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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; RISK ; RISKS ; PATIENT ; RISK-FACTORS ; BINDING ; CYCLE ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; EPIC ; nutrition ; ESTRADIOL ; SERUM ; SINGLE ; DEFICIENCY ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; MAMMARY-GLAND ; ESTROGEN ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; TESTS ; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM-LEVELS ; ADRENAL ANDROGENS ; ESTROGEN PLUS PROGESTIN ; FEMALE NOBLE RATS ; HEALTHY POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; HORMONE LEVELS ; ONE-YEAR PERIOD ; REPLACEMENT THERAPY
    Abstract: Background. Contrasting etiologic hypotheses about the role of endogenous sex steroids in breast cancer development among premenopausal women implicate ovarian androgen excess and progesterone deficiency, estrogen excess, estrogen and progesterone excess, and both an excess or lack of adrenal androgens (dehydroepiandrosterone [DHEA] or its sulfate [DHEAS]) as risk factors. We conducted a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort to examine associations among premenopausal serum concentrations of sex steroids and subsequent breast cancer risk. Methods: Levels of DHEAS, (Delta 4-)androstenedione, testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured in single prediagnostic serum samples from 370 premenopausal women who subsequently developed breast cancer (case patients) and from 726 matched cancer-free control subjects. Levels of progesterone, estrone, and estradiol were also measured for the 285 case patients and 555 matched control subjects who had provided information about the day of menstrual cycle at blood donation. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate relative risks of breast cancer by quartiles of hormone concentrations. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Increased risks of breast cancer were associated with elevated serum concentrations of testosterone (odds ratio [OR] for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.16 to 2.57; P-trend =.01), androstenedione (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.569 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.32; P-trend =.01), and DHEAS (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.02 to 2.14; P-trend =.10) but not SHBG. Elevated serum progesterone concentrations were associated with a statistically significant reduction in breast cancer risk (OR for highest versus lowest quartile = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.38 to 0.98; P-trend =.06). The absolute risk of breast cancer for women younger than 40 followed up for 10 years was estimated at 2.6% for those in the highest quartile of serum testosterone versus 1.5% for those in the lowest quartile; for the highest and lowest quartiles of progesterone, these estimates were 1.7% and 2.6%, respectively. Breast cancer risk was not statistically significantly associated with serum levels
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15900045
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; DIETARY ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; questionnaires ; VEGETABLES ; NUTRIENTS ; carotenoids ; DIETARY FACTORS ; DETERMINANTS ; SUBTYPE ; FRUITS ; PART ; PARTICIPANTS ; CANCER INCIDENCE ; ALLIUM VEGETABLES ; FOOD GROUPS
    Abstract: Objective: The association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and risk of ovarian cancer is still unclear from a prospective point of view. Methods: Female participants (n = 325,640) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study, free of any cancer at baseline, were followed on average for 6.3 years to develop ovarian cancer. During 2,049,346 person-years, 581 verified cases of primary, invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were accrued. Consumption of fruits and vegetables as well as subgroups of vegetables, estimated from validated dietary questionnaires and calibrated thereafter, was related to ovarian cancer incidence in multivariable hazard regression models. Histologic subtype specific analyses were done. Results: Total intake of fruit and vegetables, separately or combined, as well as subgroups of vegetables (fruiting, root, leafy vegetables, cabbages) was unrelated to risk of ovarian cancer. A high intake of garlic/onion vegetables was associated with a borderline significant reduced risk of this cancer. The examination by histologic subtype indicated some differential effects of fruit and vegetable intake on ovarian cancer risk. Conclusion: Overall, a high intake of fruits and vegetables did not seem to protect from ovarian cancer. Garlic/onion vegetables may exert a beneficial effect. The study of the histologic subtype of the tumor warrants further investigation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16284374
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  • 3
