shelley A -- Murphy, Jeremy D -- Lauer, Tod R -- Graham, James R -- Richstone, Douglas O -- England -- Nature. 2011 Dec 8;480(7376):215-8. doi: 10.1038/nature10636.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22158244" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-09-22
    Description: Re-ionization of the intergalactic medium occurred in the early Universe at redshift z approximately 6-11, following the formation of the first generation of stars. Those young galaxies (where the bulk of stars formed) at a cosmic age of less than about 500 million years (z less, similar 10) remain largely unexplored because they are at or beyond the sensitivity limits of existing large telescopes. Understanding the properties of these galaxies is critical to identifying the source of the radiation that re-ionized the intergalactic medium. Gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters allows the detection of high-redshift galaxies fainter than what otherwise could be found in the deepest images of the sky. Here we report multiband observations of the cluster MACS J1149+2223 that have revealed (with high probability) a gravitationally magnified galaxy from the early Universe, at a redshift of z = 9.6 +/- 0.2 (that is, a cosmic age of 490 +/- 15 million years, or 3.6 per cent of the age of the Universe). We estimate that it formed less than 200 million years after the Big Bang (at the 95 per cent confidence level), implying a formation redshift of less, similar14. Given the small sky area that our observations cover, faint galaxies seem to be abundant at such a young cosmic age, suggesting that they may be the dominant source for the early re-ionization of the intergalactic medium.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zheng, Wei -- Postman, Marc -- Zitrin, Adi -- Moustakas, John -- Shu, Xinwen -- Jouvel, Stephanie -- Host, Ole -- Molino, Alberto -- Bradley, Larry -- Coe, Dan -- Moustakas, Leonidas A -- Carrasco, Mauricio -- Ford, Holland -- Benitez, Narciso -- Lauer, Tod R -- Seitz, Stella -- Bouwens, Rychard -- Koekemoer, Anton -- Medezinski, Elinor -- Bartelmann, Matthias -- Broadhurst, Tom -- Donahue, Megan -- Grillo, Claudio -- Infante, Leopoldo -- Jha, Saurabh W -- Kelson, Daniel D -- Lahav, Ofer -- Lemze, Doron -- Melchior, Peter -- Meneghetti, Massimo -- Merten, Julian -- Nonino, Mario -- Ogaz, Sara -- Rosati, Piero -- Umetsu, Keiichi -- van der Wel, Arjen -- England -- Nature. 2012 Sep 20;489(7416):406-8. doi: 10.1038/nature11446.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA. zheng@pha.jhu.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22996554" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-10-17
    Description: The Pluto system was recently explored by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, making closest approach on 14 July 2015. Pluto's surface displays diverse landforms, terrain ages, albedos, colors, and composition gradients. Evidence is found for a water-ice crust, geologically young surface units, surface ice convection, wind streaks, volatile transport, and glacial flow. Pluto's atmosphere is highly extended, with trace hydrocarbons, a global haze layer, and a surface pressure near 10 microbars. Pluto's diverse surface geology and long-term activity raise fundamental questions about how small planets remain active many billions of years after formation. Pluto's large moon Charon displays tectonics and evidence for a heterogeneous crustal composition; its north pole displays puzzling dark terrain. Small satellites Hydra and Nix have higher albedos than expected.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Stern, S A -- Bagenal, F -- Ennico, K -- Gladstone, G R -- Grundy, W M -- McKinnon, W B -- Moore, J M -- Olkin, C B -- Spencer, J R -- Weaver, H A -- Young, L A -- Andert, T -- Andrews, J -- Banks, M -- Bauer, B -- Bauman, J -- Barnouin, O S -- Bedini, P -- Beisser, K -- Beyer, R A -- Bhaskaran, S -- Binzel, R P -- Birath, E -- Bird, M -- Bogan, D J -- Bowman, A -- Bray, V J -- Brozovic, M -- Bryan, C -- Buckley, M R -- Buie, M W -- Buratti, B J -- Bushman, S S -- Calloway, A -- Carcich, B -- Cheng, A F -- Conard, S -- Conrad, C A -- Cook, J C -- Cruikshank, D P -- Custodio, O S -- Dalle Ore, C M -- Deboy, C -- Dischner, Z J B -- Dumont, P -- Earle, A M -- Elliott, H A -- Ercol, J -- Ernst, C M -- Finley, T -- Flanigan, S H -- Fountain, G -- Freeze, M J -- Greathouse, T -- Green, J L -- Guo, Y -- Hahn, M -- Hamilton, D P -- Hamilton, S A -- Hanley, J -- Harch, A -- Hart, H M -- Hersman, C B -- Hill, A -- Hill, M E -- Hinson, D P -- Holdridge, M E -- Horanyi, M -- Howard, A D -- Howett, C J A -- Jackman, C -- Jacobson, R A -- Jennings, D E -- Kammer, J A -- Kang, H K -- Kaufmann, D E -- Kollmann, P -- Krimigis, S M -- Kusnierkiewicz, D -- Lauer, T R -- Lee, J E -- Lindstrom, K L -- Linscott, I R -- Lisse, C M -- Lunsford, A W -- Mallder, V A -- Martin, N -- McComas, D J -- McNutt, R L Jr -- Mehoke, D -- Mehoke, T -- Melin, E D -- Mutchler, M -- Nelson, D -- Nimmo, F -- Nunez, J I -- Ocampo, A -- Owen, W M -- Paetzold, M -- Page, B -- Parker, A H -- Parker, J W -- Pelletier, F -- Peterson, J -- Pinkine, N -- Piquette, M -- Porter, S B -- Protopapa, S -- Redfern, J -- Reitsema, H J -- Reuter, D C -- Roberts, J H -- Robbins, S J -- Rogers, G -- Rose, D -- Runyon, K -- Retherford, K D -- Ryschkewitsch, M G -- Schenk, P -- Schindhelm, E -- Sepan, B -- Showalter, M R -- Singer, K N -- Soluri, M -- Stanbridge, D -- Steffl, A J -- Strobel, D F -- Stryk, T -- Summers, M E -- Szalay, J R -- Tapley, M -- Taylor, A -- Taylor, H -- Throop, H B -- Tsang, C C C -- Tyler, G L -- Umurhan, O M -- Verbiscer, A J -- Versteeg, M H -- Vincent, M -- Webbert, R -- Weidner, S -- Weigle, G E 2nd -- White, O L -- Whittenburg, K -- Williams, B G -- Williams, K -- Williams, S -- Woods, W W -- Zangari, A M -- Zirnstein, E -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Oct 16;350(6258):aad1815. doi: 10.1126/science.aad1815.