Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; TRIAL ; hormone ; HEALTH ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; OBESITY ; risk factors ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; RISK FACTOR ; EPIC ; EPIC study ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MASS INDEX ; PH ; WEIGHT ; body weight ; fat distribution ; HEIGHT ; ADIPOSITY ; breast neoplasm ; HORMONE-REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; METAANALYSIS
    Abstract: The evidence for anthropometric factors influencing breast cancer risk is accumulating, but uncertainties remain concerning the role of fat distribution and potential effect modifiers. We used data from 73,542 premenopausal and 103,344 postmenopausal women from 9 European countries, taking part in the EPIC study. RRs from Cox regression models were calculated, using measured height, weight, BMI and waist and hip circumferences; categorized by cohort wide quintiles; and expressed as continuous variables, adjusted for study center, age and other risk factors. During 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,879 incident invasive breast cancers were identified. In postmenopausal women, current HRT modified the body size-breast cancer association. Among nonusers, weight, BMI and hip circumference were positively associated with breast cancer risk (all P-trend less than or equal to 0.002); obese women (BMI 〉 30) had a 31% excess risk compared to women with BMI 〈 25. Among HRT users, body measures were inversely but nonsignificantly associated with breast cancer. Excess breast cancer risk with HRT was particularly evident among lean women. Pooled RRs per height increment of 5 cm were 1.05 (95% CI 1.00-1.16) in premenopausal and 1.10 (95% CI 1.05-1.16) in postmenopausal women. Among premenopausal women, hip circumference was the only other measure significantly related to breast cancer (P-trend = 0.03), after accounting for BMI. In postmenopausal women not taking exogenous hormones, general obesity is a significant predictor of breast cancer, while abdominal fat assessed as waist-hip ratio or waist circumference was not related to excess risk when adjusted for BMI. Among premenopausal women, weight and BMI showed nonsignificant inverse associations with breast cancer. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15252848
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; CANCER ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; proliferation ; tumor ; CELL-PROLIFERATION ; PATHWAY ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; TUMORS ; RELEASE ; PATIENT ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; VARIANTS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; SOMATOSTATIN ; CANCER PATIENTS ; nutrition ; FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN ; SERUM ; SINGLE ; IGF-I ; BINDING-PROTEIN ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; VARIANT ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; cell proliferation ; development ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; GENOTYPE DATA ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; IGFBP3 ; insulin-like growth factor ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; SERUM-LEVELS
    Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) stimulates cell proliferation and can enhance the development of tumors in different organs. Epidemiologic studies have shown that an elevated level of circulating IGF-I is associated to increased risk of breast cancer as well as other cancers. Genetic variants affecting the release or biological action of growth hormone (GH), the main stimulator of IGF-I production, may predict circulating levels of IGF-I and have an effect on cancer risk. We tested this hypothesis with a large case-control study of 807 breast cancer patients and 1,588 matched control subjects nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. We genotyped 22 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in 10 genes involved in GH production and action (GHRH, GHRHR, SST, SSTR1-SSTR5, POU1F1, and GH1), and in parallel, we measured serum levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3, its major binding protein, in samples of cases and controls. SST and SSTR2 polymorphisms showed weak but statistically significant associations with breast cancer risk. SSTR5 polymorphisms were associated with IGF-I levels, whereas one polymorphism in GHRHR and one in POU1F1 were associated with IGFBP-3 levels. Our conclusion is that common genetic variation in the GH synthesis pathway, as measured by single nucleotide polymorphisms selected in the present study, is not a major determinant of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 circulating levels, and it does not play a major role in altering breast cancer risk
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16214911
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Keywords: Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; TIME ; PATIENT ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; WOMEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; BETA ; DIET ; INDIVIDUALS ; time trends ; TRENDS ; EUROPE ; DENMARK ; BREAST-CANCER RISK ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; STANDARD ; ADULT ; RE ; DETERMINANTS ; BODY-SIZE ; HEIGHT ; PARTICIPANTS ; BIRTH ; body height ; menarche ; SECULAR TRENDS ; URINE ESTROGENS
