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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-09-18
    Description: MicroRNAs are an important regulator for T cell immune response. In this study, we aimed to identify microRNAs with the potential to regulate T cell differentiation. The influence of miR-143 on differentiation and function of CD8 + T cells from healthy donors were detected, and it was found that miR-143 overexpression could significantly increase the differentiation of central memory T (Tcm) CD8 + cells, decrease cell apoptosis, and increase proinflammatory cytokine secretion. Furthermore, the specific killing of HER2-CAR T cells against esophageal cancer cell line TE-7 was enhanced by miR-143 overexpression. Glucose transporter 1 (Glut-1) was identified as the critical target gene of miR-143 in the role of T cell regulation. By inhibition Glut-1, miR-143 inhibited glucose uptake and glycolysis in T cell to regulated T cell differentiation. Tcm cell populations were also suppressed in parallel with the downregulation of miR-143 in tumor tissues from 13 patients with esophagus cancer. IDO and its metabolite kynurenine in the tumor microenvironment were screened as an upstream regulator of miR-143. IDO small interfering RNA significantly increased the expression of miR-143 and Tcm cell population. In conclusion, our results show that miR-143 enhanced antitumor effects of T cell by promoting memory T cell differentiation and metabolism reprogramming through Glut-1. Our findings will encourage the development of new strategies targeting miR-143 in both cancer cells and T cells.
    Print ISSN: 0022-1767
    Electronic ISSN: 1550-6606
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-06-20
    Description: Objectives We aimed to evaluate the relation of total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels, and examine the possible modifiers in the association among a general population of Chinese adults. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting The study was conducted within 21 communities in Lianyungang of Jiangsu province, China. Participants A total of 26 648 participants aged ≥35 years and with no antihypertensive drug use were included in the final analysis. Results Overall, there was a positive association between tHcy concentrations and SBP (per 5 μmol/L tHcy increase: adjusted β=0.45 mm Hg; 95% CI 0.29 to 0.61) or DBP levels (per 5 μmol/L tHcy increase: adjusted β=0.47 mm Hg; 95% CI 0.35 to 0.59). Compared with participants with tHcy 〈10 μmol/L, significantly higher SBP levels were found in those with tHcy concentrations of 10 to 〈15 (adjusted β=0.80 mm Hg; 95% CI 0.32 to 1.28) and ≥15 µmol/L (adjusted β=1.79 mm Hg; 95% CI 1.20 to 2.37; p for trend 〈0.001). Consistently, significantly higher DBP levels were found in participants with tHcy concentrations of 10 to 〈15 (adjusted β=0.86 mm Hg; 95% CI 0.49 to 1.22) and ≥15 µmol/L (adjusted β=2.01 mm Hg; 95% CI 1.57 to 2.46; p for trend 〈0.001), respectively as compared with those with 〈10 μmol/L. Furthermore, a stronger association between tHcy and SBP (p for interaction=0.009) or DBP (p for interaction=0.067) was found in current alcohol drinkers. Conclusion Serum tHcy concentrations were positively associated with both SBP and DBP levels in a general Chinese adult population. The association was stronger in current alcohol drinkers.
    Keywords: Open access, Epidemiology
    Electronic ISSN: 2044-6055
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; POPULATION ; RISK ; CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC-LEUKEMIA ; FOLLICULAR LYMPHOMA ; TUMORIGENESIS ; NON-HODGKIN-LYMPHOMA ; COMMON VARIANTS ; NECROSIS-FACTOR TNF ; RAL GTPASES
    Abstract: Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma subtype and is clinically aggressive. To identify genetic susceptibility loci for DLBCL, we conducted a meta-analysis of 3 new genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and 1 previous scan, totaling 3,857 cases and 7,666 controls of European ancestry, with additional genotyping of 9 promising SNPs in 1,359 cases and 4,557 controls. In our multi-stage analysis, five independent SNPs in four loci achieved genome-wide significance marked by rs116446171 at 6p25.3 (EXOC2; P = 2.33 x 10-21), rs2523607 at 6p21.33 (HLA-B; P = 2.40 x 10-10), rs79480871 at 2p23.3 (NCOA1; P = 4.23 x 10-8) and two independent SNPs, rs13255292 and rs4733601, at 8q24.21 (PVT1; P = 9.98 x 10-13 and 3.63 x 10-11, respectively). These data provide substantial new evidence for genetic susceptibility to this B cell malignancy and point to pathways involved in immune recognition and immune function in the pathogenesis of DLBCL.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25261932
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  • 4
    Abstract: Evidence from a small number of studies suggests that longer telomere length measured in peripheral leukocytes is associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). However, these studies may be biased by reverse causation, confounded by unmeasured environmental exposures and might miss time points for which prospective telomere measurement would best reveal a relationship between telomere length and NHL risk. We performed an analysis of genetically inferred telomere length and NHL risk in a study of 10 102 NHL cases of the four most common B-cell histologic types and 9562 controls using a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising nine telomere length-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. This approach uses existing genotype data and estimates telomere length by weighing the number of telomere length-associated variant alleles an individual carries with the published change in kb of telomere length. The analysis of the telomere length GRS resulted in an association between longer telomere length and increased NHL risk [four B-cell histologic types combined; odds ratio (OR) = 1.49, 95% CI 1.22-1.82,P-value = 8.5 x 10(-5)]. Subtype-specific analyses indicated that chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) was the principal NHL subtype contributing to this association (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 1.93-3.51,P-value = 4.0 x 10(-10)). Significant interactions were observed across strata of sex for CLL/SLL and marginal zone lymphoma subtypes as well as age for the follicular lymphoma subtype. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase NHL risk, particularly risk of CLL/SLL, and are consistent with earlier studies relating longer telomere length with increased NHL risk.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27008888