    Abstract: Despite the potential cancer preventive effects of flavonoids and lignans, their ability to reduce pancreatic cancer risk has not been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. Our aim was to examine the association between dietary intakes of flavonoids and lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. A total of 865 exocrine pancreatic cancer cases occurred after 11.3 years of follow-up of 477,309 cohort members. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake was estimated through validated dietary questionnaires and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Phenol Explorer databases. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using age, sex and center-stratified Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for energy intake, body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol and diabetes status. Our results showed that neither overall dietary intake of flavonoids nor of lignans were associated with pancreatic cancer risk (multivariable-adjusted HR for a doubling of intake = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.95-1.11 and 1.02; 95% CI: 0.89-1.17, respectively). Statistically significant associations were also not observed by flavonoid subclasses. An inverse association between intake of flavanones and pancreatic cancer risk was apparent, without reaching statistical significance, in microscopically confirmed cases (HR for a doubling of intake = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91-1.00). In conclusion, we did not observe an association between intake of flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses or lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC cohort.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27184434
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; cohort study ; RISK ; SITE ; INFECTION ; ASSOCIATION ; antibodies ; WOMEN ; MEN ; COUNTRIES ; DIET ; STOMACH ; adenocarcinoma ; case-control studies ; CARDIA ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; case-control study ; INCREASE ; case control studies ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI INFECTION ; prospective ; Helicobacter pylori ; intake ; FOODS
    Abstract: It is considered that fruit and vegetable (F&V) protect against oesophagus and gastric cancer (GC). However, 2 recent meta-analyses suggest that the strength of association on GC seems to he weaker for vegetables than for fruit and weaker in cohort than in case-control studies. No evidence exists from cohort studies about adenocarcinoma of oesophagus (ACO). In 521,457 men and women participating in the EPIC cohort in 10 European countries, information of diet and lifestyle was collected at baseline. After an average of 6.5 years of follow-up, a total of 330 GC and 65 ACO, confirmed and classified by a panel of pathologists, was used for the analysis. We examined the relation between F&V intake and GC and ACO. A calibration study in a sub-sample was used to control diet measurement errors. In a sub-sample of cases and a random sample of controls, antibodies against Helicobacter pylori (Hp) were measured and interactions with F&V were examined in a nested case-control study. We observed no association with total vegetable intake or specific groups of vegetables and GC risk, except for the intestinal type, where a negative association is possible regarding total vegetable (calibrated HR 0.66; 95% CI 0.35-1.22 per 100 g increase) and onion and garlic intake (calibrated HR 0.70; 95% CI 0.38-1.29 per 10 g increase). No evidence of association between fresh fruit intake and GC risk was observed. We found a negative but non significant association between citrus fruit intake and the cardia site (calibrated HR 0.77; 95% CI 0.47-1.22 per 100 g increase) while no association was observed with the non-cardia site. Regarding ACO, we found a non significant negative association for vegetable intake and for citrus intake (calibrated HRs 0.72; 95% Cl 0.32-1.64 and 0.77; 95% CI 0.46-1.28 per 100 and 50 g increase, respectively). It seems that lip infection does not modify the effect of F&V intake. Our study supports a possible protective role of vegetable intake in the intestinal type of GC and the ACO. Citrus fruit consumption may have a role in the protection against cardia GC and ACO. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16380980
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; GROWTH ; PROTEIN ; BINDING ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; lifestyle ; ASSAY ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; case-control studies ; BODY ; body mass index ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; FACTOR-I ; LIFE-STYLE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; BINDING PROTEIN ; MASS INDEX ; SERUM ; IGF-I ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; REPRODUCTIVE FACTORS ; RE ; WEIGHT ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; WAIST ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; ASSAYS ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM-LEVELS ; HORMONES ; BMI ; cross-sectional studies ; CIRCULATING LEVELS ; IGFBP-3 ; hip ; ENDOGENOUS HORMONES ; FACTOR BINDING-PROTEIN-3 CONCENTRATIONS ; HORMONE-BINDING-PROTEIN ; nonlinear ; NUTRITIONAL REGULATION ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; waist-hip ratio
    Abstract: Objective: To examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and waist-hip ratio (WHR) with serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and its binding protein (IGFBP)-3. Design: Cross-sectional study on 2139 women participating in a case-control study on breast cancer and endogenous hormones. Data on lifestyle and reproductive factors were collected by means of questionnaires. Body height, weight, waist and hip circumferences were measured. Serum levels of IGF-I and insulin-like binding protein (IGFBP)-3 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Adjusted mean levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 across quintiles of BMI, waist circumference, and WHR were calculated by linear regression. Results were adjusted for potential confounders associated with IGF-I and IGFBP-3. Results: Adjusted mean serum IGF-I values were lower in women with BMI 〈 22.5 kg/m(2) or BMI 〉 29.2 kg/m(2) compared to women with BMI within this range (P-heterogeneity 〈 0.0001, P-trend = 0.35). Insulin-like growth factor-I was not related to WHR after adjustment for BMI. IGF-binding protein-3 was linearly positively related to waist and WHR after mutual adjustment. The molar ratio IGF-I/IGFBP-3 had a non-linear relation with BMI and a linear inverse relationship with WHR (P-trend = 0.005). Conclusions: Our data confirm the nonlinear relationship of circulating IGF-I to total adiposity in women. Serum IGFBP-3 was positively related to central adiposity. These suggest that bioavailable IGF-I levels could be lower in obese compared to non-obese women and inversely related to central adiposity
