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  • 1
    Keywords: BIOLOGY, Blood-testis (Sertoli cell) barrier, CELL, CELLS, CELL-SELECTIVE KNOCKOUT, claudins, DEFECT
    Abstract: One of the major roles of Sertoli cells is to establish the blood-testis (Sertoli cell) barrier (BTB), which is permanently assembled and disassembled to accommodate the translocation of leptotene spermatocytes from the basal into the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium and to guarantee completion of meiosis and spermiogenesis. Recently, we have demonstrated spermatogenesis to be arrested before spermatid elongation in Gnpat-null mice with selective deficiency of ether lipids (ELs) whose functions are poorly understood. In this study, we have focused on the spatio-temporal expression of several BTB tight-junctional proteins in the first wave of spermatogenesis to obtain insights into the physiological role of ELs during BTB establishment and dynamics. Our data confirm the transient existence of Russell's intermediate or translocation compartment delineated by two separate claudin-3-positive luminal and basal tight junctions and reveal that EL deficiency blocks BTB remodeling. This block is associated with (1) downregulation and mistargeting of claudin-3 and (2) impaired BTB disassembly resulting in deficient sealing of the intermediate compartment as shown by increased BTB permeability to biotin. These results suggest that ELs are essential for cyclic BTB dynamics ensuring the sluice mechanism for leptotene translocation into the adluminal compartment
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19495798
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  • 2
    Keywords: CELL-PROLIFERATION ; OXIDATIVE STRESS ; RAT-BRAIN ; MEMBRANE-FUSION ; TRANSMITTER RELEASE ; unfolded protein response ; GUINEA-PIG ; GLUTAMATE RELEASE ; PEROXISOMAL DISORDERS ; RAPID METHOD
    Abstract: Isolated defects of ether lipid (EL) biosynthesis in humans cause rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 2 and type 3, serious peroxisomal disorders. Using a previously described mouse model [Rodemer, C., Thai, T.P., Brugger, B., Kaercher, T., Werner, H., Nave, K.A., Wieland, F., Gorgas, K., and Just, W.W. (2003) Inactivation of ether lipid biosynthesis causes male infertility, defects in eye development and optic nerve hypoplasia in mice. Hum. Mol. Genet., 12, 18811895], we investigated the effect of EL deficiency in isolated murine nerve terminals (synaptosomes) on the pre-synaptic release of the neurotransmitters (NTs) glutamate and acetylcholine. Both Ca-2-dependent exocytosis and Ca-2-independent efflux of the transmitters were affected. EL-deficient synaptosomes respire at a reduced rate and exhibit a lowered adenosin-5-triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate (ATP/ADP) ratio. Consequently, ATP-driven processes, such as synaptic vesicle cycling and maintenance of Na, K and Ca-2 homeostasis, might be disturbed. Analyzing reactive oxygen species in EL-deficient neural and non-neural tissues revealed that plasmalogens (PLs), the most abundant EL species in mammalian central nervous system, considerably contribute to the generation of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde. Although EL-deficient tissue contains less lipid peroxidation products, fibroblasts lacking ELs are more susceptible to induced oxidative stress. In summary, these results suggest that due to the reduced energy state of EL-deficient tissue, the Ca-2-independent efflux of NTs increases while the Ca-2-dependent release declines. Furthermore, lack of PLs is mainly compensated for by an increase in the concentration of phosphatidylethanolamine and results in a significantly lowered level of lipid peroxidation products in the brain cortex and cerebellum
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22403185
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] Malpighian tubules were removed from larvae and dried, ground and packed in capillary tubes for powder X-ray diffraction. Exposure time was 12 h using a copper target and nickel filter (Ka-1.54). The diffraction patterns and d-spacings of silkworm crystals were compared with known calcium oxalate ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] During the differentiation of erythrocytes some cells develop which contain a high concentration of haemoglobin and no cytoplasmic basophilia. Erythropoietin has the effect of increasing the proportion of these cells in preparations of marrow. Two of the communications which follow discuss the ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    ISSN: 0003-9861
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-01-17
    Description: CD4 T cells promote innate and adaptive immune responses, but how vaccine-elicited CD4 T cells contribute to immune protection remains unclear. We evaluated whether induction of virus-specific CD4 T cells by vaccination would protect mice against infection with chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Immunization with vaccines that selectively induced CD4 T cell responses resulted in catastrophic inflammation and mortality after challenge with a persistent strain of LCMV. Immunopathology required antigen-specific CD4 T cells and was associated with a cytokine storm, generalized inflammation, and multi-organ system failure. Virus-specific CD8 T cells or antibodies abrogated the pathology. These data demonstrate that vaccine-elicited CD4 T cells in the absence of effective antiviral immune responses can trigger lethal immunopathology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4382081/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4382081/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo -- Barber, Daniel L -- Wherry, E John -- Provine, Nicholas M -- Teigler, Jeffrey E -- Parenteau, Lily -- Blackmore, Stephen -- Borducchi, Erica N -- Larocca, Rafael A -- Yates, Kathleen B -- Shen, Hao -- Haining, W Nicholas -- Sommerstein, Rami -- Pinschewer, Daniel D -- Ahmed, Rafi -- Barouch, Dan H -- AI007245/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI030048/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI07387/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI078526/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- AI096040/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P51 OD011132/OD/NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI007245/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI078526/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U19 AI096040/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jan 16;347(6219):278-82. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa2148.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA. ; Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. ; Department of Microbiology and Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. ; Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, WHO Collaborating Centre for Vaccine Immunology, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. ; Department of Pathology and Immunology, WHO Collaborating Centre for Vaccine Immunology, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland. Department of Biomedicine-Haus Petersplatz, Division of Experimental Virology, University of Basel, 4009 Basel, Switzerland. ; Emory Vaccine Center and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. ; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, Boston, MA 02114, USA. dbarouch@bidmc.harvard.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25593185" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptive Immunity ; Animals ; Antibodies, Viral/immunology ; Antigens, Viral/immunology ; Arenaviridae Infections/*immunology/virology ; CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/*immunology ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology ; Cytokines/blood ; Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology ; Immune System Diseases/*etiology/immunology/pathology ; Immunologic Memory ; Inflammation/*etiology/immunology/pathology ; Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus/*immunology/physiology ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Multiple Organ Failure/etiology ; Vaccination ; Viral Load ; Viral Vaccines/*adverse effects/*immunology ; Virus Replication
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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