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  • 5
    Keywords: RISK ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; BRCA2 MUTATIONS ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; ALLELES ; LOCI ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONFER SUSCEPTIBILITY ; COMMON VARIANTS ; IDENTIFIES 2
    Abstract: Background: Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Genome-wide association studies have identified FGFR2 as a breast cancer susceptibility gene. Common variation in other fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors might also modify risk. We tested this hypothesis by studying genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and imputed SNPs in FGFR1, FGFR3, FGFR4 and FGFRL1 in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Methods: Data were combined from 49 studies, including 53 835 cases and 50 156 controls, of which 89 050 (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) were of European ancestry, 12 893 (6269 cases and 6624 controls) of Asian and 2048 (1116 cases and 932 controls) of African ancestry. Associations with risk of breast cancer, overall and by disease sub-type, were assessed using unconditional logistic regression. Results: Little evidence of association with breast cancer risk was observed for SNPs in the FGF receptor genes. The strongest evidence in European women was for rs743682 in FGFR3; the estimated per-allele odds ratio was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 1.02-1.09, P=0.0020), which is substantially lower than that observed for SNPs in FGFR2. Conclusion: Our results suggest that common variants in the other FGF receptors are not associated with risk of breast cancer to the degree observed for FGFR2.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24548884
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; HEIGHT ; susceptibility loci ; SEQUENCE VARIANTS ; FGF10
    Abstract: Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most frequently diagnosed male cancer in developed countries. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study for PrCa and previously reported the results of the first two stages, which identified 16 PrCa susceptibility loci. We report here the results of stage 3, in which we evaluated 1,536 SNPs in 4,574 individuals with prostate cancer (cases) and 4,164 controls. We followed up ten new association signals through genotyping in 51,311 samples in 30 studies from the Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) consortium. In addition to replicating previously reported loci, we identified seven new prostate cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 2p11, 3q23, 3q26, 5p12, 6p21, 12q13 and Xq12 (P = 4.0 x 10(-8) to P = 2.7 x 10(-24)). We also identified a SNP in TERT more strongly associated with PrCa than that previously reported. More than 40 PrCa susceptibility loci, explaining similar to 25% of the familial risk in this disease, have now been identified
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21743467
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-07-22
    Description: Tumour oncogenes include transcription factors that co-opt the general transcriptional machinery to sustain the oncogenic state, but direct pharmacological inhibition of transcription factors has so far proven difficult. However, the transcriptional machinery contains various enzymatic cofactors that can be targeted for the development of new therapeutic candidates, including cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Here we present the discovery and characterization of a covalent CDK7 inhibitor, THZ1, which has the unprecedented ability to target a remote cysteine residue located outside of the canonical kinase domain, providing an unanticipated means of achieving selectivity for CDK7. Cancer cell-line profiling indicates that a subset of cancer cell lines, including human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL), have exceptional sensitivity to THZ1. Genome-wide analysis in Jurkat T-ALL cells shows that THZ1 disproportionally affects transcription of RUNX1 and suggests that sensitivity to THZ1 may be due to vulnerability conferred by the RUNX1 super-enhancer and the key role of RUNX1 in the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of these tumour cells. Pharmacological modulation of CDK7 kinase activity may thus provide an approach to identify and treat tumour types that are dependent on transcription for maintenance of the oncogenic state.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4244910/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4244910/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kwiatkowski, Nicholas -- Zhang, Tinghu -- Rahl, Peter B -- Abraham, Brian J -- Reddy, Jessica -- Ficarro, Scott B -- Dastur, Anahita -- Amzallag, Arnaud -- Ramaswamy, Sridhar -- Tesar, Bethany -- Jenkins, Catherine E -- Hannett, Nancy M -- McMillin, Douglas -- Sanda, Takaomi -- Sim, Taebo -- Kim, Nam Doo -- Look, Thomas -- Mitsiades, Constantine S -- Weng, Andrew P -- Brown, Jennifer R -- Benes, Cyril H -- Marto, Jarrod A -- Young, Richard A -- Gray, Nathanael S -- CA109901/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA178860-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- HG002668/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P01 NS047572/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P01 NS047572-10/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA014051/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA130876/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA130876-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA179483/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG002668/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R21 CA178860/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM008042/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG006097/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG006097-02/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jul 31;511(7511):616-20. doi: 10.1038/nature13393. Epub 2014 Jun 22.