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302, USA. astern@boulder.swri.edu. ; Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303, USA. ; National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center, Space Science Division, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA. ; Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 28510, USA. ; Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001, USA. ; Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA. ; Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302, USA. ; Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723, USA. ; Universitat der Bundeswehr Munchen, Neubiberg 85577, Germany. ; Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ 85719, USA. ; KinetX Aerospace, Tempe, AZ 85284, USA. ; NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, La Canada Flintridge, CA 91011, USA. ; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. ; University of Bonn, Bonn D-53113, Germany. ; NASA Headquarters (retired), Washington, DC 20546, USA. ; University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA. ; Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. ; NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC 20546, USA. ; Rheinisches Institut fur Umweltforschung an der Universitat zu Koln, Cologne 50931, Germany. ; Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA. ; Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA. ; Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA. ; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA. ; National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 26732, USA. ; NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812, USA. ; Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA. ; University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. ; Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX 77058, USA. ; Michael Soluri Photography, New York, NY 10014, USA. ; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA. ; Roane State Community College, Jamestown, TN 38556, USA. ; George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA. ; Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26472913" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-03-19
    Description: NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has revealed the complex geology of Pluto and Charon. Pluto's encounter hemisphere shows ongoing surface geological activity centered on a vast basin containing a thick layer of volatile ices that appears to be involved in convection and advection, with a crater retention age no greater than ~10 million years. Surrounding terrains show active glacial flow, apparent transport and rotation of large buoyant water-ice crustal blocks, and pitting, the latter likely caused by sublimation erosion and/or collapse. More enigmatic features include tall mounds with central depressions that are conceivably cryovolcanic and ridges with complex bladed textures. Pluto also has ancient cratered terrains up to ~4 billion years old that are extensionally faulted and extensively mantled and perhaps eroded by glacial or other processes. Charon does not appear to be currently active, but experienced major extensional tectonism and resurfacing (probably cryovolcanic) nearly 4 billion years ago. Impact crater populations on Pluto and Charon are not consistent with the steepest impactor size-frequency distributions proposed for the Kuiper belt.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Moore, Jeffrey M -- McKinnon, William B -- Spencer, John R -- Howard, Alan D -- Schenk, Paul M -- Beyer, Ross A -- Nimmo, Francis -- Singer, Kelsi N -- Umurhan, Orkan M -- White, Oliver L -- Stern, S Alan -- Ennico, Kimberly -- Olkin, Cathy B -- Weaver, Harold A -- Young, Leslie A -- Binzel, Richard P -- Buie, Marc W -- Buratti, Bonnie J -- Cheng, Andrew F -- Cruikshank, Dale P -- Grundy, Will M -- Linscott, Ivan R -- Reitsema, Harold J -- Reuter, Dennis C -- Showalter, Mark R -- Bray, Veronica J -- Chavez, Carrie L -- Howett, Carly J A -- Lauer, Tod R -- Lisse, Carey M -- Parker, Alex Harrison -- Porter, S B -- Robbins, Stuart J -- Runyon, Kirby -- Stryk, Ted -- Throop, Henry B -- Tsang, Constantine C C -- Verbiscer, Anne J -- Zangari, Amanda M -- Chaikin, Andrew L -- Wilhelms, Don E -- New Horizons Science Team -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 18;351(6279):1284-93. doi: 10.1126/science.aad7055.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center, Space Science Division, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA. jeff.moore@nasa.gov. ; Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA. ; Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302, USA. ; Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA. ; Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX 77058, USA. ; The SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center, Space Science Division, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA. ; University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. ; National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center, Space Science Division, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA. ; Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723, USA. ; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. ; NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91019, USA. ; Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001, USA. ; Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA. ; The SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA. ; University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA. ; National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719, USA. ; Roane State Community College, Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA. ; Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ 85719, USA. ; Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA. ; Independent Science Writer, Arlington, VT 05250, USA. ; U.S. Geological Survey, Retired, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26989245" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2016-03-19