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16552400
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  • 6
    Keywords: RISK ; AGE ; WOMEN ; POLYPHENOLS ; GREECE ; CALIBRATION ; HEART-DISEASE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; ADULTS ; ESOPHAGEAL CANCER ; intake ; nonsmokers ; Anthocyanidins ; DIETARY FLAVONOID INTAKE ; EPIC-Europe ; Food sources ; LONG-ISLAND
    Abstract: Anthocyanidins are bioactive flavonoids with potential health-promoting effects. These may vary among single anthocyanidins considering differences in their bioavailability and some of the mechanisms involved. The aim of the present study was to estimate the dietary intake of anthocyanidins, their food sources and the lifestyle factors (sex, age, BMI, smoking status, educational level and physisical activity) involved among twenty-seven centres in ten European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Anthocyanidin intake and their food sources for 36 037 subjects, aged between 35 and 74 years, in twenty-seven redefined centres were obtained using standardised 24 h dietary recall software (EPIC-SOFT). An ad hoc food composition database on anthocyanidins (cyanidin, delphinidin, malvidin, pelargonidin, peonidin, petunidin) was compiled using data from the US Department of Agriculture and Phenol-Explorer databases and was expanded by adding recipes, estimated values and cooking factors. For men, the total anthocyanidin mean intake ranged from 19.83 (SE 1.53) mg/d (Bilthoven, The Netherlands) to 64.88 (SE 1.86) mg/d (Turin, Italy), whereas for women the range was 18.73 (SE 2.80) mg/d (Granada, Spain) to 44.08 (SE 2.45) mg/d (Turin, Italy). A clear south to north gradient intake was observed. Cyanidins and malvidins were the main anthocynidin contributors depending on the region and sex. Anthocyanidin intake was higher in non-obese older females, non-smokers, and increased with educational level and physical activity. The major food sources were fruits, wine, non-alcoholic beverages and some vegetables. The present study shows differences in both total and individual anthocyanidin intakes and various lifestyle factors throughout Europe, with some geographical variability in their food sources
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21481290
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK ; METABOLISM ; prevention ; POLYPHENOLS ; DIET ; VALIDITY ; EPIC ; FRUIT ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; Mediterranean diet ; ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY ; stomach cancer ; Longitudinal Studies ; EPIC-EURGAST ; IN-VITRO ASSAYS
    Abstract: A high intake of dietary antioxidant compounds has been hypothesized to be an appropriate strategy to reduce gastric cancer (GC) development. We investigated the effect of dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in relation to GC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC) study including 23 centers in 10 European countries. A total of 521,457 subjects (153,447 men) aged mostly 3570 years old, were recruited largely between 1992 and 1998. Ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP), measuring reducing and chain-breaking antioxidant capacity were used to measure dietary TAC from plant foods. Dietary antioxidant intake is associated with a reduction in the risk of GC for both FRAP (adjusted HR 0.66; 95%CI (0.460.95) and TRAP (adjusted HR 0.61; 95%CI (0.430.87) (highest vs. lowest quintile). The association was observed for both cardia and noncardia cancers. A clear effect was observed in smokers with a significant reduction in GC risk for the fifth quintile of intake for both assays (highest vs. lowest quintile: adjusted HR 0.41; 95%CI (0.220.76) p for trend 〈0.001 for FRAP; adjusted HR 0.52; 95%CI (0.280.97) p for trend 〈0.001 for TRAP) but not in nonsmokers. In former smokers, the association with FRAP intake was statistically significant (highest vs. lowest quintile: adjusted HR 0.4; 95%CI (0.210.75) p 〈 0.05); no association was observed for TRAP. Dietary antioxidant capacity intake from different sources of plant foods is associated with a reduction in the risk of GC
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22072493
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  • 8
    Keywords: carcinoma ; MORTALITY ; AGE ; HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; UNITED-STATES ; parity ; menarche ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; ESTROGEN-BIOSYNTHESIS GENES ; FRANCISCO-BAY AREA
