Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: Medicine ; Neurosciences ; Ophthalmology ; Neurobiology ; Biomedicine ; Neurosciences ; Ophthalmology ; Neurobiology ; Springer eBooks
    Description / Table of Contents: 1. Introduction -- 2. Fundamental Retinal Circuitry for Circadian Rhythms -- 3. Circadian photoreception: from phototransduction to behaviour -- 4. Role of Melatonin and Dopamine in the Regulation of Retinal Circadian Rhythms -- 5. Circadian Organization of the Vertebrate Retina -- 6. Rhythmicity of the Retinal Pigment Epithelium -- 7. Retinal Circadian Rhythms in Mammals Revealed Using Electroretinography -- 8. Circadian Clock and Light Induced Retinal Damage -- 9. Circadian Rhythms and Vision in Zebrafish -- 10. Circadian Modulation of the Limulus Eye for Day and Night Vision -- 11. Molluscan Ocular Pacemakers: Lessons Learned. ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗
    Abstract: The retina plays a critical role in the organization of the circadian system by synchronizing the braiń€™s central clock with the external day through transduction of the daily light/dark cycle.℗ However, the substantial variation in luminance imposed on the retina between day and night also poses a challenge to its role as a sensory tissue ́€“ how is it possible to faithfully encode the enormous dynamic range of luminance that can exceed 10 orders of magnitude? The Retina and Circadian Rhythms summarizes the knowledge accumulated over the last 30 years about the organization of the retinal circadian clock in many different species, concentrating on the roles that this circadian system plays in retinal function. About the Series: The Springer Series in Vision Research is a comprehensive update and overview of cutting edge vision research, exploring, in depth, current breakthroughs at a conceptual level. It details the whole visual system, from molecular processes to anatomy, physiology and behavior and covers both invertebrate and vertebrate organisms from terrestrial and aquatic habitats. Each book in the Series is aimed at all individuals with interests in vision including advanced graduate students, post-doctoral researchers, established vision scientists and clinical investigators.The series editors are N. Justin Marshall, Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland, Australia and Shaun P. Collin, Neuroecology Group within the School of Animal Biology and the Oceans Institute at the University of Western Australia
    Pages: VIII, 238 p. 50 illus., 33 illus. in color. : online resource.
    ISBN: 9781461496137
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    ISSN: 1460-9568
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus contains a light-entrainable circadian pacemaker. Neurons in the SCN are part of a circuit that conveys light information from retinal efferents to the pineal gland. Light presented during the night acutely increases mRNA levels of the circadian clock genes Per1 and Per2 in the SCN, and acutely suppresses melatonin levels in the pineal gland. The present study investigated whether the ability of light to increase Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels and suppress pineal melatonin levels requires sodium-dependent action potentials in the SCN. Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels in the SCN and pineal melatonin levels were measured in Syrian hamsters injected with tetrodotoxin (TTX) prior to light exposure or injection of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). TTX inhibited the ability of light to increase Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels and suppress pineal melatonin levels. TTX did not, however, influence the ability of NMDA to increase Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels, though it did inhibit the ability of NMDA to suppress pineal melatonin levels. These results demonstrate that action potentials in the SCN are not necessary for NMDA receptor activation to increase Per1 and Per2 mRNA levels, but are necessary for NMDA receptor activation to decrease pineal melatonin levels. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that the mechanism through which light information is conveyed to the pacemaker in the SCN is separate from and independent of the mechanism through which light information is conveyed to the SCN cells whose efferents suppress pineal melatonin levels.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    ISSN: 1460-9568
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: In mammals a subpopulation of retinal ganglion cells are intrinsically photosensitive (ipRGCs), express the photopigment melanopsin, and play an important role in the regulation of the nonimage-forming visual system. We have recently reported that melanopsin mRNA and protein levels in the rat retina are under photic and circadian control. The aim of the present work was to investigate the mechanisms that control melanopsin expression in the rat retina. We discovered that dopamine (DA) is involved in the regulation of melanopsin mRNA, possibly via dopamine D2 receptors that are located on these ipRGCs. Interestingly, we also discovered that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) mRNA levels are affected by DA. Dopamine synthesis and release in the retina are regulated by the rod and the cone photoreceptors via retinal circuitry; our new data indicate that DA controls melanopsin expression, indicating that classical photoreceptors may modulate the transcription of this new photopigment. Our study also suggests that DA may have an important role in mediating the light signals that are used for circadian entrainment and for other responses that are mediated by the nonimage-forming visual system.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    ISSN: 1600-079X
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract: Several studies have demonstrated that norepinephrine (NE) is the critical neurotransmitter for the regulation of gene expression in the pineal gland. We studied the acute effect of NE stimulation in cultured rat pineal glands using Affymetrix rat genome microarray GeneChip probe arrays. Our data demonstrate that NE stimulation affects regulation of several genes; 44 and 29 genes were up- or down-regulated more than 2.5-fold, respectively. As shown in previous studies, arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase, cyclic AMP responsive element modulator, jun-B and c-fos mRNA levels were increased by NE stimulation. Genes that were not previously reported and increased by NE stimulation in the pineal gland were protein tyrosine phosphatase, nuclear receptors, and activity and neurotransmitter-induced early genes. Unlike up-regulated genes, most of the down-regulated genes were not reported previously. Genes encoding enzymes involved in metabolism and structural proteins were decreased following NE stimulation. Identification of genes affected by NE stimulation would provide valuable information to understanding pineal biology fully.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Science Ltd
    Journal of neurochemistry 90 (2004), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1471-4159
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Previous studies have demonstrated that the mammalian retina contains a circadian clock system that controls several retinal functions. In mammals the location of the retinal circadian clock is unknown whereas, in non-mammalian vertebrates, earlier work has demonstrated that photoreceptor cells contain the circadian clock. New experimental evidence has suggested that in mammals the retinal circadian clock may be located outside the photoreceptor cells. In this study we report that circadian rhythms in Aa-nat mRNA (in vivo) and melatonin synthesis (in vitro) are still present in the retina of rats lacking photoreceptors. The circadian pacemaker(s) controlling such rhythms is probably located in kainic acid sensitive neurons in the inner retina since kainic acid injections abolished the rhythmicity. These data are the first direct demonstration that circadian rhythmicity in the mammalian retina can be generated independently from the photoreceptors and the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...