    Abstract: In the last two centuries, age at menarche has decreased in several European populations, whereas adult height has increased. It is unclear whether these trends have ceased in recent years or how age at menarche and height are related in individuals. In this study, the authors first investigated trends in age at menarche and adult height among 286,205 women from nine European countries by computing the mean age at menarche and height in 5-year birth cohorts, adjusted for differences in socioeconomic status. Second, the relation between age at menarche and height was estimated by linear regression models, adjusted for age at enrollment between 1992 and 1998 and socioeconomic status. Mean age at menarche decreased by 44 days per 5-year birth cohort (beta = -0.12, standard error = 0.002), varying from 18 days in the United Kingdom to 58 days in Spain and Germany. Women grew 0.29 cm taller per 5-year birth cohort (standard error = 0.007), varying from 0.42 cm in Italy to 0.98 cm in Denmark. Furthermore, women grew approximately 0.31 cm taller when menarche occurred 1 year later (range by country: 0.13-0.50 cm). Based on time trends, more recent birth cohorts have their menarche earlier and grow taller. However, women with earlier menarche reach a shorter adult height compared with women who have menarche at a later age
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16107566
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; PROTEIN ; BINDING ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; lifestyle ; ASSAY ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; case-control studies ; BODY ; body mass index ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; FACTOR-I ; LIFE-STYLE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; BINDING PROTEIN ; MASS INDEX ; SERUM ; IGF-I ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; REPRODUCTIVE FACTORS ; RE ; WEIGHT ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; WAIST ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; ASSAYS ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM-LEVELS ; HORMONES ; BMI ; cross-sectional studies ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; IGFBP-3 ; hip ; ENDOGENOUS HORMONES ; FACTOR BINDING-PROTEIN-3 CONCENTRATIONS ; HORMONE-BINDING-PROTEIN ; nonlinear ; NUTRITIONAL REGULATION ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; waist-hip ratio
    Abstract: Objective: To examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and waist-hip ratio (WHR) with serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and its binding protein (IGFBP)-3. Design: Cross-sectional study on 2139 women participating in a case-control study on breast cancer and endogenous hormones. Data on lifestyle and reproductive factors were collected by means of questionnaires. Body height, weight, waist and hip circumferences were measured. Serum levels of IGF-I and insulin-like binding protein (IGFBP)-3 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Adjusted mean levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 across quintiles of BMI, waist circumference, and WHR were calculated by linear regression. Results were adjusted for potential confounders associated with IGF-I and IGFBP-3. Results: Adjusted mean serum IGF-I values were lower in women with BMI 〈 22.5 kg/m(2) or BMI 〉 29.2 kg/m(2) compared to women with BMI within this range (P-heterogeneity 〈 0.0001, P-trend = 0.35). Insulin-like growth factor-I was not related to WHR after adjustment for BMI. IGF-binding protein-3 was linearly positively related to waist and WHR after mutual adjustment. The molar ratio IGF-I/IGFBP-3 had a non-linear relation with BMI and a linear inverse relationship with WHR (P-trend = 0.005). Conclusions: Our data confirm the nonlinear relationship of circulating IGF-I to total adiposity in women. Serum IGFBP-3 was positively related to central adiposity. These suggest that bioavailable IGF-I levels could be lower in obese compared to non-obese women and inversely related to central adiposity
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16552400
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; RISK ; PROTEIN ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; WOMEN ; Jun ; LIFE-STYLE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; insulin ; IGF-I ; BINDING-PROTEIN ; RE ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; BINDING PROTEIN-3 ; anthropometry ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; ENERGY-BALANCE ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; POLYCYSTIC-OVARY-SYNDROME ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; sex-steroid hormones