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3] Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [4]. ; 1] Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3]. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA [2] Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; 1] Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3] Blais Proteomics Center, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Medicine Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA. ; 1] Department of Medicine Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA [2] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, 7 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Terry Fox Laboratory, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada. ; 1] Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 117599 Singapore. ; Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1, Hawolgok-dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791, Korea, and KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, 145, Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713, Korea. ; Daegu-Gyeongbuk Medical Innovation Foundation, 2387 dalgubeol-daero, Suseong-gu, Daegu 706-010, Korea. ; 1] Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA [2] Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 USA. ; 1] Department of Cancer Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [2] Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043025" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation/drug effects ; Cell Survival/drug effects ; Core Binding Factor Alpha 2 Subunit/metabolism ; Cyclin-Dependent Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors ; Cysteine/metabolism ; Enzyme Inhibitors/*pharmacology ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/*drug effects ; Humans ; Jurkat Cells ; Phenylenediamines/*pharmacology ; Phosphorylation/drug effects ; Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/*enzymology ; Pyrimidines/*pharmacology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2013-03-09
    Description: Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been used as excellent standardizable candles for measuring cosmic expansion, but their progenitors are still elusive. Here, we report that the spectral diversity of SNe Ia is tied to their birthplace environments. We found that those with high-velocity ejecta are substantially more concentrated in the inner and brighter regions of their host galaxies than are normal-velocity SNe Ia. Furthermore, the former tend to inhabit larger and more luminous hosts. These results suggest that high-velocity SNe Ia likely originate from relatively younger and more metal-rich progenitors than do normal-velocity SNe Ia and are restricted to galaxies with substantial chemical evolution.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wang, Xiaofeng -- Wang, Lifan -- Filippenko, Alexei V -- Zhang, Tianmeng -- Zhao, Xulin -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Apr 12;340(6129):170-3. doi: 10.1126/science.1231502. Epub 2013 Mar 7.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. wang_xf@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23470733" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-10-30
    Description: The Sagnac speed metre topology has been identified as a promising technique to reduce quantum back-action in gravitational-wave interferometers. However, imbalance of the main beamsplitter has been shown to increase the coupling of laser noise to the detection port, thus reducing the quantum noise superiority of the speed metre, compared to conventional approaches, in particular at low frequencies. In this paper, we show that by implementing a balanced homodyne readout scheme with a suitable choice of the point from which the local oscillator (LO) is derived, the excess laser noise contribution is partly compensated, and the resulting speed metre can be more sensitive than state-of-the-art position metres. This is achieved by picking-off the LO from either the reflection port of the interferometer or the anti-reflective coating surface of the main beamsplitter. We show that either approach relaxes the relative intensity noise (RIN) requirement of the input laser. For example, f...
    Electronic ISSN: 1367-2630
    Topics: Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-11-02
    Description: Purpose: The goal of this study is to enhance the efficacy of imipridones, a novel class of AKT/ERK inhibitors that displayed limited therapeutic efficacy against glioblastoma (GBM). Experimental Design: Gene set enrichment, LC/MS, and extracellular flux analyses were used to determine the mechanism of action of novel imipridone compounds, ONC206 and ONC212. Orthotopic patient-derived xenografts were utilized to evaluate therapeutic potency. Results: Imipridones reduce the proliferation of patient-derived xenograft and stem-like glioblastoma cell cultures in vitro and in multiple xenograft models in vivo . ONC212 displayed the highest potency. High levels of c-myc predict susceptibility to growth inhibition and apoptosis induction by imipridones and increased host survival in orthotopic patient-derived xenografts. As early as 1 hour, imipridones elicit on-target inhibition, followed by dephosphorylation of GSK3β at serine 9. GSK3β promotes phosphorylation of c-myc at threonine 58 and enhances its proteasomal degradation. Moreover, inhibition of c-myc by BRD4 antagonists sensitizes for imipridone-induced apoptosis in stem-like GBM cells in vitro and in vivo . Imipridones affect energy metabolism by suppressing both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation, which is accompanied by a compensatory activation of the serine-one carbon-glycine (SOG) pathway, involving the transcription factor ATF4. Interference with the SOG pathway through novel inhibitors of PHGDH results in synergistic cell death induction in vitro and in vivo . Conclusions: These results suggest that c-myc expression predicts therapeutic responses to imipridones and that imipridones lead to suppression of tumor cell energy metabolism, eliciting unique metabolic vulnerabilities that can be exploited for clinical relevant drug combination therapies. Clin Cancer Res; 24(21); 5392–406. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
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