    Abstract: Menstrual and reproductive factors and exogenous hormone use have been investigated as pancreatic cancer risk factors in case-control and cohort studies, but results have been inconsistent. We conducted a prospective examination of menstrual and reproductive factors, exogenous hormone use and pancreatic cancer risk (based on 304 cases) in 328,610 women from the EPIC cohort. Then, in a case-control study nested within the EPIC cohort, we examined 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP17A1 (an essential gene in sex steroid metabolism) for association with pancreatic cancer in women and men (324 cases and 353 controls). Of all factors analyzed, only younger age at menarche (〈12 vs. 13 years) was moderately associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in the full cohort; however, this result was marginally significant (HR = 1.44; 95% CI = 0.992.10). CYP17A1 rs619824 was associated with HRT use (p value = 0.037) in control women; however, none of the SNPs alone, in combination, or as haplotypes were associated with pancreatic cancer risk. In conclusion, with the possible exception of an early age of menarche, none of the menstrual and reproductive factors, and none of the 12 common genetic variants we evaluated at the CYP17A1 locus makes a substantial contribution to pancreatic cancer susceptibility in the EPIC cohort.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23015357
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  • 9
    Abstract: PURPOSE: An understanding of the etiologic heterogeneity of ovarian cancer is important for improving prevention, early detection, and therapeutic approaches. We evaluated 14 hormonal, reproductive, and lifestyle factors by histologic subtype in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium (OC3). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Among 1.3 million women from 21 studies, 5,584 invasive epithelial ovarian cancers were identified (3,378 serous, 606 endometrioid, 331 mucinous, 269 clear cell, 1,000 other). By using competing-risks Cox proportional hazards regression stratified by study and birth year and adjusted for age, parity, and oral contraceptive use, we assessed associations for all invasive cancers by histology. Heterogeneity was evaluated by likelihood ratio test. RESULTS: Most risk factors exhibited significant heterogeneity by histology. Higher parity was most strongly associated with endometrioid (relative risk [RR] per birth, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74 to 0.83) and clear cell (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.76) carcinomas (P value for heterogeneity [P-het] 〈 .001). Similarly, age at menopause, endometriosis, and tubal ligation were only associated with endometrioid and clear cell tumors (P-het 〈/= .01). Family history of breast cancer (P-het = .008) had modest heterogeneity. Smoking was associated with an increased risk of mucinous (RR per 20 pack-years, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.46) but a decreased risk of clear cell (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.94) tumors (P-het = .004). Unsupervised clustering by risk factors separated endometrioid, clear cell, and low-grade serous carcinomas from high-grade serous and mucinous carcinomas. CONCLUSION: The heterogeneous associations of risk factors with ovarian cancer subtypes emphasize the importance of conducting etiologic studies by ovarian cancer subtypes. Most established risk factors were more strongly associated with nonserous carcinomas, which demonstrate challenges for risk prediction of serous cancers, the most fatal subtype.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 27325851
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; MODEL ; MODELS ; cohort study ; RISK ; TUMORS ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; REDUCED RISK ; COUNTRIES ; FIBER ; DIETARY ; adenocarcinoma ; ADENOCARCINOMAS ; case-control studies ; CARDIA ; CONSUMPTION ; FRUIT ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; nutrition ; STOMACH-CANCER ; RELATIVE RISK ; dietary fiber ; nutrient intake ; ONCOLOGY ; case control study ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; gastric cancer ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; SUBTYPES ; USA ; UNIT ; CANCER-RISK ; gastric ; ESOPHAGEAL ; cereal fiber
    Abstract: Numerous case-control studies suggest dietary fiber may reduce risk of gastric cancer, but this has not been confirmed prospectively. A previous case-control study reported reduced risk of gastric cardia adenocarcinomas associated with cereal fiber, but not with fruit or vegetable fiber. To date, different food sources of fiber have not been examined with respect to noncardia tumors or diverse histologic sub-types. This study prospectively examines associations between fiber from different food sources and incident gastric adenocarcinomas (GC) among more than 435,000 subjects from 10 countries participating in the European Prespective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Subjects aged 25-70 years completed dietary questionnaires in 1992-98, and were followed up for a median of 6.7 years. About 312 incident GCs were observed. The relative risk of GC was estimated based on cohort-wide sex-specific fiber intake quartiles using proportional hazards models to estimate hazards ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Intakes of cereal fiber, but not total, fruit or vegetable fiber, were associated with reduced GC risk [adjusted HR for the highest vs. lowest quartile of cereal fiber 0.69, 0.48-0.99]. There was a strong inverse association for diffuse [HR 0.43, 0.22-0.86], but not intestinal type [HR 0.98, 0.54-1.80] tumors. Associations for cardia vs. noncardia tumors were similar to those for overall GC, although cardia associations did not reach significance. Cereal fiber consumption may help to reduce risk of GC, particularly diffuse type tumors. Further study on different food sources of fiber in relation to GC risk is warranted to confirm these relationships
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17582605
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