    Abstract: Objectives: The risk of some cancers is positively associated with body weight, which may influence circulating levels of sex-steroid hormones, insulin and IGF-I. Interrelationships between these hormones and the associations with adiposity were evaluated in healthy women participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed on anthropometric and hormonal data from 743 pre- and 1217 postmenopausal women. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were used as indicators of adiposity. C-peptide, Insulin Growth Factor (IGF)-I, Insulin Growth Factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3, androgens, estrogens and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured by immunoassays; free sex steroid concentrations were calculated. Results: BMI and waist circumference were positively correlated with estrogens in postmenopausal women and with C-peptide, free testosterone and inversely with SHBG in all women. C-peptide and IGF-I were inversely correlated with SHBG, and positively with free sex steroids in postmenopausal women. IGF-I was positively associated with postmenopausal estrogens and androgen concentrations in all women. Conclusions: Sex-steroid concentrations appear to be regulated along several axes. Adiposity correlated directly with estrogens in postmenopausal women and with insulin, resulting in lower SHBG and increased levels of free sex steroids. Independent of adiposity and insulin, IGF-I was associated with decreased SHBG levels, and increased concentrations of androgens and postmenopausal estrogens
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15986111
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; RISK ; TIME ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; BODY ; EPIC ; nutrition ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; insulin ; MASS INDEX ; SERUM ; case-control study ; RE ; INCREASE ; WEIGHT ; WAIST ; ESTROGEN ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; metabolic syndrome ; OVERWEIGHT ; HORMONES ; BMI ; EXTENT ; CANCER-RISK ; BODY-FAT DISTRIBUTION ; hip ; steroids ; FREE ESTRADIOL
    Abstract: In a large case-control study on breast cancer risk and serum hormone concentrations, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, we examined to what extent the relationship of excess body weight with breast cancer risk may be explained by changes in sex steroids. Height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, and serum measurements of testosterone [T], androstenedione [Delta(4)], dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate [DHEAS], estradiol [E-2], estrone [E-1] and sex-hormone binding globulin [SHBG] were available for 613 breast cancer cases, and 1,139 matched controls, who were all menopausal at the time of blood donation. Free T [fT] and free E-2 [fE(2)] were calculated using mass action equations. Breast cancer risk was related to body mass index (BMI) (RR = 1.11 [0.99-1.25], per 5 kg/m(2) increase in BMI), and waist (RR = 1.12 [1.02-1.24], per 10 cm increase) and hip circumferences (RR = 1.14 [1.02-1.27], per 10 cm increase). The increase in breast cancer risk associated with adiposity was substantially reduced after adjustment for any estrogens, especially for fE(2) (from 1.11 [0.99-1.25] to 0.99 [0.87-1.12], from 1.12 [1.02-1.24] to 1.02 [0.92-1.14] and from 1.14 [1.02-1.27] to 1.05 [0.93-1.18] for BMI, waist and hip circumferences, respectively). A modest attenuation in excess risk was observed after adjustment for fT, but the remaining androgens had little effect on the association of body adiposity with breast cancer. Our data indicate that the relationship of adiposity with breast cancer in postmenopausal women could be partially explained by the increases in endogenous estrogens, and by a decrease in levels of SHBG. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16385576
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; RISK ; TISSUE ; MARKER ; RATS ; CONTRAST ; BINDING ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; AGE ; WOMEN ; REDUCED RISK ; cancer risk ; GLUCOSE ; EPIC ; nutrition ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; insulin ; SERUM ; IGF-I ; REGRESSION ; RE ; INCREASE ; WEIGHT ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; LEVEL ; INTERVAL ; pancreatic ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; SERUM-LEVELS ; MAMMARY-CARCINOMA ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; C-PEPTIDE ; steroids ; FREE ESTRADIOL ; HEPATIC EXTRACTION ; PLASMA-INSULIN ; SEX-HORMONES
    Abstract: It has been hypothesized that chronic hyperinsulinemia, a major metabolic consequence of physical inactivity and excess weight, might increase breast cancer risk by direct effects on breast tissue or indirectly by increasing bioavailable levels of testosterone and estradiol. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), we measured serum levels of C-peptide-a marker for pancreatic insulin secretion-in a total of 1,141 incident cases of breast cancer and 2,204 matched control subjects. Additional measurements were made of serum sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) and sex steroids. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate breast cancer risk for different levels of C-peptide. C-peptide was inversely correlated with SHBG and hence directly correlated with free testosterone among both pre and postmenopausal women. C-peptide and free estradiol also correlated positively, but only among postmenopausal women. Elevated serum C-peptide levels were associated with a nonsignificant reduced risk of breast cancer diagnosed up to the age of 50 years [odds ratio (OR) = 0.70, (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.39-1.24); P-trend = 0.05]. By contrast, higher levels of C-peptide were associated with an increase of breast cancer risk among women above 60 years of age, however only among those women who had provided a blood sample under nonfasting conditions [OR = 2.03, (95% CI, 1.20-3.43); P-trend = 0.011. Our results do not support the hypothesis that chronic hyperinsulinemia generally increases breast cancer risk, independently of age. Nevertheless, among older, postmenopausal women, 6yperinsulinemia might contribute to increasing breast cancer risk. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16572422