    Description: The New Horizons mission has provided resolved measurements of Pluto's moons Styx, Nix, Kerberos, and Hydra. All four are small, with equivalent spherical diameters of ~40 kilometers for Nix and Hydra and ~10 kilometers for Styx and Kerberos. They are also highly elongated, with maximum to minimum axis ratios of ~2. All four moons have high albedos (~50 to 90%) suggestive of a water-ice surface composition. Crater densities on Nix and Hydra imply surface ages of at least 4 billion years. The small moons rotate much faster than synchronous, with rotational poles clustered nearly orthogonal to the common pole directions of Pluto and Charon. These results reinforce the hypothesis that the small moons formed in the aftermath of a collision that produced the Pluto-Charon binary.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Weaver, H A -- Buie, M W -- Buratti, B J -- Grundy, W M -- Lauer, T R -- Olkin, C B -- Parker, A H -- Porter, S B -- Showalter, M R -- Spencer, J R -- Stern, S A -- Verbiscer, A J -- McKinnon, W B -- Moore, J M -- Robbins, S J -- Schenk, P -- Singer, K N -- Barnouin, O S -- Cheng, A F -- Ernst, C M -- Lisse, C M -- Jennings, D E -- Lunsford, A W -- Reuter, D C -- Hamilton, D P -- Kaufmann, D E -- Ennico, K -- Young, L A -- Beyer, R A -- Binzel, R P -- Bray, V J -- Chaikin, A L -- Cook, J C -- Cruikshank, D P -- Dalle Ore, C M -- Earle, A M -- Gladstone, G R -- Howett, C J A -- Linscott, I R -- Nimmo, F -- Parker, J Wm -- Philippe, S -- Protopapa, S -- Reitsema, H J -- Schmitt, B -- Stryk, T -- Summers, M E -- Tsang, C C C -- Throop, H H B -- White, O L -- Zangari, A M -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 18;351(6279):aae0030. doi: 10.1126/science.aae0030.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723, USA. hal.weaver@jhuapl.edu. ; Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO 80302, USA. ; NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA. ; Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001, USA. ; National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 26732, USA. ; SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA. ; Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA. ; Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA. ; Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA. ; Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX 77058, USA. ; Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD 20723, USA. ; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA. ; Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA. ; SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA. Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035, USA. ; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. ; University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA. ; Independent science writer, Arlington, VT, USA. ; Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78238, USA. ; Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. ; University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. ; Universite Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble, France. ; Roane State Community College, Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA. ; George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA. ; Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ 85719, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26989256" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 334 (1988), S. 686-689 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] During the nights of 9-11 May 1988 we obtained g, r and i band images of Star X, the suspected optical counterpart5, using the 4-shooter6 on the 200-inch Hale Telescope. Images in all three filters were taken at orbital phases 0.79, 0.01 and 0.22, corresponding approximately to pulsar anti-eclipse, ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-06-01
    Description: The surface of Pluto is more geologically diverse and dynamic than had been expected, but the role of its tenuous atmosphere in shaping the landscape remains unclear. We describe observations from the New Horizons spacecraft of regularly spaced, linear ridges whose morphology, distribution, and orientation are consistent with being transverse dunes. These are located close to mountainous regions and are orthogonal to nearby wind streaks. We demonstrate that the wavelength of the dunes (~0.4 to 1 kilometer) is best explained by the deposition of sand-sized (~200 to ~300 micrometer) particles of methane ice in moderate winds (〈10 meters per second). The undisturbed morphology of the dunes, and relationships with the underlying convective glacial ice, imply that the dunes have formed in the very recent geological past.
    Keywords: Geochemistry, Geophysics, Planetary Science
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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