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; proliferation ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; PATIENT ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; WOMEN ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FACTOR-I ; SERUM ; IGF-I ; RE ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; CANDIDATE GENES ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; single-nucleotide ; GENOTYPE DATA ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; SERUM-LEVELS ; ALPHA-5-BETA-1 INTEGRIN ; C-PEPTIDE ; IGFALS ; IGFBP-1 ; IGFBP-3 ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT
    Abstract: Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) stimulates cell proliferation and can enhance the development of tumours in different organs. Epidemiological studies have shown that an elevated level of circulating IGF-1 is associated with increased risk of breast cancer, as well as of other cancers. Most of circulating IGF-I is bound to an acid-labile subunit and to one of six insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs), among which the most important are IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-1. Polymorphisms of the IGF1 gene and of genes encoding for the major IGF-1 carriers may predict circulating levels of IGF-1 and have an impact on cancer risk. We tested this hypothesis with a case - control study of 807 breast cancer patients and 1588 matched control subjects, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. We genotyped 23 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in IGF1, IGFBP1, IGFBP3 and IGFALS, and measured serum levels of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in samples of cases and controls. We found a weak but significant association of polymorphisms at the 50 end of the IGF1 gene with breast cancer risk, particularly among women younger than 55 years, and a strong association of polymorphisms located in the 50 end of IGFBP3 with circulating levels of IGFBP-3, which confirms previous findings. Common genetic variation in these candidate genes does not play a major role in altering breast cancer risk in Caucasians
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16404426
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; GROWTH-FACTOR ; tumor ; BLOOD ; DIAGNOSIS ; RISK ; TIME ; REDUCTION ; BINDING ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; AGE ; WOMEN ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; SWEDEN ; cancer risk ; Jun ; INVOLVEMENT ; case-control studies ; EPIC ; nutrition ; FACTOR-I ; insulin ; YOUNG ; SERUM ; IGF-I ; case-control study ; RE ; INCREASE ; METAANALYSIS ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; prospective ; prospective study ; odds ratio ; CANCER-RISK ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; C-PEPTIDE ; IGFBP-3 ; NORTHERN ; FACTOR-BINDING-PROTEINS
    Abstract: Blood concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) have recently been associated with breast cancer risk, notably in women who developed breast cancer at a young age. Prospective studies published so far, however, were relatively small and odds ratio (OR) estimates imprecise. We present the results of a large prospective case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition on total IGIF-I, IGFBP-3 and breast cancer risk including 1081 incident cases of invasive breast cancer and 2098 matched control subjects. Increasing IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations were associated with a significant increase in breast cancer risk in women who developed breast cancer after 50 years of age (highest vs lowest quintile OR 1.38 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.86), P = 0.01, and 1.44 (95% CI 1.04-1.98), P = 0.01, respectively), but no relationship was observed in younger women (OR = 1.03 (95% CI 0.60-1.77), P = 0.81 for IGF-I, and OR = 0.92 (95% CI 0.50-1.70), P = 0.69 for IGFBP-3). There was, however, significant heterogeneity in the relationship of breast cancer with serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels depending on the time interval between blood donation and tumor diagnosis. A reduction in breast cancer risk with increasing IGF-I concentrations was observed in cases with a diagnosis of cancer less than 2 years after blood donation, (OR = 0.76 (95% CI 0.57-1.03)), while an increase in risk was observed for women with a later diagnosis (above or equal to two years after blood collection, OR = 1.51 (95% CI 1.19-1.91)). A similar pattern was observed for IGFBP-3. This study confirms previous findings for an association of serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations with breast cancer risk, particularly for women with a later diagnosis of cancer, but it does not support the hypothesis of an involvement of IGF-I in younger women
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16728585
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...